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to live in our hearts is not to die

Latin translation: in cordibus nostris vivere mori non est.

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:to live in our hearts is not to die
Latin translation:in cordibus nostris vivere mori non est.
Entered by: Joseph Brazauskas
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13:03 Aug 31, 2006
English to Latin translations [PRO]
Other
English term or phrase: to live in our hearts is not to die
i woukd like to translate this phrase into latin as it is on my fathers gravestone and i am thinking of engraving the latin version on a plaque
Doug Andrews
in cordibus nostris vivere mori non est.
Explanation:
The infinitive 'vivere' is used substantively (indeed, infinitives are properly verbal nouns which have acquired certain verbal forces) as the subject nominative and the infinitive 'mori' as the predicate nominative.
Selected response from:

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Grading comment
thank you very much for your efforts
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2in cordibus nostris vivere mori non est.
Joseph Brazauskas
4in corda nostra vivere non est morire...
Matthias Quaschning-Kirsch
2In cordibus nostris vivi, et non mortuus es
Kirill Semenov


  

Answers


16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
In cordibus nostris vivi, et non mortuus es


Explanation:
Literally: "Vivere in cordibus nostris non mortire est".

But please wait for others' opinions, I'm not that sure in mine.

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Note added at 20 mins (2006-08-31 13:24:35 GMT)
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My version is "Live in our hearts - and you are not dead".

Kirill Semenov
Ukraine
Local time: 01:07
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Joseph Brazauskas: The imperative singular of 'vivere' in 'vive', not 'vivi'. There is no form 'mortire' in Latin for 'to die'. That is properly 'mori' or sometimes (in Late and Mediaeval Latin, as in Italian) 'morire'.
13 hrs
  -> thank you Joseph for your explanations :)
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
in corda nostra vivere non est morire...


Explanation:
... or: in corda nostra vivere est non morire.

It depends on what you will say:
a) to live in our hearts is not "to die" or b) to live in our hearts is: "not to die"
My first suggestion renders, the second corresponds to b.


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Note added at 21 Min. (2006-08-31 13:24:59 GMT)
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Oops, it is not "in corda nostra" but ablative, "in cordibus nostris".

Matthias Quaschning-Kirsch
Germany
Local time: 00:07
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Joseph Brazauskas: Since rest or place where is implied, 'in' here requires the ablative. Likewise, Classical Latin exhibits the deponent 'mori'; 'morire' is Vulgar and did not appear in the written language until quite late.
13 hrs
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14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
in cordibus nostris vivere mori non est.


Explanation:
The infinitive 'vivere' is used substantively (indeed, infinitives are properly verbal nouns which have acquired certain verbal forces) as the subject nominative and the infinitive 'mori' as the predicate nominative.

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 30
Grading comment
thank you very much for your efforts

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kirill Semenov: thank you Joseph, I noticed my mistake about "morire" later, but do you think "non mortuus" may be used?
5 hrs
  -> Yes, Kirill, if you wish to emphasise that the person is not dead. 'Atque' would have been even more emphatic. You could also have used a consecutive (result) clause with 'ut...non...sis', if you wanted to emphaise the result aspect of it.

agree  Markus Grauer: My first thougt was a construction with "dum vivis in ..."
3 days2 hrs
  -> Thank you. I think that an impersonal temporal clause ('dum vivitur', etc.') or a proviso ('dum vivatur, etc.') is possible. 'Dum vivis, etc.' is grammatically possible, but lacks the impersonal tone of an aphorism.
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Changes made by editors
Aug 31, 2006 - Changes made by Kirill Semenov:
LevelNon-PRO » PRO


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