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Latin translation: musica/musice

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:music
Latin translation:musica/musice
Entered by: Joseph Brazauskas
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17:13 Aug 29, 2008
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Art, Arts & Crafts, Painting
English term or phrase: music
music of my heart
jemima
musica/musice
Explanation:
The word is of Greek derivation. In classical authors, therefore, one will find 'musica' declined as a native Latin substantive, but especially in the poets, the Greek forms are often found in the singular (almost always the plural forms of Greek substantives were naturalised).

Thus, if using 'musice', one follows the Greek declesnion, viz.,

nom. musice
gen. musices
dat. musicae
acc. musicen
abl. musica

But naturalised Latin forms occur from time to time even in the singular. It is actually an adjectival form (mousikos, -e, -on) with the substantive 'techne', 'art, skill', understood.



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Note added at 52 mins (2008-08-29 18:06:11 GMT)
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'Music of my heart' = 'musica/musice cordis mei' or 'musica/musice praecordiorum meorum', or simply 'musica/musice animi mei'. The first two are chiefly poetic, the last chiefly prosaic.
Selected response from:

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2musica/musice
Joseph Brazauskas
4 +2musica
Valentini Mellas


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
musica


Explanation:
music
c.1250, from O.Fr. musique (12c.), from L. musica, from Gk. mousike techne "art of the Muses," from fem. of mousikos "pertaining to the Muses," from Mousa "Muse." In classical Greece, any art in which the Muses presided, but especially music. Meaning "film or theater piece of which song is an essential element" is from 1938. The use of letters to denote music notes is probably at least from ancient Greece, as their numbering system was ill-suited to the job. Natural scales begin at C (not A) because in ancient times the minor mode was more often used than the major one. The natural minor scale begins at A. To face the music "accept the consequences" is from 1850; the exact image is uncertain, one theory ties it to stage performers, another to cavalry horses having to be taught to stay calm while the regimental band plays. To make (beautiful) music with someone "have sexual intercourse" is from 1967. Children's game musical chairs is attested from 1877, hence use of musical as a modifier meaning "changing rapidly from one to another possessor" (1924). Musicology "the study of the science of music" is from 1909.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2001 Douglas Harper


American Psychological Association (APA):
music. (n.d.). Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved August 29, 2008, from Dictionary.com website: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/music
Chicago Manual Style (CMS):
music. Dictionary.com. Online Etymology Dictionary. Douglas Harper, Historian. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/music (accessed: August 29, 2008).
Modern Language Association (MLA):
"music." Online Etymology Dictionary. Douglas Harper, Historian. 29 Aug. 2008. <Dictionary.com http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/music>.


    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Definition_of_music
    Reference: http://www.iranchamber.com/music/articles/development_change...
Valentini Mellas
Greece
Local time: 21:26
Native speaker of: Greek

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Joseph Brazauskas
9 mins

agree  Kirill Semenov
35 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
musica/musice


Explanation:
The word is of Greek derivation. In classical authors, therefore, one will find 'musica' declined as a native Latin substantive, but especially in the poets, the Greek forms are often found in the singular (almost always the plural forms of Greek substantives were naturalised).

Thus, if using 'musice', one follows the Greek declesnion, viz.,

nom. musice
gen. musices
dat. musicae
acc. musicen
abl. musica

But naturalised Latin forms occur from time to time even in the singular. It is actually an adjectival form (mousikos, -e, -on) with the substantive 'techne', 'art, skill', understood.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 52 mins (2008-08-29 18:06:11 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

'Music of my heart' = 'musica/musice cordis mei' or 'musica/musice praecordiorum meorum', or simply 'musica/musice animi mei'. The first two are chiefly poetic, the last chiefly prosaic.

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kirill Semenov: hello Joseph :)
18 mins
  -> Greetings, Kirill. Thank you!

agree  Luis Antonio de Larrauri
3 days18 hrs
  -> Thank you, Antonio.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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Changes made by editors
Sep 12, 2008 - Changes made by Joseph Brazauskas:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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