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PROPERTY CRIMES SECTION FACT FINDERS / HONOR, COURAGE, COMMITMENT

Latin translation: 1. crimina contra bona. 2. repertores factorum. 3. honor virtus fides.

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:PROPERTY CRIMES. FACT FINDERS. HONOR, COURAGE, COMMITMENT
Latin translation:1. crimina contra bona. 2. repertores factorum. 3. honor virtus fides.
Entered by: David Wigtil
Options:
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06:45 Jun 11, 2002
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: PROPERTY CRIMES SECTION FACT FINDERS / HONOR, COURAGE, COMMITMENT
I currently supervise a Property Crimes Section with the St. Johns County Sheriff's Office. I am trying to formulate a motto to be used by our Section and to be placed on Plaques / Certificates / correspondence etc. I would like the name of the Section:
Property Crimes Section translated to Latin
The motto of our Division:
Fact Finders translated into Latin and
The motto of our Unit:
Honor, Courage and Commitment translated into Latin.

Example

Property Crimes Section - Fact Finders
Honor Courage and Commitment

Any help you can provide would be greatly appreciated.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me.
Sgt Michael R. Quintieri
1. crimina contra bona. 2. repertores factorum. 3. honor virtus fides.
Explanation:
1. CRIMINA CONTRA BONA.
This specifies, literally, "crimes against property." Alternatives connecting "scelus/scelera" with "bonorum" automatically bring "good men" to mind, rather than "goods, property," because of the grammatical construction and because of the more moralistic tone of SCELUS/SCELERA, in contrast to CRIMEN/CRIMINA.

2. REPERTORES FACTORUM.
This indicates, "Finders/discoverers of the (actual) deeds." The word INVENTORES is actually better Latin for "finders/discoverers", but it gives to wrong impression to Latinless English speakers!

1+2. To combine the two you might want to use a continuous phrase, "REPERTORES FACTORUM DE CRIMINIBUS CONTRA BONA" ("finders of facts about crimes against property").

3. HONOR VIRTUS FIDES. Literally, "Honor, courage/virtue, loyalty/commitment." In mottoes you wouldn't use a Latin word for "and". Latin vocabulary is rather limited in contrast to that of English, and VIRTUS does duty for both "virtue" and "courage" -- it was originally a word to describe good behavior in battle (!), since it is the word VIR ("man") plus an abstractive suffix, effectively, "manliness". FIDES means "loyalty, faithfulness," etc., and is regularly used in mottoes. Alternatives like "pignus" imply "guarantees, IOUs, pawn tickets"...probably not personal virtues.

--Loquamur
Ph. D. in ancient Greek
College professor of Latin and Greek

Selected response from:

David Wigtil
United States
Local time: 14:43
Grading comment
Your answer and explaination were very helpful and much appreciated. I have been racking my brain trying to decipher from a Latin / English Dictionary and the internet. This is a very useful service. Again my most sincere appreciation. You might find it interesting to know that your translation will become a working Motto for our Agency. Something that should live on for some time.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +11. crimina contra bona. 2. repertores factorum. 3. honor virtus fides.
David Wigtil
5repertores factorum sectionis de sceleribus bonorum / HONOR VALOR PIGNUSQUE
flaviofbg
5Honor, valor, pignusque
flaviofbg
4manipulus crimis contra bona - repertores factorumAdam Bartley
4Dear Sgt Quintieri,
CLS Lexi-tech


  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Dear Sgt Quintieri,


Explanation:
I am not a Latinist, strictly speaking, although I studied Latin for many many years (middle school, high school and university).
My advise, however, would be to keep it short and translate only "Honour, courage and commitment". My impressions is that if you translate into Latin a modern concept like "property crime section" you end up with an awkward formulation.
In any case I will bring your request to the attention of our in-house translators (I work for a Canadian translation company, Lexi-tech)who know Latin and see what they think.
Other colleagues will hopefully reply.

paola l m


CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 14:43
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 8
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Honor, valor, pignusque


Explanation:
Dear Mr Quintieri,

I agree with Paola. A concept such as PROPERTY CRIMES SECTION may not have an exact equivalent in Latin and it may sound really strange. Though, Honour Courage and Commitment is easly translated as:

"honor, valor pignusque"

Pignus would be "commitment", with the added "-que" which is the English "and".

Hope it helps.

Flavio


    Distinction in Latin
flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 20:43
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 190
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
repertores factorum sectionis de sceleribus bonorum / HONOR VALOR PIGNUSQUE


Explanation:
Dear Mr Quintieri,

if you really want PROPERTY CRIME SECTION FACT FINDERS into Latin, that's my version of it:

"repertores factorum sectionis de sceleribus bonorum"

Repertores: finders
Factorum: of the facts (genitive)

Sections: of the section (genitive)
De: about (ablative preposition)
Sceleribus: the crimes (ablative plural)
Bonorum: of/regarding property (genitive plural)

The second part, as I told before.

Hope it helps!

Flavio


    Distinction in Latin
flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 20:43
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 190
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
1. crimina contra bona. 2. repertores factorum. 3. honor virtus fides.


Explanation:
1. CRIMINA CONTRA BONA.
This specifies, literally, "crimes against property." Alternatives connecting "scelus/scelera" with "bonorum" automatically bring "good men" to mind, rather than "goods, property," because of the grammatical construction and because of the more moralistic tone of SCELUS/SCELERA, in contrast to CRIMEN/CRIMINA.

2. REPERTORES FACTORUM.
This indicates, "Finders/discoverers of the (actual) deeds." The word INVENTORES is actually better Latin for "finders/discoverers", but it gives to wrong impression to Latinless English speakers!

1+2. To combine the two you might want to use a continuous phrase, "REPERTORES FACTORUM DE CRIMINIBUS CONTRA BONA" ("finders of facts about crimes against property").

3. HONOR VIRTUS FIDES. Literally, "Honor, courage/virtue, loyalty/commitment." In mottoes you wouldn't use a Latin word for "and". Latin vocabulary is rather limited in contrast to that of English, and VIRTUS does duty for both "virtue" and "courage" -- it was originally a word to describe good behavior in battle (!), since it is the word VIR ("man") plus an abstractive suffix, effectively, "manliness". FIDES means "loyalty, faithfulness," etc., and is regularly used in mottoes. Alternatives like "pignus" imply "guarantees, IOUs, pawn tickets"...probably not personal virtues.

--Loquamur
Ph. D. in ancient Greek
College professor of Latin and Greek



David Wigtil
United States
Local time: 14:43
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 60
Grading comment
Your answer and explaination were very helpful and much appreciated. I have been racking my brain trying to decipher from a Latin / English Dictionary and the internet. This is a very useful service. Again my most sincere appreciation. You might find it interesting to know that your translation will become a working Motto for our Agency. Something that should live on for some time.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yuri Geifman: neat... makes me want to dig my college Latin out of mothballs and work on improving it :-)
4 hrs
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
manipulus crimis contra bona - repertores factorum


Explanation:
Just thought I'd add a little bit more. Police and related services are often organised on military lines. In addition to the excellent answer you already have you could consider "manipulus criminis contra bona - repertores factorum" as manipulus refers to a small military unit - something roughly equivalent to an American squad or an Australian infantry section. (I'm adding this purely as an alternative to consider.)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-06-11 18:59:27 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

aaargh. That should be \"criminis\"! Sorry, my typo.

Adam

Adam Bartley
Australia
Local time: 04:43
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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