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final class of degree

Spanish translation: grado/licenciatura (se le ha concedido/otorgado or ha recibido el título de)

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11:51 Oct 26, 2006
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
Education / Pedagogy
English term or phrase: final class of degree
En un "Disclosure of University Examination Marks" de la Universidad de Aberystwyth aparece, al final del documento, tras los nombres de las asignaturas y sus calificaciones, lo siguiente:

**Final Class of Degree**: MSc Econ. in Information and Library Studies, Awarded June 1998.

Gracias!!!!
*:-) Marta
Marta Mozo
Spain
Local time: 13:12
Spanish translation:grado/licenciatura (se le ha concedido/otorgado or ha recibido el título de)
Explanation:
From what I could find on the Bologna Process, the idea is to create a 3 cycle system similar to the Anglo/Commonwealth/US system of bachelors/masters/doctorate. Assuming that "grado" signifies the completion of the first cycle, and "licenciatura" the completion of the second, I assume that English-speaking countries will continues with the bachelor's-masters terminology to show that the student completed the first two cycles. It is possible to complete a masters in the UK in four years, and the first degree for law students in England takes three years, so the time frame is not incompatible with current English academic standards. That said, a four year masters would never fly in the US, and most Mexican licenciaturas, which take five years, instead of four, are considered the rough equivalent of a US bachelors, not of a masters. If I were trying to translate a Mexican licenciatura, I would annote the term bachelors, to note the extra year of study and the fact that it is considered a professional degree. In translating the Bologna Process "grado" and "licenciatura", if your audience is US or Canadian, I would annotate the term to reflect the actual amount of study completed, as many US institutions may not consider the licenciatura to be the equivalent of a US masters, no matter what the EU says. For that matter, as Mexico grants post "licenciatura" masters degrees, I doubt that a Mexican university would accept a licenciatura as a masters either.
Selected response from:

Rooney
United States

Note from asker to answerer
Thanks for the info. I've decided against calling the latter a Master's as this would mean renaming what I currently call a Master's (which is a 4+1 degree). I don't think the four-year qualification is to do with Bologna; I think it's to compensate people that still want to take a four year course.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer


Selected response from:

Robert Copeland
United States
Local time: 07:12
Grading comment
Gracias!!
*:-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3grado/licenciatura (se le ha concedido/otorgado or ha recibido el título de)
Robert Copeland


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
grado/licenciatura (se le ha concedido/otorgado or ha recibido el título de)


Explanation:
From what I could find on the Bologna Process, the idea is to create a 3 cycle system similar to the Anglo/Commonwealth/US system of bachelors/masters/doctorate. Assuming that "grado" signifies the completion of the first cycle, and "licenciatura" the completion of the second, I assume that English-speaking countries will continues with the bachelor's-masters terminology to show that the student completed the first two cycles. It is possible to complete a masters in the UK in four years, and the first degree for law students in England takes three years, so the time frame is not incompatible with current English academic standards. That said, a four year masters would never fly in the US, and most Mexican licenciaturas, which take five years, instead of four, are considered the rough equivalent of a US bachelors, not of a masters. If I were trying to translate a Mexican licenciatura, I would annote the term bachelors, to note the extra year of study and the fact that it is considered a professional degree. In translating the Bologna Process "grado" and "licenciatura", if your audience is US or Canadian, I would annotate the term to reflect the actual amount of study completed, as many US institutions may not consider the licenciatura to be the equivalent of a US masters, no matter what the EU says. For that matter, as Mexico grants post "licenciatura" masters degrees, I doubt that a Mexican university would accept a licenciatura as a masters either.
Selected response from:

Rooney
United States

Note from asker to answerer
Thanks for the info. I've decided against calling the latter a Master's as this would mean renaming what I currently call a Master's (which is a 4+1 degree). I don't think the four-year qualification is to do with Bologna; I think it's to compensate people that still want to take a four year course.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer




Robert Copeland
United States
Local time: 07:12
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 142
Grading comment
Gracias!!
*:-)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  NC translators: agree
29 mins
  -> thanks!!

agree  Lydia De Jorge
1 day2 hrs

agree  Annissa 7ar
1 day13 hrs
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