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legalise now, smoke tonight

Latin translation: nunc legale fac, hac nocte fuma

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06:20 May 17, 2005
English to Latin translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics / Language
English term or phrase: legalise now, smoke tonight
the phrase is for a university club called Norml:National Organisation to Reform Marijuana Laws, the phrase will be printed onto tshirts, i am a latin student but my course has not yet covered this vocab.....
Timochu
Latin translation:nunc legale fac, hac nocte fuma
Explanation:
-
Selected response from:

Deschant
Local time: 13:00
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1statim fer ut fiat, ea nocte fumato.
Joseph Brazauskas
3 +2nunc legale fac, hac nocte fumaDeschant


  

Answers


6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
nunc legale fac, hac nocte fuma


Explanation:
-

Deschant
Local time: 13:00
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in GalicianGalician
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
55 mins

agree  Joseph Brazauskas
65 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 days3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
statim fer ut fiat, ea nocte fumato.


Explanation:
Or 'statim sanci ut, etc.'. 'Ferre' or 'sancire' introducing a consecutive clause is the normal technical terminology in Roman law for legalising an act. It is difficult to translate literally, but 'statim fer ut fiat' means approximately 'carry [this motion] immediately so that it may be done [i.e., legally and generally]'. 'Sanci' instead of 'fer' would mean 'ratify, decree'. The law would, of course, have been carried in or ratified by a vote in the Senate.

One could say 'ea nocte' or 'hac nocte' or even simply 'noctu' or '(de) nocte' for 'tonight', but 'now' in the sense of 'immediately, straightaway' would be 'statim'. 'Nunc' usually implies a state of affairs already existing.

I employ the future imperative 'fumato' = 'you shall smoke' rather than the present because it is the regular form of the imperative in statements like this (i.e., slogans, maxims, laws, prohibitions, and the like).

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 14

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
63 days
  -> Tibi, eruditissimae Graecarum, maximas iterum atque iterum a me agendae sunt.
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PRO (3): xxx------, Deschant, Joseph Brazauskas


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Changes made by editors
May 19, 2005 - Changes made by Joseph Brazauskas:
LevelNon-PRO » PRO


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