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death before dishonor

Latin translation: mors ante infamiam

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:death before dishonor
Latin translation:mors ante infamiam
Entered by: Joseph J. Brazauskas
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19:12 Feb 29, 2004
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
English term or phrase: death before dishonor
what is the difference between mors ante infamia and mors ante infamiam ?
Brian Smith
mors ante infamiam
Explanation:
The difference is, that 'infamiam' is accusative case and grammatically correct in this context, while 'infamia' in nominative and is incorrect.

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Note added at 2004-02-29 19:36:31 (GMT)
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\'Ante\', as a preposition meaning \'before, in preference to\', requires an accusative case (\'infamiam\'). The nominative case (\'infamia\') of a noun or pronoun is never used with a preposition in Latin (or in Greek or in any other Indo-European language with which I\'m acquainted, including English as regards pronouns).

Selected response from:

Joseph J. Brazauskas
United States
Local time: 05:50
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +3mors ante infamiamJoseph J. Brazauskas


  

Answers


19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
mors ante infamiam


Explanation:
The difference is, that 'infamiam' is accusative case and grammatically correct in this context, while 'infamia' in nominative and is incorrect.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-02-29 19:36:31 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\'Ante\', as a preposition meaning \'before, in preference to\', requires an accusative case (\'infamiam\'). The nominative case (\'infamia\') of a noun or pronoun is never used with a preposition in Latin (or in Greek or in any other Indo-European language with which I\'m acquainted, including English as regards pronouns).



Joseph J. Brazauskas
United States
Local time: 05:50
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 68
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
11 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Lars Helbig
20 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  verbis
5 days
  -> Many thanks.

neutral  Nicholas Ferreira: I would still opt for the more classical rendition of this phrase which is "potius mori quam foedari", a saying typical of ancient Rome.
2212 days
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