KudoZ home » English to Latin » Linguistics

venus, having been moved by the prayers of the lover, gives him help

Latin translation: venus, a precibus amantis commota, eum adiuvat

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
06:04 Jul 25, 2005
English to Latin translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics / Languages
English term or phrase: venus, having been moved by the prayers of the lover, gives him help
is an example from the text book latin via ovid
Timochu
Latin translation:venus, a precibus amantis commota, eum adiuvat
Explanation:
Hello!

This would be a version.

Hope this helps you - be please remember that Proz is not going to do your homework: you should try to translate the sentence yourself, and ask for particular doubts here.

Venus is the subject, and goes in nominative case: VENUS
"having been moved by the prayers of the lover" would be a participle clause: here we need a perfect passive participle for "having been moved": commota (feminine gender, remember!), from commoveo (to move emotionally). What is she moved by? "The prayers of the lover": all this would be in the ablative case, becuase the agent of a passive sentence needs the ablative case, with a preposition "a" or "ab" (if memory serves me well, it does not need the preoposition if the agent is a human being).

Thus: "a precibus amantis" (by the prayers of the lover" (Of the lover is a genitive, of course) "commota" (see above)

eum: him (from "is ea id", he/she/it, accusative case)
adiuvat: helps (3rd singular present indicative)

Hope this helps... but please put some effort if this was actually your homework :)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 4 mins (2005-07-25 09:08:13 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Of course this is my translation, not Ovid\'s original (if there is one :)


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs 25 mins (2005-07-25 21:29:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, without \"a\": Venus, precibus amantis commota...
Selected response from:

flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 13:34
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +5venus, a precibus amantis commota, eum adiuvat
flaviofbg


  

Answers


3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
venus, a precibus amantis commota, eum adiuvat


Explanation:
Hello!

This would be a version.

Hope this helps you - be please remember that Proz is not going to do your homework: you should try to translate the sentence yourself, and ask for particular doubts here.

Venus is the subject, and goes in nominative case: VENUS
"having been moved by the prayers of the lover" would be a participle clause: here we need a perfect passive participle for "having been moved": commota (feminine gender, remember!), from commoveo (to move emotionally). What is she moved by? "The prayers of the lover": all this would be in the ablative case, becuase the agent of a passive sentence needs the ablative case, with a preposition "a" or "ab" (if memory serves me well, it does not need the preoposition if the agent is a human being).

Thus: "a precibus amantis" (by the prayers of the lover" (Of the lover is a genitive, of course) "commota" (see above)

eum: him (from "is ea id", he/she/it, accusative case)
adiuvat: helps (3rd singular present indicative)

Hope this helps... but please put some effort if this was actually your homework :)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 4 mins (2005-07-25 09:08:13 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Of course this is my translation, not Ovid\'s original (if there is one :)


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs 25 mins (2005-07-25 21:29:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, without \"a\": Venus, precibus amantis commota...


    Traupman
    Vox
flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 13:34
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Giusi Pasi
38 mins
  -> Gratias tibi ago!

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
2 hrs
  -> Gratias tibi ago!

agree  Mariusz Rytel: I would leave out the "a" in "a precibus"
11 hrs
  -> You are right Mariusz: this agent is not a human being and does not need the preposition.

agree  Kirill Semenov
12 days

agree  Joseph Brazauskas
62 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


Changes made by editors
Jul 25, 2005 - Changes made by flaviofbg:
LevelNon-PRO » PRO


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search