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I am your servant, Lord, I am Yours forever.

Latin translation: Servus tuus sum, Domine

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:I am your servant, Lord
Latin translation:Servus tuus sum, Domine
Entered by: senesino83
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20:52 Jan 26, 2006
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
English term or phrase: I am your servant, Lord, I am Yours forever.
I have received tentative amateur translations as follows:

Servus tuus sum, Domine, semper tuus sum. [for a masculine servant]
Serva tuus sum, Domine, semper tuus sum. [for a feminine servant]
Servus/Serva tuus sum ego, Domine, semper tuus sum.

Is "serva" correct for a female servant? Does this necessarily also carry the (unintended) meaning of "slave" or simply any kind of servant? Is the "ego" necessary, or even preferable? Is "Domine" the correct form of "Dominus" to address the Lord, and is "tuus" correct? Could "Magister" be substituted for "Domine" and retain the religious meaning of Lord? And is the word choice and order correct, or would you suggest an entirely different translation?

Thanks so much for any help you can offer!
Angelo Artigiano
servus/serva tuus/tua sum, domine, semper tuus/tua ero
Explanation:
Hello!

You must change the genre of the possessive pronoun too. I would also change the last verb into future tense (i'll always be yours).

Servus TUUS sum, semper TUUS ERO
Serva TUA sum, semper TUA ERO

Serva is correct for a female slave. Ego is not necessary at all, the Latin is satisfied enough with "sum" - if you say Ego, you really put an emphasis on the first person. Yes, "Domine" is the vocative.
From the Gloria, notice: "Domine Deus, Agnus Dei..."

For the deity, DOMINUS is much better. MAGISTER is a teacher.

Word order looks fine.

Hope this helps you!
Flavio
Selected response from:

senesino83
Local time: 08:52
Grading comment
Thanks for the help. One confusion still on my part: The possessive pronoun "yours" must agree in gender with the speaker, not with the person addressed? So "I am forever yours" translates differently depending on the gender of the speaker, TUUS for a male speaker and TUA for a female speaker, regardless of the gender of the person addressed? (As a native English speaker, genders in language baffle me!) And would SUM and ERO be interchangeable in the second phrase? Thanks so much, this is a very great help!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +1servus/serva tuus/tua sum, domine, semper tuus/tua ero
senesino83


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
i am your servant, lord, i will be yours forever.
servus/serva tuus/tua sum, domine, semper tuus/tua ero


Explanation:
Hello!

You must change the genre of the possessive pronoun too. I would also change the last verb into future tense (i'll always be yours).

Servus TUUS sum, semper TUUS ERO
Serva TUA sum, semper TUA ERO

Serva is correct for a female slave. Ego is not necessary at all, the Latin is satisfied enough with "sum" - if you say Ego, you really put an emphasis on the first person. Yes, "Domine" is the vocative.
From the Gloria, notice: "Domine Deus, Agnus Dei..."

For the deity, DOMINUS is much better. MAGISTER is a teacher.

Word order looks fine.

Hope this helps you!
Flavio

senesino83
Local time: 08:52
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks for the help. One confusion still on my part: The possessive pronoun "yours" must agree in gender with the speaker, not with the person addressed? So "I am forever yours" translates differently depending on the gender of the speaker, TUUS for a male speaker and TUA for a female speaker, regardless of the gender of the person addressed? (As a native English speaker, genders in language baffle me!) And would SUM and ERO be interchangeable in the second phrase? Thanks so much, this is a very great help!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Joseph J. Brazauskas
8 days
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