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Latin translation: suspicio

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19:44 Mar 26, 2003
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: look up
look up (to the sky/to god/to avoid hitting something)
Hayden
Latin translation:suspicio
Explanation:
This is the simplest and most direct way to say `look up'. You'll need to conjugate the verb. Principal parts: suspiciô, suspicere, suspêxî, suspectum.
Selected response from:

Scott Horne
Local time: 03:00
Grading comment
I'm writing a screenplay that currently has two working titles; "Five More Minutes" and now, thanks to your good self, "Suspicio". If in a couple of years you see a produced movie with either of those titles, you'll know it wasn't in vain. Thank you so very much for your time and help. Greatly appreciated!!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2Suspice, leva oculos
Marion Burns
5 +2suspicioScott Horne
5 +1oculos ad coelum, ad deum converte (convertite)smarinella
3elevare (levare) oculos
Kirill Semenov


  

Answers


25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
elevare (levare) oculos


Explanation:
to lift eyes up

Kirill Semenov
Ukraine
Local time: 10:00
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 138

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Scott Horne: periphrastic, indirect
29 mins
  -> it's biblical expression
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
oculos ad coelum, ad deum converte (convertite)


Explanation:
you can choose between "converte" (if you talk with you, confidential, II sing.) or "convertite" (if it isn't a confidential form or if it's plural, II pl.)

smarinella
Italy
Local time: 09:00
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Scott Horne: periphrastic, indirect
29 mins

agree  xxxIno66
1 hr
  -> thanks
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53 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
suspicio


Explanation:
This is the simplest and most direct way to say `look up'. You'll need to conjugate the verb. Principal parts: suspiciô, suspicere, suspêxî, suspectum.


Scott Horne
Local time: 03:00
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
I'm writing a screenplay that currently has two working titles; "Five More Minutes" and now, thanks to your good self, "Suspicio". If in a couple of years you see a produced movie with either of those titles, you'll know it wasn't in vain. Thank you so very much for your time and help. Greatly appreciated!!!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Giusi Pasi: yes!
2 hrs

agree  Joseph Brazauskas: Etymologically as well as classically correct.
7 hrs
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Suspice, leva oculos


Explanation:
Examples:
Suspice

Suspice caelum et numera stellas...
(Look up at the heavens and count the stars)
Genesis 15:5

Job 35:5
"suspice caelum et intuere..."
(Look up at the heavens and see...)

or

leva oculos

Zechariah 5:5
et egressus est angelus qui loquebatur in me et dixit ad me leva oculos tuos et vide quid est hoc quod egreditur.

(Then the angel who was speaking to me came forward and said to me, "look up and see what this is that is appearing")


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Note added at 2003-03-27 17:15:08 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

This is the imperative (command) form which I assumed was what you were looking for.

The infinitives are:
suspicere - to look up
levare oculos - to look up (literally, to raise your eyes)

Marion Burns
United States
Local time: 03:00
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Joseph Brazauskas: I don't know who proposed it first, but 'suspicere' is definitely the correct expression.
4 hrs

agree  DAIGA VEIKMANE
9 hrs
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Changes made by editors
May 6, 2005 - Changes made by Kirill Semenov:
FieldArt/Literary » Other


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