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XLR

Russian translation: разъем стандарта XLR

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:XLR
Russian translation:разъем стандарта XLR
Entered by: Yelena Kurashova
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

12:54 Mar 19, 2002
English to Russian translations [Non-PRO]
Tech/Engineering
English term or phrase: XLR
8 mono input channels with gold-plated XLRs and phone connectors

from mixer user's manual
alpach
Local time: 13:34
разъем стандарта XLR
Explanation:
Это название стандарта разъема, на русский язык не переводится. См. о происхождении термина ниже:

Walkabout's Sound 101.3: Cables & Connectors
... For the trivia fans: The term "XLR" originated as an abbreviation for "Shield,
Left, Right". The two signal wires are no longer used for a Left and Right ...
http://www.walkaboutclearwater.org/sound101/cables.html
More Results From: www.walkaboutclearwater.org

И еще о самом разъеме:

What is an XLR connector? Many connectors are used in the audiovisual indus-try. Each is generally recognized for the type of signal the cable carries. The XLR connector is commonly used for carrying audio signals. CannonTM (now ITT-CannonTM) originated and re-fined the XLR connector more than 20 years ago. The three pin version of the XLR connector has de-veloped into the international standard connector for microphones as well as professional balanced line level audio signals. Today, many variations of the XLR can be found. They are found with as few as two and as many as seven pins and are manufactured by ITT CannonTM, SwitchcraftTM, NeutrikTM and others. By far, the most com-mon XLR connector has three pins. XLR con-nectors made by different manufacturers are compatible with each other. What is the correct pin-out? There has been an ongoing debate about the proper connection protocol for the XLR connec-tor. There are no hard fast enforceable rules that a manufacturer must follow. One equipment manu-facturer may wire the "high" (+) signal on their con-nector pin #2 while another may look for the same signal on its' pin #3. The Audio Engineering Soci-ety (AES) and the Electronic Industries Alliance (EIA) have developed standards that most manu-facturers now follow. The AES and EIA standards state that pin #1 is ground, pin #2 is high (+) and pin #3 is low (-). Since some manufacturers follow their own methods, it is imperative that the techni-cian verify specific pin out for each equipment item prior to termination and connection. The SwitchcraftTM A3M is a common cable terminated microphone connector. Please only attempt to practice the skills set forth in these materials under the supervision of a knowledgeable adult. ICIA is not responsible for any use or application of the knowledge or skills learned in ICIA -sponsored educational programs. ICIA does not warrant or guarantee the job performance of any individual who participates in ICIA -sponsored educational programs and/or is awarded an ICIA certification.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 2
As stated earlier, the most common use in the AV industry for the XLR connector is for audio circuits. Audio is an electronic representation of sound. The microphone is the most common piece of equipment where many have seen an XLR connec-tor. Microphones create very, very small electrical signals. Sometimes, these signals must travel great distances before reaching the electronic com-ponents to which they are to be connected. Balanced lines In order to travel long distances without de-structive interference, professional micro-phones use a balanced audio circuit. A bal-anced line consists of three paths of current flow. The cable has a pair of twisted wires with a shield covering them. The twisted pair would carry the actual audio signal while the overall shield acts as a noise absorbing barrier. The shield is typically connected to a ground for the circuit. An audio signal is transmitted down each conductor of a balanced twisted pair in the form of a sine wave. These signals are exactly 180° out of phase. As the signal on one wire goes high, the signal on the other wire is acting as a mirror image, going low. Electronically, both signals represent the exact same sound. This method of signal transmission helps the signal to get to its destination with minimal disruption. Making the connection A 3-pin XLR may take on different forms ranging from a rectangular chassis mount jack to a right angle plug. Most common are the straight connec-tors intended to terminate on the end of a cable. These have a large area to grip as the connectors are mated. As with other connector sets, these come in two complementary units; male and female. Make sure you are installing the correct gender connector on the cable prior to finishing your best solder job ever. XLR connectors are disassembled prior to termination. The connectors are made to break The NeutrikTM RC Series is used in special circumstances where space is not available for a long connector body. An example of stranded twisted pair with a foil shield and drain wire.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 3
down into three or four smaller pieces for soldering to the cable. We will describe the use of the Neu-trik NC3FDL connector in this narrative. Other manufacturers use similar steps. The Neutrik NC3FDL is made up of four discrete pieces: the cable boot, the cable clamp, the pin/socket assembly and the connector shell. Disas-semble your connector and ensure you have all of the components. Start by sliding the cable boot over the cable followed by the cable clamp. Make sure that these are oriented so that they will reas-semble with the other two connector components once you are finished. Now slide on a small piece, about 3/4" long (20 mm), of heat shrinkable tubing over the end of the cable. For this demonstration, we are shown using West Penn 533 cable. This cable is typically used for hand held microphones because of its flexibility and durability. There are two types of shielding techniques. The West Penn 533 cable uses a tightly woven braid of very fine copper wire. The other technique of shielding uses an overall foil wrap with an un-insulated wire used as the conduc-tor for the foil shield. This conductor is commonly referred to as the drain wire. The foil shielded au-dio cable is typically used in fixed installations where flexibility is not a requirement. (West Penn 291 would be a complementary fixed installation cable to the West Penn 533.) Carefully strip about one inch (25 mm) of the outer jacket away from the audio cable. Be extra cau-tious that you do not cut the braid. Carefully un-braid the shield and twist it several times, shaping it into the third conductor. Now, it is time to strip off about 1/4" (5 mm) of the insulator of each of the twisted pair conductors. Again, be careful that you do not cut too deep and damage the stranded conductors under the insula-tor. It is best to practice stripping a few wires be-fore preparing an end for termination. If the strands are damaged, you must trim back all the As you cut off the outer jacket, do not cut the inner conductors. Twist the braided shield to form the third conductor. Trim off the insulating jacket from the twisted pair wires.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 4
conductors evenly and begin again. Insert the stripped cable into a small vise and prepare to tin the wires. Follow proper solder-ing precautions and procedures to tin all three of the conductors. Try not to allow much wick-ing to occur. (wicking is the phenomenon where solder travels up the wire and under the insulating jacket. The cable can break under the jacket causing a hidden fault that is hard to locate). Remove the cable from the vise and replace it with the pin/socket assembly of the connector. The three pins should also be tinned on the con-nector. Flow the solder into the cups so that they have a slight concave appearance. Do not overheat or overfill the cups. Identify the pin number designations on the connector. Connect the shield first to pin #1 by reheating the solder cup and inserting the pre-tinned conductor. Use needle nose pliers to hold the wire while soldering and complete the operation. In the same manner, solder the twisted pair to pin #2 and #3 using the red or blue wire for pin #2 as the "high" (+) portion of the signal and the clear or white or black wire for pin #3, the "low" (-) side of the signal. Remember our pin out discussion. Verify with the manual of the equipment you are working with that it operates with the standard pin configuration. If not, you must adjust the termination that connects to that piece of equipment. It is a good practice to indicate by labeling that a certain connector is wired in a non-standard manner. Inspect the connections closely under good light. Look for cold or incomplete solder joints. Correct any deficiencies before moving on. Verify the integrity of the cable by checking with a multi-meter. Ensure that you have continuity Ensure your connection is inspected before using the heat shrink. Pre-tinning stranded wire can help prevent frayed wires and possible shorts. Be careful not to overheat or overfill the solder cups on the connector. Solder the shield to pin #1.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 5
from each pin to its respective complement at the opposite end of the cable. After continuity checks, verify there are no shorts by measur-ing from each pin to the others. Slide the heat shrink over the area where you stripped the original cable jacket. Heat the heat shrink to complete the dressing. Now, slide the connector shell over the pin/socket assembly. Slide the cable clamp over the heat shrink and then bring the cable boot up and screw it together with the connector shell. This action will cause the cable clamp to grip the heat shrink and cable to prevent damage to the solder joints if the cable is tugged. Use your multi-meter to check there are no shorts between the connector shell and any of the pins. Following these procedures will ensure you create quality terminations that will remain trou-ble free for a very long time. The International Communications Industries Association, Inc.®(ICIA®) is the premier international trade association representing dealers, manufacturers, design consultants, independent representatives, end-users and other com-panies and individuals in the audiovisual industry. ICIA® is the audiovisual industry's leading training and professional development resource. 11242 Waples Mill Road * Suite 200 * Fairfax, VA 22030 * USA * 703.273.7200 * FAX 703.278.8082 * www.infocomm.org Carefully reassemble your connector, making sure the wires are not damaged. Check your cable connections with a meter.

Это по адресу: http://www.infocomm.org/content/downloads/Careers_Terminatin...
Selected response from:

Yelena Kurashova
Local time: 20:34
Grading comment
Thank you.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2разъем XLRAnna Launay
5соединитель XLR
Olga1204
5разъем стандарта XLRYelena Kurashova


  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
разъем XLR


Explanation:
на русский язык не переводится

Anna Launay
France
Local time: 19:34
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 110

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ludwig Chekhovtsov: коммутационный разъем XLR
1 min
  -> Спасибо

agree  Nikita Kobrin
11 mins
  -> Спасибо
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
разъем стандарта XLR


Explanation:
Это название стандарта разъема, на русский язык не переводится. См. о происхождении термина ниже:

Walkabout's Sound 101.3: Cables & Connectors
... For the trivia fans: The term "XLR" originated as an abbreviation for "Shield,
Left, Right". The two signal wires are no longer used for a Left and Right ...
http://www.walkaboutclearwater.org/sound101/cables.html
More Results From: www.walkaboutclearwater.org

И еще о самом разъеме:

What is an XLR connector? Many connectors are used in the audiovisual indus-try. Each is generally recognized for the type of signal the cable carries. The XLR connector is commonly used for carrying audio signals. CannonTM (now ITT-CannonTM) originated and re-fined the XLR connector more than 20 years ago. The three pin version of the XLR connector has de-veloped into the international standard connector for microphones as well as professional balanced line level audio signals. Today, many variations of the XLR can be found. They are found with as few as two and as many as seven pins and are manufactured by ITT CannonTM, SwitchcraftTM, NeutrikTM and others. By far, the most com-mon XLR connector has three pins. XLR con-nectors made by different manufacturers are compatible with each other. What is the correct pin-out? There has been an ongoing debate about the proper connection protocol for the XLR connec-tor. There are no hard fast enforceable rules that a manufacturer must follow. One equipment manu-facturer may wire the "high" (+) signal on their con-nector pin #2 while another may look for the same signal on its' pin #3. The Audio Engineering Soci-ety (AES) and the Electronic Industries Alliance (EIA) have developed standards that most manu-facturers now follow. The AES and EIA standards state that pin #1 is ground, pin #2 is high (+) and pin #3 is low (-). Since some manufacturers follow their own methods, it is imperative that the techni-cian verify specific pin out for each equipment item prior to termination and connection. The SwitchcraftTM A3M is a common cable terminated microphone connector. Please only attempt to practice the skills set forth in these materials under the supervision of a knowledgeable adult. ICIA is not responsible for any use or application of the knowledge or skills learned in ICIA -sponsored educational programs. ICIA does not warrant or guarantee the job performance of any individual who participates in ICIA -sponsored educational programs and/or is awarded an ICIA certification.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 2
As stated earlier, the most common use in the AV industry for the XLR connector is for audio circuits. Audio is an electronic representation of sound. The microphone is the most common piece of equipment where many have seen an XLR connec-tor. Microphones create very, very small electrical signals. Sometimes, these signals must travel great distances before reaching the electronic com-ponents to which they are to be connected. Balanced lines In order to travel long distances without de-structive interference, professional micro-phones use a balanced audio circuit. A bal-anced line consists of three paths of current flow. The cable has a pair of twisted wires with a shield covering them. The twisted pair would carry the actual audio signal while the overall shield acts as a noise absorbing barrier. The shield is typically connected to a ground for the circuit. An audio signal is transmitted down each conductor of a balanced twisted pair in the form of a sine wave. These signals are exactly 180° out of phase. As the signal on one wire goes high, the signal on the other wire is acting as a mirror image, going low. Electronically, both signals represent the exact same sound. This method of signal transmission helps the signal to get to its destination with minimal disruption. Making the connection A 3-pin XLR may take on different forms ranging from a rectangular chassis mount jack to a right angle plug. Most common are the straight connec-tors intended to terminate on the end of a cable. These have a large area to grip as the connectors are mated. As with other connector sets, these come in two complementary units; male and female. Make sure you are installing the correct gender connector on the cable prior to finishing your best solder job ever. XLR connectors are disassembled prior to termination. The connectors are made to break The NeutrikTM RC Series is used in special circumstances where space is not available for a long connector body. An example of stranded twisted pair with a foil shield and drain wire.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 3
down into three or four smaller pieces for soldering to the cable. We will describe the use of the Neu-trik NC3FDL connector in this narrative. Other manufacturers use similar steps. The Neutrik NC3FDL is made up of four discrete pieces: the cable boot, the cable clamp, the pin/socket assembly and the connector shell. Disas-semble your connector and ensure you have all of the components. Start by sliding the cable boot over the cable followed by the cable clamp. Make sure that these are oriented so that they will reas-semble with the other two connector components once you are finished. Now slide on a small piece, about 3/4" long (20 mm), of heat shrinkable tubing over the end of the cable. For this demonstration, we are shown using West Penn 533 cable. This cable is typically used for hand held microphones because of its flexibility and durability. There are two types of shielding techniques. The West Penn 533 cable uses a tightly woven braid of very fine copper wire. The other technique of shielding uses an overall foil wrap with an un-insulated wire used as the conduc-tor for the foil shield. This conductor is commonly referred to as the drain wire. The foil shielded au-dio cable is typically used in fixed installations where flexibility is not a requirement. (West Penn 291 would be a complementary fixed installation cable to the West Penn 533.) Carefully strip about one inch (25 mm) of the outer jacket away from the audio cable. Be extra cau-tious that you do not cut the braid. Carefully un-braid the shield and twist it several times, shaping it into the third conductor. Now, it is time to strip off about 1/4" (5 mm) of the insulator of each of the twisted pair conductors. Again, be careful that you do not cut too deep and damage the stranded conductors under the insula-tor. It is best to practice stripping a few wires be-fore preparing an end for termination. If the strands are damaged, you must trim back all the As you cut off the outer jacket, do not cut the inner conductors. Twist the braided shield to form the third conductor. Trim off the insulating jacket from the twisted pair wires.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 4
conductors evenly and begin again. Insert the stripped cable into a small vise and prepare to tin the wires. Follow proper solder-ing precautions and procedures to tin all three of the conductors. Try not to allow much wick-ing to occur. (wicking is the phenomenon where solder travels up the wire and under the insulating jacket. The cable can break under the jacket causing a hidden fault that is hard to locate). Remove the cable from the vise and replace it with the pin/socket assembly of the connector. The three pins should also be tinned on the con-nector. Flow the solder into the cups so that they have a slight concave appearance. Do not overheat or overfill the cups. Identify the pin number designations on the connector. Connect the shield first to pin #1 by reheating the solder cup and inserting the pre-tinned conductor. Use needle nose pliers to hold the wire while soldering and complete the operation. In the same manner, solder the twisted pair to pin #2 and #3 using the red or blue wire for pin #2 as the "high" (+) portion of the signal and the clear or white or black wire for pin #3, the "low" (-) side of the signal. Remember our pin out discussion. Verify with the manual of the equipment you are working with that it operates with the standard pin configuration. If not, you must adjust the termination that connects to that piece of equipment. It is a good practice to indicate by labeling that a certain connector is wired in a non-standard manner. Inspect the connections closely under good light. Look for cold or incomplete solder joints. Correct any deficiencies before moving on. Verify the integrity of the cable by checking with a multi-meter. Ensure that you have continuity Ensure your connection is inspected before using the heat shrink. Pre-tinning stranded wire can help prevent frayed wires and possible shorts. Be careful not to overheat or overfill the solder cups on the connector. Solder the shield to pin #1.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 5
from each pin to its respective complement at the opposite end of the cable. After continuity checks, verify there are no shorts by measur-ing from each pin to the others. Slide the heat shrink over the area where you stripped the original cable jacket. Heat the heat shrink to complete the dressing. Now, slide the connector shell over the pin/socket assembly. Slide the cable clamp over the heat shrink and then bring the cable boot up and screw it together with the connector shell. This action will cause the cable clamp to grip the heat shrink and cable to prevent damage to the solder joints if the cable is tugged. Use your multi-meter to check there are no shorts between the connector shell and any of the pins. Following these procedures will ensure you create quality terminations that will remain trou-ble free for a very long time. The International Communications Industries Association, Inc.®(ICIA®) is the premier international trade association representing dealers, manufacturers, design consultants, independent representatives, end-users and other com-panies and individuals in the audiovisual industry. ICIA® is the audiovisual industry's leading training and professional development resource. 11242 Waples Mill Road * Suite 200 * Fairfax, VA 22030 * USA * 703.273.7200 * FAX 703.278.8082 * www.infocomm.org Carefully reassemble your connector, making sure the wires are not damaged. Check your cable connections with a meter.

Это по адресу: http://www.infocomm.org/content/downloads/Careers_Terminatin...

Yelena Kurashova
Local time: 20:34
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in UkrainianUkrainian
PRO pts in pair: 51
Grading comment
Thank you.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

28 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
соединитель XLR


Explanation:
XLR Extra Long Run (audio connector)
XLR Extra Low Resistance
XLR Ground Left Right (digital audio)
(acronymfinder.com)

Та информация, которая в интернете есть на русском - обычно перевод не дается,остается сокращение латинскими буквами.


    Reference: http://www.acronymfinder.com
Olga1204
United States
Local time: 13:34
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in UkrainianUkrainian
PRO pts in pair: 124
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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