KudoZ home » English to Spanish » Cinema, Film, TV, Drama

Pay vig

Spanish translation: pagar intereses (muy altos)

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
09:26 Oct 31, 2006
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
Cinema, Film, TV, Drama
English term or phrase: Pay vig
I guess, it must be slang, because of the context of the film. However I am not sure, whether it could mean "paying with interests", can anyone help?

thanks very much
Teresa Agost Porcar
Local time: 00:34
Spanish translation:pagar intereses (muy altos)
Explanation:
Mira lo que he encontrado....
No sé si es válido en tu contexto. Es que tampoco das mucho!
Saludo,

Yaiza

Dear Word Detective: Where did the word "vig" come from? As to its usage, it is understood to mean a percentage of a financial deal. -- John Wong, via the internet.

Well, that's one way to define "vig," though I doubt that most folks who have to pay "vig" would describe the process so dispassionately.

"Vig" is short for "vigorish," and it's usually used to mean the exorbitant interest (also known as "juice") that Mafia loan sharks charge their victims, which often runs to 20 percent or more. Per week, that is.

Extended (and less menacing) senses of "vig" include the cut taken by a casino from a customer's winnings, or the "service charge" similarly deducted by a bookie. But "vig" has stayed pretty close to its Mob roots, so if you find yourself discussing financing your small business with a guy in a shiny suit who keeps talking about "the vig," don't say I didn't warn youse.

Though "vigorish" is a staple of Mob slang, it's not an Italian word -- it's Yiddish, from the Russian word "vyigrysh," meaning "gain or winnings." U.S. mobsters may have picked up the term from the "Kosher Mafia" of Meyer Lansky, who welded Italian Mafiosi and Jewish gangsters into a nationwide crime syndicate in the 1930's.

Even the crafty Lansky, however, could never have imagined that someday there'd be a Vigorish Calculator web page (http://www.gotti.com/loanshark.html) to help cyber-suckers figure out their weekly "vig" payments.

Selected response from:

Y. Peraza
Local time: 00:34
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
3 +2pagar intereses (muy altos)
Y. Peraza
5con intereses
M. Luz Gorricho
3 +1pagar comisión
momo savino


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
pay vig
pagar intereses (muy altos)


Explanation:
Mira lo que he encontrado....
No sé si es válido en tu contexto. Es que tampoco das mucho!
Saludo,

Yaiza

Dear Word Detective: Where did the word "vig" come from? As to its usage, it is understood to mean a percentage of a financial deal. -- John Wong, via the internet.

Well, that's one way to define "vig," though I doubt that most folks who have to pay "vig" would describe the process so dispassionately.

"Vig" is short for "vigorish," and it's usually used to mean the exorbitant interest (also known as "juice") that Mafia loan sharks charge their victims, which often runs to 20 percent or more. Per week, that is.

Extended (and less menacing) senses of "vig" include the cut taken by a casino from a customer's winnings, or the "service charge" similarly deducted by a bookie. But "vig" has stayed pretty close to its Mob roots, so if you find yourself discussing financing your small business with a guy in a shiny suit who keeps talking about "the vig," don't say I didn't warn youse.

Though "vigorish" is a staple of Mob slang, it's not an Italian word -- it's Yiddish, from the Russian word "vyigrysh," meaning "gain or winnings." U.S. mobsters may have picked up the term from the "Kosher Mafia" of Meyer Lansky, who welded Italian Mafiosi and Jewish gangsters into a nationwide crime syndicate in the 1930's.

Even the crafty Lansky, however, could never have imagined that someday there'd be a Vigorish Calculator web page (http://www.gotti.com/loanshark.html) to help cyber-suckers figure out their weekly "vig" payments.




    Reference: http://www.word-detective.com/052699.html
Y. Peraza
Local time: 00:34
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 24
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Muchas gracias ;P


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Egmont
45 mins

agree  silviantonia: El vig son intereses de usura; son ilegales.
3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
pay vig
con intereses


Explanation:
Así lo dicen en Los Soprano ;D
Buena suerte

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2006-10-31 11:28:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Se utiliza en el ámbito de los usureros/prestamistas

M. Luz Gorricho
Spain
Local time: 00:34
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Spanish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
pay vig
pagar comisión


Explanation:
The vig is a fairly common term in gambling circles. Short for vigorish, it means "a charge paid on a bet, as to a bookie." (In Alson's bookmaking operation, the vig is 10% of all losing bets--winning bets are paid off in full.) A related sense is "interest paid to a loanshark." Vigorish, which is first found in America just past the turn of the century, is probably a borrowing of a Russian or Ukranian word meaning "profit" or "winnings"; vig itself is a more recent shortening.


Example sentence(s):
  • comisión pagada en caso de apuestas

    Reference: http://www.google.com
momo savino
Switzerland
Local time: 00:34
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cándida Artime
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search