KudoZ home » English to Latin » History

"At My Signal, Unleash Hell"

Latin translation: Signo dato meo, resera Tartaron.

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:"At My Signal, Unleash Hell"
Latin translation:Signo dato meo, resera Tartaron.
Entered by: Joseph Brazauskas
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

15:55 Mar 29, 2004
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
History
English term or phrase: "At My Signal, Unleash Hell"
This sentence is going to be a tatoo and it will be split in two, depending on what the translation looks like, "At my signal" on the right arm and "Unleash Hell" on my left.
Adam Hilchie
Signo dato meo, resera Tartaron.
Explanation:
Lit., '(With) my signal having been given, unbolt Tartarus'. I think that this is the closest one can come in Latin at describing hell as a place. The naturalised accusative 'Tartarum' and the neut. pl. 'Tartara' also occur.

You could also say, 'signo dato meo, emitte inferos', which would mean, 'My signal having been given, send forth (unleash) the gods of hell (the infernal gods)'.
Selected response from:

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +4Signo dato meo, resera Tartaron.
Joseph Brazauskas


  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
At my signal, unleash hell.
Signo dato meo, resera Tartaron.


Explanation:
Lit., '(With) my signal having been given, unbolt Tartarus'. I think that this is the closest one can come in Latin at describing hell as a place. The naturalised accusative 'Tartarum' and the neut. pl. 'Tartara' also occur.

You could also say, 'signo dato meo, emitte inferos', which would mean, 'My signal having been given, send forth (unleash) the gods of hell (the infernal gods)'.

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  neilgouw: beautiful! (both options)
7 mins
  -> Many thanks.

agree  Kirill Semenov: impeccable, as usual :) I would prefer the second, with "inferos" since it is probably more suited for "infernal" intention of the asker. Tartarus which is of Greek origin, probably tells less to an American/British ear.
39 mins
  -> Thank you, Kirill. I appreciate your praise, but I am not impeccable. Anyway, I agree that Tartarus might (nowadays, as opposed to days of yore) sound obscure to many Anglophones.

agree  verbis
7 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
1 day14 hrs
  -> Thanks, Vicky!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search