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Exempt (in Human Resources)

Portuguese translation: Funcionário Mensalista

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Exempt Employee
Portuguese translation:Funcionário Mensalista
Entered by: M.Badra
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02:57 Mar 7, 2002
English to Portuguese translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Human Resources / Human Resources
English term or phrase: Exempt (in Human Resources)
Slogan de um programa de seleção interna de pessoal: "My Career Connection", the XXXCo Exempt Internal Job Posting System.

Tradução para pt_br.
M.Badra
Brazil
Local time: 05:21
Isento
Explanation:
I am not sure the word is 'isento' in Brazil (or Portugal). But, here's an explanation: In the US, if you work for a corporation, generally, you may be an Exempt or an Hourly Employee. The Exempt doesn't need to report the hours worked, that means he is not paid by the hour. He has a salary, generaly annual, agreed from the start. As an Exempt he/she works to accomplish tasks, doing whatever necessary to finish them and has no overtime paid (but the manager may consider incentives). In contrast, the hourly employee is paid by the hour worked. Therefore, and if there is a task that requires him/her to stay over the regular workday time, he should be paid overtime (by law, and as per agreement). Conversely, if there is no task (theoretically at least) he is not paid. Therefore , he/she should punch timecard everyday to keep track of the hours worked, whereas the Exempt doesn't need to puch timecard because he is expect to put in as many time necessary to finish the job or put in 8 hours of work everyday (which, by the way, is also reported in some other way, as the manager or the HR requires). He/she will be paid whether there are tasks to be done or not. That's the difference between an Exempt and a Hourly Employee here in the US. There must be a similar term used in Brazil that I don't remember at the moment. I don't believe the Exempt employee is considered higher than the Hourly employee because when you are hired, in certain companies (and depending on the position), you may choose which way you want to be paid, Exempt or Hourly. Or, the type of position you apply is already determined as Exempt or Hourly. I worked for a large corporation in the Localization Dept (as a Localization Specialist) and I got to choose, I chose Exempt. For some positions it may not make sense to be Exempt. For other positions it has to be Hourly. Generally though, if you work in a production line you will be Hourly, if you work in the office you will be Exempt.
Exempt or hourly is all regulated under labor laws. I didn't have the time to look, but there is a little more involved in been Exempt or Hourly.
Hope this brief explanation helps a bit.
Selected response from:

Charles Fontanetti
Local time: 01:21
Grading comment
Charles,

Thank you very much for your explanation. In Brazil, "Exempt" would be roughly equivalent to a "Mensalista" (and an Hourly is clearly an "Horista").

And also thanks to all you people who take the time to help me out.

Márcio
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5Isento
Charles Fontanetti
4 +1sistema isento de colocação interna da companhia XXX
BrazBiz
5Sistema de publicação da Cia XXX de Funcionários do nível Isento
Theodore Fink
4 +1isento
Rafa Lombardino


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
isento


Explanation:
"Sistema Isento de Trabalho de Postagem Interna" ou "Sistema de Trabalho Postal Interno e Isento".

Boa sorte!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-07 03:07:08 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Esse sistema se refere a uma política empresarial que permite a emissão de materiais de comunicação entre seus funcionários, ou seja, a comunicação interna não é cobrada.


    Reference: http://www.google.com.br/search?q=cache:K-iBrZVoqWYC:www.sep...
    Reference: http://www.septagon.com/7sides.html
Rafa Lombardino
United States
Local time: 01:21
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Armando A. Cottim
6 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Sistema de publicação da Cia XXX de Funcionários do nível Isento


Explanation:
the XXXCo Exempt Internal Job Posting System, means that XXXCo is looking for employees at the exempt level.

Exempt employees are a higher level. They don't punch clocks, they don't get overtime. Etc.

Theodore Fink
Local time: 04:21
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
sistema isento de colocação interna da companhia XXX


Explanation:
O job posting permite ao funcionário se candidatar para um outro cargo dentro da companhia. Dependendo do texto, o termo exempt pode significar que se o funcionário se coloca para uma nova função e não é selecionado, isso não vai afetar a colocação que ele tem agora. Espero que te ajude.



BrazBiz
Brazil
Local time: 05:21
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Paulo Celestino Guimaraes: Boa explicação porém traduziria como: programa/sistema não-obrigatório ou opcional.
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Isento


Explanation:
I am not sure the word is 'isento' in Brazil (or Portugal). But, here's an explanation: In the US, if you work for a corporation, generally, you may be an Exempt or an Hourly Employee. The Exempt doesn't need to report the hours worked, that means he is not paid by the hour. He has a salary, generaly annual, agreed from the start. As an Exempt he/she works to accomplish tasks, doing whatever necessary to finish them and has no overtime paid (but the manager may consider incentives). In contrast, the hourly employee is paid by the hour worked. Therefore, and if there is a task that requires him/her to stay over the regular workday time, he should be paid overtime (by law, and as per agreement). Conversely, if there is no task (theoretically at least) he is not paid. Therefore , he/she should punch timecard everyday to keep track of the hours worked, whereas the Exempt doesn't need to puch timecard because he is expect to put in as many time necessary to finish the job or put in 8 hours of work everyday (which, by the way, is also reported in some other way, as the manager or the HR requires). He/she will be paid whether there are tasks to be done or not. That's the difference between an Exempt and a Hourly Employee here in the US. There must be a similar term used in Brazil that I don't remember at the moment. I don't believe the Exempt employee is considered higher than the Hourly employee because when you are hired, in certain companies (and depending on the position), you may choose which way you want to be paid, Exempt or Hourly. Or, the type of position you apply is already determined as Exempt or Hourly. I worked for a large corporation in the Localization Dept (as a Localization Specialist) and I got to choose, I chose Exempt. For some positions it may not make sense to be Exempt. For other positions it has to be Hourly. Generally though, if you work in a production line you will be Hourly, if you work in the office you will be Exempt.
Exempt or hourly is all regulated under labor laws. I didn't have the time to look, but there is a little more involved in been Exempt or Hourly.
Hope this brief explanation helps a bit.

Charles Fontanetti
Local time: 01:21
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Charles,

Thank you very much for your explanation. In Brazil, "Exempt" would be roughly equivalent to a "Mensalista" (and an Hourly is clearly an "Horista").

And also thanks to all you people who take the time to help me out.

Márcio
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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