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Let go my Eggo

Latin translation: Eggo meum (meam) amitte! / Eggum meum amitte!

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Let go my Eggo
Latin translation:Eggo meum (meam) amitte! / Eggum meum amitte!
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00:11 Mar 9, 2007
English to Latin translations [Non-PRO]
Slang
English term or phrase: Let go my Eggo
This is a "commercial" term - and I would like to know how to translate this properly.

I got: amitto mea Eggo.

It's for my personal use (to engage a few smiles).

Thanks!
Nancy
Eggo meum (meam) amitte! / Eggum meum amitte!
Explanation:
I understand you mean to tell someone to keep his/her hands off your waffle. If so, you have to use the imperative of "amittere" which is "amitte" (if it's more than one you're warning off, then you'll want to use the plural "amittite"). For the posessive "my" it has to go in the accusative and be refferred to the gender of the noun "Eggo (waffle)": I'd rather use "meum" since it is both neuter and masculine and "waffle" reminds me of something in between "crustulum" ( "cookie, biscuit") and "laganum" (pancake). Still, in Latin nouns ending in "o" belong to the 3rd declension and are all feminine, then it should be "meam". Thus, it's up to you deciding whether your Eggo is masculine/neuter or feminine.
Nonetheless, since you just intend to engage a few smiles, you might mock Latin, as well, and make Eggo become "Eggum", by adding the proper neuter ending common in Latin for bakery products.

HIH and enjoy your Eggo!


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Note added at 19 hrs (2007-03-09 19:59:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

What Alcaeus is suggesting in his "agree" is to use "dimitte/dimittite" instead of "amitte/amittite", as "dimittere" means to "let go on purpose" and "amittere" "to let go by accident". He surely has a point, though "amittere" mantains also the meaning of "letting something go against one's will".
Plenty of choice for you, again! :-)
Selected response from:

Leonardo Marcello Pignataro
Local time: 16:07
Grading comment
Eggum meum amitte!

I like this and think it will work buenissimo! Thank you so very much! I like the little change to Eggum! : )
Muchas Gracias, Amigo!
Nancy

4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2Eggo meum (meam) amitte! / Eggum meum amitte!Leonardo Marcello Pignataro


  

Answers


9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
let go my eggo
Eggo meum (meam) amitte! / Eggum meum amitte!


Explanation:
I understand you mean to tell someone to keep his/her hands off your waffle. If so, you have to use the imperative of "amittere" which is "amitte" (if it's more than one you're warning off, then you'll want to use the plural "amittite"). For the posessive "my" it has to go in the accusative and be refferred to the gender of the noun "Eggo (waffle)": I'd rather use "meum" since it is both neuter and masculine and "waffle" reminds me of something in between "crustulum" ( "cookie, biscuit") and "laganum" (pancake). Still, in Latin nouns ending in "o" belong to the 3rd declension and are all feminine, then it should be "meam". Thus, it's up to you deciding whether your Eggo is masculine/neuter or feminine.
Nonetheless, since you just intend to engage a few smiles, you might mock Latin, as well, and make Eggo become "Eggum", by adding the proper neuter ending common in Latin for bakery products.

HIH and enjoy your Eggo!


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 hrs (2007-03-09 19:59:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

What Alcaeus is suggesting in his "agree" is to use "dimitte/dimittite" instead of "amitte/amittite", as "dimittere" means to "let go on purpose" and "amittere" "to let go by accident". He surely has a point, though "amittere" mantains also the meaning of "letting something go against one's will".
Plenty of choice for you, again! :-)

Leonardo Marcello Pignataro
Local time: 16:07
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
Grading comment
Eggum meum amitte!

I like this and think it will work buenissimo! Thank you so very much! I like the little change to Eggum! : )
Muchas Gracias, Amigo!
Nancy
Notes to answerer
Asker: Bonjourno Leonardo! thank you (grazie) for translating my unusual request. I requested this because a few people I write emails to have a (serious) Latin line attached to their signature. I think we all need a good laugh and would like to make a new one up every once in a while - for fun! Thank you so much for taking the time to write. Merci beaucoup - tu es tres gentil! Nancy : ) Canada ps: where did you learn Latin?


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Valentini Mellas
1 min
  -> Grazie, Valentini! E buona colazione :-)!

agree  Joseph Brazauskas: Vellem ut potius 'dimitte' quam 'amitte' usus sis; hoc enim 'let go (by accident)', illud 'let go (on purpose)', usitato significat. Attamen est rectum responsum tuum.
7 hrs
  -> Gratias ago!
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