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ok

Russian translation: OK

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:OK
Russian translation:OK
Entered by: xxxga5
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

11:30 Jul 5, 2003
English to Russian translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: ok
скажите может кто знает происхождение слова ok
okey dockey?????
xxxga5
окей он и в Африке окей
Explanation:
Американец из Миннисоты, профессор английского в Columbia University, Аллен Волкер Рид решил научно доказать американское происхождение термина OK. С полными основаниями его можно назвать самым выдающимся экспертом в области истории ОК. За свою долгую жизнь в науке Аллен выяснил происхождение многих слов, прежде всего - относящихся к American English. В ходе исследований, связанных со знаменитым слогом, он изучил 12 различных версий. Одна из них была связана с галетами Orrin Kendall, которыми снабжались солдаты Союза во время гражданской войны в Америке. Согласно другой версии, это слово - термин Open Key, используемый в телеграфном языке.
В действительности, доказал Аллен, впервые это слово появилось в сатирической статье о плохой орфографии, опубликованной в газете Boston Morning Post в 1839 году, как ахроним Oll Korrect (а не all correct). В 1840 году оно использовалось как инициалы Old Kinderhook, псевдоним Мартина Ван Бурена, восьмого президента США. В призывах к его так и несостоявшемуся переизбранию его сторонники писали: "Голосуйте за ОК".
Другие исследователи американской истории отмечают, что ОК может иметь более древнее происхождение, чем его появление в Morning Post. Оно может принадлежать американским индейцам, использовавшим термин "okeh" как утвердительный ответ на вопрос.
Кто первым сказал "ОК"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 mins (2003-07-05 11:44:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

okey doke
okey doke
Okey doke is used in the same way as `OK\' to show that you agree to something, or that you want to start talking about something else or doing something else. (INFORMAL, SPOKEN)
Okey doke. I\'ll give you a ring.
CONVENTION also okey dokey

(c) HarperCollins Publishers.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 18 mins (2003-07-05 11:49:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

OK is a term of approval, sometimes written phonetically as okay, or extended to okey dokey or even, thanks to Ned Flanders, okelly dokelly. Originally it was short for \"Oll Korrect\", a deliberate mispelling of \"all correct\", written by a professor for completed school papers he corrected. The first recorded use of \"OK\" was in the Boston Morning Post on March 23, 1839. It has since become a colloquial referent, used everyday among English speakers, and borrowed by non-English speakers.
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/OK


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 mins (2003-07-05 11:51:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Я в этом и сам был уверен, но вот подтверждение. Словарь -- это документ:

http://www.macquariedictionary.com.au/p/dictionary/slang-o.h...
okey-doke
adverb yes; all right; okay. Also, okey-dokey. [rhyming reduplication of okay]

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 22 mins (2003-07-05 11:53:18 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

А вот еще словарь. Wordorigins называется:
http://www.wordorigins.org/wordoro.htm#ok
OK
OK is the most successful of all Americanisms. It has invaded hundreds of other languages and been adopted by them as a word. Mencken claims that US troops deployed overseas during WWII found it already in use by Bedouins in the Sahara to the Japanese in the Pacific. It was also the fourth word spoken on the surface of the moon:

Buzz Aldrin: Contact light.
Neil Armstrong: Shutdown.
Aldrin: OK. Engine stop. ACA out of Detent.
Armstrong: Out of Detent. Auto.
Aldrin: Mode Control, both Auto. Descent Engine Command Override, Off. Engine Arm, Off. 413 is in.
Charlie Duke (Houston CapCom): We copy you down, Eagle.
Armstrong: Engine arm is off ... Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.
Duke: Roger, Tranquility. We copy you on the ground. You got a bunch of guys about to turn blue. We\'re breathing again. Thanks a lot.
Despite the term\'s success, however, for years no one was really sure where the word came from. The origin of OK became the Holy Grail of etymology. Finally, in 1963 the Galahad of our story, Dr. Allen Walker Read of Columbia University uncovered the origin.

But first, some of the more popular suggestions as to the origin are as follows. These can all be dismissed because of lack of evidence or because OK predates the events that supposedly led to creation:

It stands for oll korrect, a misspelling of all correct, usually by a famous person, most often Andrew Jackson. This one comes close to the mark, but still misses it.

It stands for Old Kinderhook, the nickname of Martin Van Buren who came from Kinderhook, New York. Old Kinderhook played a role in popularizing the term, but it is not its origin. (More on this later.)

It comes from any one of a number of languages, most often the Choctaw word okeh. This explanation often involves Andrew Jackson again, but this time adopting it from the Indian language not because he was orthographically-challenged. A later president, Woodrow Wilson, favored this explanation, but he was wrong. As far as this explanation goes, it was not suggested until 1885 and no evidence exists that this, or any foreign word, is in fact the origin.

It is an abbreviation for Oberst Kommandant, or Colonel-in-Command, used by Von Steuben or Schliessen (take your pick) during the Revolutionary War. No record of either man, or anyone until 1839, using this phrase exists.

It comes from the French Aux Cayes, a port in Haiti famed for its rum.

It stood for Orrin Kendall crackers supplied to the Union Army during the Civil War. Unfortunately for Orrin\'s immortality, OK was in use twenty years before the Civil War.

It stood for Obadiah Kelly, a railroad shipping clerk akin to Kilroy who initialed bills of lading. And,

That it was an 1860s telegraph term for Open Key.
Of the above explanations, the first comes the closest to being true, but it too is false. Andrew Jackson was a notoriously poor speller. So much so that his spelling became an issue in the 1828 campaign. (Dan Quayle can take heart in the fact that he was not the first.) He is not, however, known to have ever used the expression OK or misspelled \"all correct\" with the two letters in question. The association of the word OK with Jackson, however, is not entirely without foundation. George W. Stimpson\'s Nuggets Of Knowledge, published in 1934 cites a 1790 court record from Sumner County, Tennessee in which Jackson \"proved a bill of sale from Hugh McGary to Gasper Mansker, for a Negro man, which was O.K.\" This was probably just poor penmanship on the part of a court clerk, however. James Parton\'s biography of Jackson suggests that is really an illegible O.R., which was the abbreviation used for Order Recorded.

The incorrect spelling explanation is the correct one. Although the part about Andrew Jackson is almost certainly apocryphal. Allen Walker Read of Columbia University solved the mystery in a series of articles in American Speech in 1963-64. In 1839, a \"frolicsome group,\" as Read describes them, called the Anti-Bell-Ringing Society in Boston started using the term to stand for oll korrect, a facetious misspelling.

The first recorded use of OK was in the spring of 1839 by the Boston Morning Post:

(23 March) He of the Journal...would have the \'contribution box,\' et ceteras, o.k.--all correct--and cause the corks to fly, like sparks, upward.

(26 March) Had the pleasure of taking these \'interesting strangers\' by the hand, and wishing them a speedy passage to the Commercial Emporium, They were o.k.

(10 April) It is hardly necessary to say to those who know Mr. Hughes, that his establishment will be found to be \'A. No. One\'--that is, O.K.--all correct.

By July of that year, the term spread south to New York, and quickly gained wide acceptance:

(27 July, Evening Tattler) These \'wise men from the East\'...are right...to play at bowls with us as long as we are willing to set ourselves up, like skittles, to be knocked down for their amusement and emolument. OK! all correct!
The next year, 1840, New York Democrats formed an organization called the OK Club. The name of the club stood for Old Kinderhook as Martin Van Buren was running for reelection that year. Since the term was in use prior to the formation of the OK Club, it seems likely that the name of the club was due in part due to the phrase, not vice versa. The activities of the OK Club, however, undoubtedly contributed to the popularity of OK even if not providing the origin.

The variant A-OK first appeared during NASA\'s Mercury program of the 1960s. It may be a combination of A-One with OK. Tom Wolfe in The Right Stuff, however, claims that it was originally used by Shorty Powers, the \"Voice of Mercury Control,\" in radio transmissions because the \"A\" sound cut through static better than the \"O\".

Selected response from:

Yuri Smirnov
Local time: 05:05
Grading comment
spasibo VSEM
OSOBENNO YURIYU I KIRILU ZA VARIANTI ...
MODERATORAM;; MOJET TAKOYE BIT CHTO 2 OTVETA KLASNIYE ????
ESLI DA TO POCHEMU NE VVESTI PO 4 BALA ?????
DVUM ANSWERAV
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +6All Correct!
Dobriansky
4 +4окей он и в Африке окей
Yuri Smirnov
2несколько версий
Kirill Semenov


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
All Correct!


Explanation:
А сокращение получилось по первым звукам этого словосочетания.
Из лекций по истории языка ;-)

Dobriansky
Ukraine
Local time: 05:05
PRO pts in pair: 92

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ludwig Chekhovtsov: мне нравится
49 mins
  -> Спасибо

agree  Сергей Лузан: Да, это именно так. Американцы на слух транслитерировали. 5. The Random House Dictionary, ISBN 0-394-51200-6
3 hrs
  -> Спасибо

agree  xxxOleg Pashuk: the most popular version: misspelled "all correct"
5 hrs
  -> Спасибо

agree  Jolanta Schimenti: "Orl korrect" (All correct) - 1839, Boston, MA
7 hrs
  -> Спасибо

agree  huntr
1 day3 hrs
  -> Спасибо

agree  Ravindra Godbole
2 days23 hrs
  -> Спасибо
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
несколько версий


Explanation:
". . .During the Creek War the Choctaws, principally under the leadership of Pushmataha, not only sided with the Americans but contributed 500 men to Andrew Jackson's army (Niles 1-1-1824)
- Although the Creek war was over, the Choctaw contingent would help the Americans in one last battle. In January, 1815, tradition has it that Pushmataha and his warriors, while serving under Andrew Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans, gave a lasting contribution to the English Language. During the battle, Jackson is said to have asked Pushmataha if the fight against the British was going well for the Choctaw detachment. Pushmataha supposedly answered with a Choctaw word which meant that things were all right. Jackson liked the word and began using it himself. The word was OK. According to the Dictionary of Word Origins, the favored source for the symbol OK ". . seems to be the Choctaw word OKEH, it is so" (Shipley). The use is also attributed to President Andrew Jackson among others." [Rufus Ward intimates it may have actually been Pushmataha's nephew who had this reported exchange with Jackson.]


‘I’m OK means ‘I’m fine’. But if you say the weather’s OK in a lazy drawl, it could mean 'so-so'. When you respond with an OK at the end of someone’s explanation, you could be saying, ‘Alright, I get what you’re saying’. And when someone explains that ‘This is the way to do it, OK?’ it means, ‘Have you understood?’

One abbreviation, many meanings. And like all delightful accidents of history, the origin of this multi-faceted OK seems to lie in a humourous misspelling of the words ‘all correct’ as ‘orl korrect’, approximately 170 years ago, in the US.

So says the dictionaries team of the Oxford Word and Language Service (OWLS), whose job it is to answer the queries of curious users of the English language. OWLS was launched by the Oxford University Press in 1983, which periodically publishes a compilation of many such queries. Among those questions is one on the origin of OK.

Many other explanations have been put forth, such as the Greek ola kala ('it is good'), and the French aux Cayes , ('from Cayes', Cayes being a Haitian port known for its good quality rum). Some have also wondered if OK originated from the initials of Obeidah Kelly, a railway freight agent who wrote his initials OK on the documents that he had checked!

‘Orl korrect’ seems to have won because it is supported by documentary evidence. Its earliest recorded use can be found in the Boston Morning Post of March 23, 1839. Though, in the 1840s, supporters of a politician Martin Van Buren formed the OK (Old Kinderhook) Club, named so after the birthplace Kinderhook (New York) of the politician.

In fact, a judicial case of 1935 was decided on the basis of the 'orl korrect' origin of OK! It was a case involving a Japanese rice merchant, Nippon Menkwa Kabushiki Kaesha versus Dawson’s Bank, in the US. The rice merchant had written OK along with his initials on some of the invoices. The case was decided on the basis that OK was to be taken as the full words ‘All Correct’!

Now someone needs to find out how and when OK got modified to Okidokey! Any takers apart from OWLS?






--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-07-05 11:47:28 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Другие линки, уже без цитат:

http://www.npr.org/programs/morning/features/patc/ok/index.h...

http://phrases.shu.ac.uk/bulletin_board/18/messages/520.html

http://www.linguistlist.org/issues/3/3-123.html#3

Хватит вполне, думаю ;)))


    Reference: http://www.ebicom.net/~rsf1/ok.htm
    Reference: http://www.pitara.com/discover/5wh/online.asp?story=178
Kirill Semenov
Ukraine
Local time: 05:05
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 6216
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
окей он и в Африке окей


Explanation:
Американец из Миннисоты, профессор английского в Columbia University, Аллен Волкер Рид решил научно доказать американское происхождение термина OK. С полными основаниями его можно назвать самым выдающимся экспертом в области истории ОК. За свою долгую жизнь в науке Аллен выяснил происхождение многих слов, прежде всего - относящихся к American English. В ходе исследований, связанных со знаменитым слогом, он изучил 12 различных версий. Одна из них была связана с галетами Orrin Kendall, которыми снабжались солдаты Союза во время гражданской войны в Америке. Согласно другой версии, это слово - термин Open Key, используемый в телеграфном языке.
В действительности, доказал Аллен, впервые это слово появилось в сатирической статье о плохой орфографии, опубликованной в газете Boston Morning Post в 1839 году, как ахроним Oll Korrect (а не all correct). В 1840 году оно использовалось как инициалы Old Kinderhook, псевдоним Мартина Ван Бурена, восьмого президента США. В призывах к его так и несостоявшемуся переизбранию его сторонники писали: "Голосуйте за ОК".
Другие исследователи американской истории отмечают, что ОК может иметь более древнее происхождение, чем его появление в Morning Post. Оно может принадлежать американским индейцам, использовавшим термин "okeh" как утвердительный ответ на вопрос.
Кто первым сказал "ОК"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 mins (2003-07-05 11:44:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

okey doke
okey doke
Okey doke is used in the same way as `OK\' to show that you agree to something, or that you want to start talking about something else or doing something else. (INFORMAL, SPOKEN)
Okey doke. I\'ll give you a ring.
CONVENTION also okey dokey

(c) HarperCollins Publishers.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 18 mins (2003-07-05 11:49:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

OK is a term of approval, sometimes written phonetically as okay, or extended to okey dokey or even, thanks to Ned Flanders, okelly dokelly. Originally it was short for \"Oll Korrect\", a deliberate mispelling of \"all correct\", written by a professor for completed school papers he corrected. The first recorded use of \"OK\" was in the Boston Morning Post on March 23, 1839. It has since become a colloquial referent, used everyday among English speakers, and borrowed by non-English speakers.
http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/OK


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 mins (2003-07-05 11:51:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Я в этом и сам был уверен, но вот подтверждение. Словарь -- это документ:

http://www.macquariedictionary.com.au/p/dictionary/slang-o.h...
okey-doke
adverb yes; all right; okay. Also, okey-dokey. [rhyming reduplication of okay]

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 22 mins (2003-07-05 11:53:18 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

А вот еще словарь. Wordorigins называется:
http://www.wordorigins.org/wordoro.htm#ok
OK
OK is the most successful of all Americanisms. It has invaded hundreds of other languages and been adopted by them as a word. Mencken claims that US troops deployed overseas during WWII found it already in use by Bedouins in the Sahara to the Japanese in the Pacific. It was also the fourth word spoken on the surface of the moon:

Buzz Aldrin: Contact light.
Neil Armstrong: Shutdown.
Aldrin: OK. Engine stop. ACA out of Detent.
Armstrong: Out of Detent. Auto.
Aldrin: Mode Control, both Auto. Descent Engine Command Override, Off. Engine Arm, Off. 413 is in.
Charlie Duke (Houston CapCom): We copy you down, Eagle.
Armstrong: Engine arm is off ... Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.
Duke: Roger, Tranquility. We copy you on the ground. You got a bunch of guys about to turn blue. We\'re breathing again. Thanks a lot.
Despite the term\'s success, however, for years no one was really sure where the word came from. The origin of OK became the Holy Grail of etymology. Finally, in 1963 the Galahad of our story, Dr. Allen Walker Read of Columbia University uncovered the origin.

But first, some of the more popular suggestions as to the origin are as follows. These can all be dismissed because of lack of evidence or because OK predates the events that supposedly led to creation:

It stands for oll korrect, a misspelling of all correct, usually by a famous person, most often Andrew Jackson. This one comes close to the mark, but still misses it.

It stands for Old Kinderhook, the nickname of Martin Van Buren who came from Kinderhook, New York. Old Kinderhook played a role in popularizing the term, but it is not its origin. (More on this later.)

It comes from any one of a number of languages, most often the Choctaw word okeh. This explanation often involves Andrew Jackson again, but this time adopting it from the Indian language not because he was orthographically-challenged. A later president, Woodrow Wilson, favored this explanation, but he was wrong. As far as this explanation goes, it was not suggested until 1885 and no evidence exists that this, or any foreign word, is in fact the origin.

It is an abbreviation for Oberst Kommandant, or Colonel-in-Command, used by Von Steuben or Schliessen (take your pick) during the Revolutionary War. No record of either man, or anyone until 1839, using this phrase exists.

It comes from the French Aux Cayes, a port in Haiti famed for its rum.

It stood for Orrin Kendall crackers supplied to the Union Army during the Civil War. Unfortunately for Orrin\'s immortality, OK was in use twenty years before the Civil War.

It stood for Obadiah Kelly, a railroad shipping clerk akin to Kilroy who initialed bills of lading. And,

That it was an 1860s telegraph term for Open Key.
Of the above explanations, the first comes the closest to being true, but it too is false. Andrew Jackson was a notoriously poor speller. So much so that his spelling became an issue in the 1828 campaign. (Dan Quayle can take heart in the fact that he was not the first.) He is not, however, known to have ever used the expression OK or misspelled \"all correct\" with the two letters in question. The association of the word OK with Jackson, however, is not entirely without foundation. George W. Stimpson\'s Nuggets Of Knowledge, published in 1934 cites a 1790 court record from Sumner County, Tennessee in which Jackson \"proved a bill of sale from Hugh McGary to Gasper Mansker, for a Negro man, which was O.K.\" This was probably just poor penmanship on the part of a court clerk, however. James Parton\'s biography of Jackson suggests that is really an illegible O.R., which was the abbreviation used for Order Recorded.

The incorrect spelling explanation is the correct one. Although the part about Andrew Jackson is almost certainly apocryphal. Allen Walker Read of Columbia University solved the mystery in a series of articles in American Speech in 1963-64. In 1839, a \"frolicsome group,\" as Read describes them, called the Anti-Bell-Ringing Society in Boston started using the term to stand for oll korrect, a facetious misspelling.

The first recorded use of OK was in the spring of 1839 by the Boston Morning Post:

(23 March) He of the Journal...would have the \'contribution box,\' et ceteras, o.k.--all correct--and cause the corks to fly, like sparks, upward.

(26 March) Had the pleasure of taking these \'interesting strangers\' by the hand, and wishing them a speedy passage to the Commercial Emporium, They were o.k.

(10 April) It is hardly necessary to say to those who know Mr. Hughes, that his establishment will be found to be \'A. No. One\'--that is, O.K.--all correct.

By July of that year, the term spread south to New York, and quickly gained wide acceptance:

(27 July, Evening Tattler) These \'wise men from the East\'...are right...to play at bowls with us as long as we are willing to set ourselves up, like skittles, to be knocked down for their amusement and emolument. OK! all correct!
The next year, 1840, New York Democrats formed an organization called the OK Club. The name of the club stood for Old Kinderhook as Martin Van Buren was running for reelection that year. Since the term was in use prior to the formation of the OK Club, it seems likely that the name of the club was due in part due to the phrase, not vice versa. The activities of the OK Club, however, undoubtedly contributed to the popularity of OK even if not providing the origin.

The variant A-OK first appeared during NASA\'s Mercury program of the 1960s. It may be a combination of A-One with OK. Tom Wolfe in The Right Stuff, however, claims that it was originally used by Shorty Powers, the \"Voice of Mercury Control,\" in radio transmissions because the \"A\" sound cut through static better than the \"O\".



Yuri Smirnov
Local time: 05:05
Native speaker of: Native in BelarusianBelarusian, Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 3861
Grading comment
spasibo VSEM
OSOBENNO YURIYU I KIRILU ZA VARIANTI ...
MODERATORAM;; MOJET TAKOYE BIT CHTO 2 OTVETA KLASNIYE ????
ESLI DA TO POCHEMU NE VVESTI PO 4 BALA ?????
DVUM ANSWERAV

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vents Villers
3 hrs
  -> Спасибо

agree  xxxOleg Pashuk: the most popular version: misspelled "all correct"
5 hrs
  -> Спасибо

agree  Will Matter: but 'okey dokey'.
7 hrs
  -> It's there. Scroll up, please.

agree  huntr
1 day4 hrs
  -> Спасибо
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