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now I bring thee out of darkness

Latin translation: nunc feram te de tenebris

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:now I will bring thee out of darkness
Latin translation:nunc feram te de tenebris
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21:55 May 18, 2003
English to Latin translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: now I bring thee out of darkness
It is for a tattoo they want it wrote in latin under a picture of a wizard
Troy Henry
Nunc feram te ex tenebris
Explanation:
Dear Troy,

this is the easiest way to express this into Latin.

Nunc= now
feram= I will bring
te= thee
ex tenebris= out of the darkness

You can also say "de tenebris".

Hope this helps you!

Flavio
Selected response from:

flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 12:21
Grading comment
I found a latin to english translater program an your matched perfectly it was de tenebris......the program was called quick-latin. Thank you very very much. Troy Henry
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3Nunc ego te ex tenebris fero.xxxIno66
5 +2nunc te ex tenebris duco
Joseph Brazauskas
5 +1Nunc feram te ex tenebris
flaviofbg
5A few remarks
flaviofbg


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Nunc feram te ex tenebris


Explanation:
Dear Troy,

this is the easiest way to express this into Latin.

Nunc= now
feram= I will bring
te= thee
ex tenebris= out of the darkness

You can also say "de tenebris".

Hope this helps you!

Flavio


    Bantam
flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 12:21
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 190
Grading comment
I found a latin to english translater program an your matched perfectly it was de tenebris......the program was called quick-latin. Thank you very very much. Troy Henry

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Giusi Pasi
2 hrs

neutral  Joseph Brazauskas: 'Feram' is future.
2 hrs
  -> So what? I am afraid you think too "literal"
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22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Nunc ego te ex tenebris fero.


Explanation:
nunc = now
ego = I
te = you
ex tenebris = from/out of the darkness
fero = bring

Because of case endings, word order in Latin is far more flexible than in English. The beginning and end of a clause are emphatic positions for words.

I chose the above order because the cadence is closer to your English original. "Ego", which could have been omitted since it is indicated by the ending of "fero", emphasizes the importance of the agent of the magic. "Ego" and "te" are next to each other, showing the direct impact of the agent on the recipient of the magical influence. "Nunc" and "fero", positioned at the key sentence positions (in terms of focus), draw attention to the immediacy of the action, which can also stretch into the future.

Hope I helped some.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-18 22:19:45 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

To dispel possible ambiguity:

te = you (accusative case/object position), thee.

xxxIno66
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in pair: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Giusi Pasi: also without "ego"
1 hr
  -> Yes, the "ego" is for emphasis.

agree  Joseph Brazauskas: Perfect, except that 'to bring (i.e., fetch) someone' is more usually 'aliquem ducere'; 'aliquem ferre' , when used of persons, means to carry or bear someone or something in one's hands or arms or on one's shoulders', cf. 'ferre (or portare) et agere',
2 hrs
  -> Spot-on! Gratias maximas tibi ago.

neutral  flaviofbg: The Ego is for emphasis, but the tattoo needs word-economy, doesn't it? Grammar is good, though
7 hrs
  -> The EGO is correct grammatically. Is this a comment on Latin or tattooing or...? Please make your comments relevant to language issues. As a moderator, you should know the score. Thank you!

agree  arobsart
15 hrs
  -> Gratias tibi ago.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
nunc te ex tenebris duco


Explanation:
Lit., "Now I lead thee out of the shadows (darkness)". In classical idiom 'ferre', lit. 'to carry, bear', is used of things,'ducere',lit.'to fetch' or 'lead', of persons.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-19 01:01:00 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Compare the military phrase \'res ferre et agere\', in which \'ferre\' refers to portable booty like jewelry and paintings, and \'agere\' to draught animals and slaves.

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 367

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxIno66: Yes, DUCO is the perfect choice here. I was led astray by the "bring" of the original...
27 mins
  -> It happens to the best of us, I'm afraid.

agree  flaviofbg: And the worst of us like to take some liberty in morphologic translation...
5 hrs
  -> Personally, I prefer to translate a passage rather than simply to paraphrase it. I think that my clients deserve better than that--and I suspect that they feel the same.
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17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
A few remarks


Explanation:
To Ino66:

Thank you for reminding me what I should do and do not as a moderator. The "agree/disagree" option serves as a comment-area where answers are discussed. Translation is not solely a language issue, but a skopos issue. I am not discussing tattooing, but the translation is going to be tattooed. Therefore, don't you think word-economy is a vital point here? It is something people usually look for when asking for a Latin translation.

To Joseph:
All the best to you and your clients. They certainly deserve a present indicative more than a future indicative. It is definitely something we should take care of - being slaves to morphology. As to my translation, I find it as correct as yours. Intention is there, and present phrases like "now I bring you out" definitely have future meaning (it's not happening now, but will happen). *My* clients deserve some intentionality.

Best regards,
Flavio Ferri Benedetti

flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 12:21
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 190
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