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to paint forever

Latin translation: in saecula pingere

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:to paint forever
Latin translation:in saecula pingere
Entered by: Chris Rowson
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05:35 Jan 13, 2003
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: to paint forever
to paint someting for forever.
Richard Patterson
saeculis depingere
Explanation:
Flavio´s proposal is good if it means "to paint and keep painting", although "depingere" might be better. (This word is the origin of the English "depict", and means roughly the same.)

But I wonder if "to paint forever" means something different: to paint for the ages to come. For this interpretation, I propose "saeculis depingere".

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Note added at 2003-01-13 08:28:51 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Depict\" comes form the past participle of depingere: \"depictus\".
Selected response from:

Chris Rowson
Local time: 04:03
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5in aeternum pingere/in perpetuum pingere/in saecula pingere
Joseph Brazauskas
3 +2saeculis depingereChris Rowson
5pingere semper!
flaviofbg


  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
pingere semper!


Explanation:
Dear Richard,

"to paint" is simply "pingere" as an infinitive form of the verb. You can freely put "Always" before or after the verb. It translates as "semper".

Hope it helps!

Flavio (moderator Eng>Lat)

flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 04:03
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 190
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
saeculis depingere


Explanation:
Flavio´s proposal is good if it means "to paint and keep painting", although "depingere" might be better. (This word is the origin of the English "depict", and means roughly the same.)

But I wonder if "to paint forever" means something different: to paint for the ages to come. For this interpretation, I propose "saeculis depingere".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-13 08:28:51 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Depict\" comes form the past participle of depingere: \"depictus\".

Chris Rowson
Local time: 04:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 28
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Joseph Brazauskas: I think that you're right about the interpretation.
6 hrs

agree  tancax
226 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
in aeternum pingere/in perpetuum pingere/in saecula pingere


Explanation:
Or 'depingere', which is slightly less classical.

All of these phrases imply that what is painted is intended to last forever. 'Semper pingere' would imply that the act of painting itself would last forever, not the picture being painted.

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 367
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