KudoZ home » English to Portuguese » Law (general)

I have the honour to be with an attachment as worn as inviolable

Portuguese translation: I have the honour to be, with an affection/loyalty that is as longstanding as it is unquestionable

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
15:31 Nov 8, 2007
English to Portuguese translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general) / Old letters
English term or phrase: I have the honour to be with an attachment as worn as inviolable
"I have the honour to be with an attachment as worn as inviolable, my dear cousin,
Your very humble and very obedient servant"
- I'm struggling to translate "with an attachment as worn as inviolable", whch is at the end of a XVIII centry letter.
Cassio de Figueiredo-Azze
Local time: 06:57
Portuguese translation:I have the honour to be, with an affection/loyalty that is as longstanding as it is unquestionable
Explanation:
First of all, let's deconstruct the sentence. The main clause is "I have the honour to be (...), my dear cousin,
Your very humble and very obedient servant". A typical 18th century valediction.
I suggest that "with an attachment as worn as inviolable" is an adverbial phrase qualifying "be" i.e. it qualifies the writer's position in relation to the recipient.

Now, we must dispense with the idea that "attachment" here means "anexo". These valedictions at the end of 18th century letters were originally intended as statements of loyalty, affection or love and were not, I would suggest, the place for stating that an annex is enclosed. Rather, I think the "attachment" referred to here means affection (as in "I'm very attached to him"). In any case, I think "enclosure" would have been used for "annex" at that time - "attachment" in that sense is much later, probably 20th century.

"Inviolable", I think, means unchallengeable/unquestionable/not in doubt, and "worn" (more uncertain) may mean "longstanding, enduring, well established".

So what do we have? I suggest: "I have the honour to be, with an affection/loyalty that is as longstanding as it is unquestionable ..."

That would be my interpretation from what I know of 18th century English prose.
Selected response from:

lexical
Spain
Local time: 07:57
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +5Tenho a honra de carregar um apêndice tão usado como inviolável.Vania de Souza
3I have the honour to be, with an affection/loyalty that is as longstanding as it is unquestionablelexical


  

Answers


45 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
i have the honour to be with an attachment as worn as inviolable
Tenho a honra de carregar um apêndice tão usado como inviolável.


Explanation:
O documento em questão deve estar anexo ao principal, e o seu uso é frequente, mas ele é inviolável Parece tratar-se de um doumento impeditório de alguma transação.

Vania de Souza
Local time: 06:57
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Isabel Oliveira: colocaria "anexo" para "attachment"
1 hr

agree  rhandler: Eu também.
1 hr

agree  Humberto Ribas: anexo
2 hrs

agree  Denise Miranda: É, anexo soa melhor!
4 hrs

agree  Cristina Santos
6 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
i have the honour to be with an attachment as worn as inviolable
I have the honour to be, with an affection/loyalty that is as longstanding as it is unquestionable


Explanation:
First of all, let's deconstruct the sentence. The main clause is "I have the honour to be (...), my dear cousin,
Your very humble and very obedient servant". A typical 18th century valediction.
I suggest that "with an attachment as worn as inviolable" is an adverbial phrase qualifying "be" i.e. it qualifies the writer's position in relation to the recipient.

Now, we must dispense with the idea that "attachment" here means "anexo". These valedictions at the end of 18th century letters were originally intended as statements of loyalty, affection or love and were not, I would suggest, the place for stating that an annex is enclosed. Rather, I think the "attachment" referred to here means affection (as in "I'm very attached to him"). In any case, I think "enclosure" would have been used for "annex" at that time - "attachment" in that sense is much later, probably 20th century.

"Inviolable", I think, means unchallengeable/unquestionable/not in doubt, and "worn" (more uncertain) may mean "longstanding, enduring, well established".

So what do we have? I suggest: "I have the honour to be, with an affection/loyalty that is as longstanding as it is unquestionable ..."

That would be my interpretation from what I know of 18th century English prose.

lexical
Spain
Local time: 07:57
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 12
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search