KudoZ home » English to Spanish » Law (general)

Indorsement of Service

Spanish translation: declaración de haber emplazado al demandado

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Indorsement of Service
Spanish translation:declaración de haber emplazado al demandado
Entered by: Margarita Ezquerra (Smart Translators, S.L.)
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

08:53 Jul 13, 2008
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general)
English term or phrase: Indorsement of Service
INDORSEMENT OF SERVICE

This summons was served by me at XX on the defendant on day the ___ day of __

Indorsed the day of XXX

(Signed) (Address)

Muchas gracias por cualquier sugerencia. Feliz día!!!
Margarita Ezquerra (Smart Translators, S.L.)
Spain
Local time: 22:47
declaración de haber emplazado al demandado
Explanation:
This appears to be a process server's indorsement or declaration that he has served (delivered) a summons to a named defendant (also called "affidavit of service" in some jurisdictions.) If this is for Spain and this refers to actual "service of process" commencing civil proceedings against the defendant, you might also translate this as "declaración de haber notificado la demanda," since "service of process" is "notificación de la demanda".

This does not appear to be the defendant's "acuse de recibo" acknowledging that he has received the summons, but rather the process server's indorsement indicating that he has effectively served process, i.e., delivered the summons ("notificado la demanda") to the defendant:

The summons was served by me on the defendant = declaro haber emplazado al demandado (or) notificado la demanda al demandado

For info concerning endorse/indorse, in legal contexts "indorse" is usually the preferred American spelling; "endorse" is British usage:

"The usual spelling in non-legal contexts is "endorse." That is the only acceptable spelling when used figuratively to mean "to express approval of." In legal senses relating to negotiable instruments "indorse" predominates in the U.S., and the word is so spelled throughout the Uniform Commercial Code. In Great Britain, however, "endorse" is the more frequent spelling, even in the context of commerial paper."

(From: Bryan A. Garner, "A Dictionary of Modern Legal Usage", 2nd ed. Oxford University Press, 1995, p. 315.)
Selected response from:

Rebecca Jowers
Spain
Local time: 22:47
Grading comment
Esta es la que más se aproxima. Mil gracias a todos
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +2Aprobación (o consentimiento) de servicios
Ricardo Galarza
5 +1acuse de reciboGLENN MCBRIDE WITHENSHAW
5declaración de haber emplazado al demandadoRebecca Jowers


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
indorsement of service
Aprobación (o consentimiento) de servicios


Explanation:
Tu original tiene un error gramatical. Se refiere a "endorsement", con "e", cuya traducción en documentos financieros, sería "endosado" (endosar un cheque, una letra de cambio u otro documento financiero); firmado al dorso pues, con lo cual uno cede los derechos sobre ese documento a la orden de un tercero.

Pero en tu caso no aplica endosar/endosado, ya que en derecho, se utliza "endorsement" en su acepción de "approval"; es decir, aprobación, consentimiento, permiso, etc.

Suerte!

Ricardo Galarza
Uruguay
Local time: 17:47
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 56

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  kaori.t: Indorsement y Endorsement seem to be the same. FYI, someone explains it here: http://jpn.proz.com/kudoz/english_to_german/law_general/9823...
3 mins
  -> Gracias, Kaori. En efecto, son las dos variantes, pero con "i" ha caído en peligroso desuso, por eso todos los diccionarios, la ponen como secundaria.

agree  Egmont
8 hrs
  -> Gracias, AVRM. Un saludo :)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
indorsement of service
acuse de recibo


Explanation:
endorsement of service - means that the person signed that he was served legal papers

The document is entitled "Endorsement of Service" which could be substituted perfectly with the title "Acuse de Recibo"

GLENN MCBRIDE WITHENSHAW
Mexico
Local time: 15:47
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 11

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nelida Kreer: Of course. Excellent.
1 day20 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
indorsement of service
declaración de haber emplazado al demandado


Explanation:
This appears to be a process server's indorsement or declaration that he has served (delivered) a summons to a named defendant (also called "affidavit of service" in some jurisdictions.) If this is for Spain and this refers to actual "service of process" commencing civil proceedings against the defendant, you might also translate this as "declaración de haber notificado la demanda," since "service of process" is "notificación de la demanda".

This does not appear to be the defendant's "acuse de recibo" acknowledging that he has received the summons, but rather the process server's indorsement indicating that he has effectively served process, i.e., delivered the summons ("notificado la demanda") to the defendant:

The summons was served by me on the defendant = declaro haber emplazado al demandado (or) notificado la demanda al demandado

For info concerning endorse/indorse, in legal contexts "indorse" is usually the preferred American spelling; "endorse" is British usage:

"The usual spelling in non-legal contexts is "endorse." That is the only acceptable spelling when used figuratively to mean "to express approval of." In legal senses relating to negotiable instruments "indorse" predominates in the U.S., and the word is so spelled throughout the Uniform Commercial Code. In Great Britain, however, "endorse" is the more frequent spelling, even in the context of commerial paper."

(From: Bryan A. Garner, "A Dictionary of Modern Legal Usage", 2nd ed. Oxford University Press, 1995, p. 315.)

Rebecca Jowers
Spain
Local time: 22:47
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 403
Grading comment
Esta es la que más se aproxima. Mil gracias a todos
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search