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lion's mane jellyfish

Portuguese translation: água-viva juba-de-leão

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:lion's mane jellyfish
Portuguese translation:água-viva juba-de-leão
Entered by: Rafael Mantovani
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23:02 Jul 12, 2008
English to Portuguese translations [PRO]
Science - Zoology
English term or phrase: lion's mane jellyfish
é uma espécie de água-viva (medusa), Cyanea Capillata:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lion's_mane_jellyfish

obrigado
Rafael Mantovani
Germany
Local time: 01:37
água-viva juba-de-leão
Explanation:
mundoestranho.abril.com.br/materia/materia_188659.shtml

ÁGUA-VIVA JUBA-DE-LEÃO. "Cyanea arctica". Atlântico Norte. Essa água-viva tem "apenas" 2 metros de diâmetro, mas seus tentáculos atingem 30 metros, ...


http://www.deolhonasorigens.com.br/inspiracao/naturezaviva/2...

A água-viva, também conhecida como medusa, pertence ao grupo dos celenterados e é parente das anêmonas e hidras. É transparente, e seu corpo parecido com uma geléia nada livremente ao sabor das ondas, com a boca voltada para baixo. Alimenta-se de peixes e moluscos que flutuam no mar. Cerca de 2.500 águas-vivas passaram nove dias na órbita da Terra. Os biólogos acreditam que elas são ideais para o estudo da adaptação do homem no espaço.
Apesar da aparência inofensiva, as medusas já mataram muita gente. A ----- juba-de-leão-------, que vive nos mares do Atlântico Norte, tem comprimento equivalente a um prédio de dez andares. Em cada tentáculo carrega 750 mil cápsulas dotadas de um arpão venenoso.
A única medusa visível a distância é a caravela, que mantém fora d’água uma bóia que funciona como a vela de um navio. É bom cuidar com essas bolas de gelatina colorida. Se você estiver na praia e uma delas o pegar:(...)


http://www.mbl.edu/BiologicalBulletin/KEYS/INVERTS/3/Dscypho...

(...)Family CYANEIDAE (...)
Cyanea capillata (Linnaeus, 1758) [Cyanea arctica Péron and Lesueur, 1809; Cyanea fulva L. Agassiz, 1862]. The "lion's mane". Mesohaline--euhaline. Frequent throughout the area during winter and spring, and occasionally in summer. Two varieties occur locally, arguably representing different subspecies or even species. The boreal ----- Cyanea capillata var. arctica ------ seems to differ from the temperate ------ C. capillata var. fulva -------- in its larger maximum size, in color, in some minor morphological characters (e.g., in lacking exumbrellar papillae), and possibly in ecology including seasonality (see Brewer, 1991). Venomous. (...)

bom jantar! (...brincadeirinha....)
beatriz
Selected response from:

transl8_2
Brazil
Local time: 20:37
Grading comment
parece ser isso mesmo, obrigado a transl, mariana, gábor e todos que ajudaram
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +3juba de leão/geleia do mane de leão
Mariana Moreira
3 +2água-viva juba-de-leão
transl8_2
5(Cyanea capillata)xxxsavaria


  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
juba de leão/geleia do mane de leão


Explanation:
Encontrei várias referências a estas duas designações:

Foto: Geléias do mane do leão (capillata de Cyanea). Geléias do mane do leão (capillata de Cyanea) [Código da imagem: p17652p] ...
pt.mongabay.com/travel/07_08_30/p17652p.html

http://sherlockholmesbr.vilabol.uol.com.br/ajuba.htm

espero que ajude:)

Mariana Moreira
Portugal
Local time: 00:37
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  JoaoMoreira
4 mins
  -> João, obrigada

agree  Mary Palmer: isso
13 mins
  -> Mary, obrigada

agree  IaraFino
16 hrs
  -> Iara, obrigada
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
(Cyanea capillata)


Explanation:
The lion's mane jellyfish (Cyanea capillata) is the largest known species of jellyfish. Its range is confined to cold, boreal waters of the Arctic, northern Atlantic and northern Pacific Oceans, seldom found farther south than 42°N latitude. Similar jellyfish (which may be the same species) are known from the seas off Australia and New Zealand. The Arctic Lion's mane jellyfish is one of the longest known animals; the largest recorded specimen had a bell (body) with a diameter of 2.3 m (7 feet 6 inches) and the tentacles reached 36.5 m (120 feet). It was found washed up on the shore of Massachusetts Bay in 1870.

TAXONOMY

The taxonomy of Cyanea species is not fully agreed; some zoologists have suggested that all species within the genus should be treated as one. Two distinct taxa however occur together in at least the eastern North Atlantic, with the blue jellyfish (Cyanea lamarckii Péron & Lesueur, 1810) differing in blue (not red) colour and smaller size (10-20 cm diameter, rarely 35 cm). Populations in the western Pacific around Japan are sometimes distinguished as Cyanea nozakii Kisinouye, 1891, or as a race, Cyanea capillata nozakii.

Description
A common species, the lion's mane jellyfish is well known to divers for its painful, but seldom fatal stings; they are toxic and can cause severe burns. Most encounters cause only temporary pain and localized redness.


Cyanea sp.Although capable of attaining a bell diameter of 2.5 m (8 feet), these jellyfish are highly variable in size; those found in lower latitudes are much smaller than their far northern counterparts with bells about 50 cm (20 inches) in diameter. The tentacles of larger specimens may trail as long as 30 m (100 feet) or more. These extremely sticky tentacles are grouped into eight clusters, each cluster containing 65-150 tentacles, arranged in a series of rows.

The bell is divided into eight lobes, giving it the appearance of an eight-pointed star. An ostentatiously tangled arrangement of colourful arms emanates from the centre of the bell, much shorter than the silvery, thin tentacles which emanate from the bell's subumbrella.

Size also dictates coloration: larger specimens are a vivid crimson to dark purple while smaller specimens grade to a lighter orange or tan. These jellyfish are understandably named for their showy, trailing tentacles reminiscent of a lion's mane.


Ecology

A coldwater species, this jellyfish cannot cope with warmer waters. The jellyfish are pelagic for most of their lives but tend to settle in shallow, sheltered bays towards the end of their one-year lifespan. In the open ocean, lion's mane jellyfish act as floating oases for certain species, such as shrimp, medusafish, butterfish, harvestfish and juvenile prowfish, providing both a reliable source of food and protection from predators.

Predators of the lion's mane jellyfish include seabirds, larger fish, other jellyfish species and sea turtles. The jellies themselves feed mostly on zooplankton, small fish, ctenophores, and moon jellies.

Behavior and reproduction

A dead Lion's Mane jelly washing up on the beach.Lion's mane jellyfish remain mostly very near the surface at no more than 20 m depth, their slow pulsations weakly driving them forwards; they depend on ocean currents whereby the jellies travel great distances. The jellyfish are most often spotted during the late summer and autumn, when they have grown to a large size and the currents begin to sweep them closer to shore.

These jellyfish are capable of both sexual reproduction in the medusa stage and asexual reproduction in the polyp stage.

Much speculation and even superstition revolves around predicting Lion's Mane population blooms and concentrations in locations popular for recreation. Among the Outer Islands (Long Island, Block Island, Martha's Vineyard, Nantucket, Monomoy, lesser islands, and Cape Cod) Lion's Mane populations show a very regular yearly population, and a very predictable seasonal flux. Starting with the first warm day of spring, often when sea thermoclines occur just inches below the surface, countless young Lion's Manes can be seen. These are as small as sand grains, and appear in the billions. As the water continues to warm, the majority of these will die. The remaining few (likely three or more orders of magnitude fewer) will slowly grow. By summers end, the average bell size may exceed 6 inches (Typical of Long Island). Barring drastic climate variations, jelly populations are unlikely to change even from one decade to the next. Tides, currents, and wind patterns may temporarily change conditions at a swimming location, however this does not reflect overall jelly population dynamics. The reliability of jelly populations from one year to the next is such that one can predict bell size and concentrations with great accuracy given only water temperature information. Concerned swimmers must either wear protection, tolerate stings, or swim during seasons known to feature a reduced risk of stings. In spring, when water remains cold, the young Lion's Manes are too small to hurt. By the end of the summer, the remaining animals are quite large, but rather uncommon. The worst time for encounters, then, is during the core of the summer. On Long Island, the peak jelly period is between the beginning of June and the beginning of August. May and August are the best times to swim if Lion's Manes are a concern.

[edit] In popular culture
The Lion's mane jellyfish was mentioned in the Sherlock Holmes short story The Adventure of the Lion's Mane published in The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes, in which Holmes, in one of his rare independent cases (Dr. Watson did not participate in the matter at all, and the story was written as if by Holmes himself), discovers that the true murderer of a school professor was actually this jellyfish. Suspicion was originally laid upon the professor's rival in love, until the latter was also attacked by the same jellyfish


    Reference: http://jellieszone.com/cyanea.htm
    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lion%27s_mane_jellyfish
xxxsavaria
Hungary
Local time: 01:37
Native speaker of: Native in HungarianHungarian
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
água-viva juba-de-leão


Explanation:
mundoestranho.abril.com.br/materia/materia_188659.shtml

ÁGUA-VIVA JUBA-DE-LEÃO. "Cyanea arctica". Atlântico Norte. Essa água-viva tem "apenas" 2 metros de diâmetro, mas seus tentáculos atingem 30 metros, ...


http://www.deolhonasorigens.com.br/inspiracao/naturezaviva/2...

A água-viva, também conhecida como medusa, pertence ao grupo dos celenterados e é parente das anêmonas e hidras. É transparente, e seu corpo parecido com uma geléia nada livremente ao sabor das ondas, com a boca voltada para baixo. Alimenta-se de peixes e moluscos que flutuam no mar. Cerca de 2.500 águas-vivas passaram nove dias na órbita da Terra. Os biólogos acreditam que elas são ideais para o estudo da adaptação do homem no espaço.
Apesar da aparência inofensiva, as medusas já mataram muita gente. A ----- juba-de-leão-------, que vive nos mares do Atlântico Norte, tem comprimento equivalente a um prédio de dez andares. Em cada tentáculo carrega 750 mil cápsulas dotadas de um arpão venenoso.
A única medusa visível a distância é a caravela, que mantém fora d’água uma bóia que funciona como a vela de um navio. É bom cuidar com essas bolas de gelatina colorida. Se você estiver na praia e uma delas o pegar:(...)


http://www.mbl.edu/BiologicalBulletin/KEYS/INVERTS/3/Dscypho...

(...)Family CYANEIDAE (...)
Cyanea capillata (Linnaeus, 1758) [Cyanea arctica Péron and Lesueur, 1809; Cyanea fulva L. Agassiz, 1862]. The "lion's mane". Mesohaline--euhaline. Frequent throughout the area during winter and spring, and occasionally in summer. Two varieties occur locally, arguably representing different subspecies or even species. The boreal ----- Cyanea capillata var. arctica ------ seems to differ from the temperate ------ C. capillata var. fulva -------- in its larger maximum size, in color, in some minor morphological characters (e.g., in lacking exumbrellar papillae), and possibly in ecology including seasonality (see Brewer, 1991). Venomous. (...)

bom jantar! (...brincadeirinha....)
beatriz

transl8_2
Brazil
Local time: 20:37
Native speaker of: Portuguese
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
parece ser isso mesmo, obrigado a transl, mariana, gábor e todos que ajudaram

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maria Meneses: ou alforreca juba-de-leão
33 mins

agree  rhandler
58 mins
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