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wilderness of the new

Latin translation: aspera novellorum

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:wilderness of the new
Latin translation:aspera novellorum
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00:08 Mar 18, 2002
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
Science - Education / Pedagogy / academic
English term or phrase: wilderness of the new
sociological concept
m. sansone
aspera novellorum
Explanation:
An interesting challenge!

Wilderness
----------

"Aspera" does not correspond exactly with "wilderness". It is rough, cruel, savage, hard, coarse, and much more. Think of English "asperity". "The hard places".

My first thought was "deserta". This is possible, it is uninhabited, forsaken, unfrequented, desert. But it feels for me so dry and empty. For this I want more an overgrown wilderness than a desert.

Then there is "lustra": wilderness, haunt of wild beasts, particularly the den of a wild boar, and thus place of debauchery, brothel. Tempting, but not quite right.

Or "regio inculta". But this does not work for me here.

I like "aspera" for this: it can be hard to come to terms with the new.

of the new
----------

Novellus = new, fresh, unfamiliar

There is also novitatis, novelty, strangeness, but this more the quality of being new.

Or simply "novus" would be possible: new, young, fresh, revived, refreshed, unusual, and particularly "novae res" political change".

But to keep it generic, as you have given it, I favour novellorum.

It occurs to me to wonder whether your phrase is a translation from the Latin. If so, I will be interested if someone comes up with the original.

Have fun!
Selected response from:

Chris Rowson
Local time: 04:35
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4aspera novellorumChris Rowson


  

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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
aspera novellorum


Explanation:
An interesting challenge!

Wilderness
----------

"Aspera" does not correspond exactly with "wilderness". It is rough, cruel, savage, hard, coarse, and much more. Think of English "asperity". "The hard places".

My first thought was "deserta". This is possible, it is uninhabited, forsaken, unfrequented, desert. But it feels for me so dry and empty. For this I want more an overgrown wilderness than a desert.

Then there is "lustra": wilderness, haunt of wild beasts, particularly the den of a wild boar, and thus place of debauchery, brothel. Tempting, but not quite right.

Or "regio inculta". But this does not work for me here.

I like "aspera" for this: it can be hard to come to terms with the new.

of the new
----------

Novellus = new, fresh, unfamiliar

There is also novitatis, novelty, strangeness, but this more the quality of being new.

Or simply "novus" would be possible: new, young, fresh, revived, refreshed, unusual, and particularly "novae res" political change".

But to keep it generic, as you have given it, I favour novellorum.

It occurs to me to wonder whether your phrase is a translation from the Latin. If so, I will be interested if someone comes up with the original.

Have fun!

Chris Rowson
Local time: 04:35
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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