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what destroys me is me

Latin translation: Quod me destruit est me

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15:01 Mar 26, 2004
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Education / Pedagogy / history
English term or phrase: what destroys me is me
it was in a history book
burcu
Latin translation:Quod me destruit est me
Explanation:
Have a nice day!
Selected response from:

suslik
United States
Local time: 10:46
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6quod me destruit, id ego sum.
Joseph Brazauskas
3Quod me destruit est mesuslik


  

Answers


59 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Quod me destruit est me


Explanation:
Have a nice day!


suslik
United States
Local time: 10:46
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in BelarusianBelarusian, Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Joseph Brazauskas: I agree with all of it except the second 'me', which is impossible. 'Est' is instransitive, and never takes a direct object in the accusative.
22 mins
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The asker has declined this answer

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
quod me destruit, id ego sum.


Explanation:
Lit., 'What destroys me, that (or 'this') I am'. This would probably be the most natural rendering in classical Latin.

'Id ego sum' exhibits a type of concord which requires agreement in case and number between the subject nominative ('id') and the predicate nominative ('ego').

I do not fault the other translator's suggestion, because the original English is impossible grammatically, and so it was natural to translate it ungrammatically. It would have been more correct to use the reflexive of the 1st person, and to have said 'What destroys me is myself'.

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kirill Semenov: is "ego sum quod me destruit" a possible form?
3 mins
  -> Yes. The only difference would be in the emphasis, which would fall on 'ego sum' as opposed to 'quod me destruit'. The relative is neuter because it refers to a clause.

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou: Here you are, at last! I totally agree with all your comments.
5 mins
  -> Thanks.

agree  flaviofbg: Yes Kirill, that's correct as well!
2 hrs
  -> Yes.

agree  neilgouw: nice translation!
6 hrs
  -> Thanks.

agree  chaplin
21 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Giusi Pasi
2 days5 hrs
  -> Thanks, Giusi.
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