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SS

Spanish translation: omit

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:SS
Spanish translation:omit
Entered by: A Hayes
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

03:18 Apr 1, 2002
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
English term or phrase: SS
State of New York
SS
County of New York

The above appears in a Limited Power of Attorney Document. I´m wondering if it is not an abbreviation for State and Seat (as is seat of government) I am also wondering if I need to translate it at all or can just leave it out. Legal translations are still new to me.
Bret
Local time: 00:12
SS
Explanation:
This same question was posted a few weeks ago. Here are the answers then suggested. They should be in the glossary-

S.S.: Garner’s A Dictionary of Modern Legal Usage (Oxford University Press, 1995) has a most interesting article on this acronym. I copy below an extract of it: “Many possible etymologies have been suggested for this mysterious abbreviation. One is that it signifies scilicet (= namely, to wit) (…). Mellinkoff suggests that the precise etymology is unknown: “Lawyers have been using ss for nine hundred years and still are not sure what it means.” (…) American lawyers have puzzled over its meaning and have even wasted time litigating whether it is necessary in affidavits (…) There are no judicious uses of this legalism.” Following Garner’s advice, I omit it in my translations. Best regards, Manuel Ref: given above
I have read also that it means “sworn statement”; Garner says that “In fact, though, it is a flourish deriving from the Year Books –an equivalent of the paragraph mark: “”.
see http://www.idsos.state.id.us/notary/handbook.pdf: s.s. is the latin word "Scilicet" meaning "in particular" or "namely".
It´s an old use of red tape docs. Common practice (in Argentina) omits it directly. Hope it helps.
It means "namely", but it is omitted.
Selected response from:

A Hayes
Australia
Local time: 15:12
Grading comment
Thanks. I am going to a omit it in my translation as well.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3Sépase
Luis Rey Ballesteros (Luiroi)
5 +2SSA Hayes
4 +1...clarification...
Ramón Solá
5SSA Hayes
4no creo que sea "to wit" (a saber)Aurora Humarán
4it stands forwrtransco


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Sépase


Explanation:
ése es el significado

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Note added at 2002-04-01 03:40:01 (GMT)
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Derived from latin word \"Scilicet\"... to wit; namely.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-04-01 03:42:31 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

some history:
Some suggest that it stands for \"Scilicet\", also a Latin word meaning \"namely\", \"to wit\". \"Scilicet\" is certainly found in the old Court Rolls and \"To Wit\" is found in legal documents at the present time. On the other hand, it has been suggested that when writing out a legal document in times past, a legal clerk with his quill pen made a flourish looking rather like a Greek letter `b\' (Beta), which was how the letters \"SS\" were written in those days. In fact in old German script the double `s\' was also written in this way and one still finds it nowadays. Knowing how people concerned with legal matters love to follow precedent, it could very well be that other clerks used the document as a precedent and faithfully copied the flourish, but wrote it as \"SS\", without checking what it represented. I wonder how many people in Jamaica these days still faithfully use \"Jamaica SS\" on documents without having the slightest idea what it means. www.nsdco.com/pdffiles/newsletter1.pdf ss means court&hl=es

Luis Rey Ballesteros (Luiroi)
Local time: 00:12
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 5081

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Atenea Acevedo: también "a saber"
16 mins
  -> de acuerdo... también a saber...

agree  David Davis
49 mins
  -> Gracias, ddavis

agree  Arancha Otero
9 hrs
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
SS


Explanation:
This same question was posted a few weeks ago. Here are the answers then suggested. They should be in the glossary-

S.S.: Garner’s A Dictionary of Modern Legal Usage (Oxford University Press, 1995) has a most interesting article on this acronym. I copy below an extract of it: “Many possible etymologies have been suggested for this mysterious abbreviation. One is that it signifies scilicet (= namely, to wit) (…). Mellinkoff suggests that the precise etymology is unknown: “Lawyers have been using ss for nine hundred years and still are not sure what it means.” (…) American lawyers have puzzled over its meaning and have even wasted time litigating whether it is necessary in affidavits (…) There are no judicious uses of this legalism.” Following Garner’s advice, I omit it in my translations. Best regards, Manuel Ref: given above
I have read also that it means “sworn statement”; Garner says that “In fact, though, it is a flourish deriving from the Year Books –an equivalent of the paragraph mark: “”.
see http://www.idsos.state.id.us/notary/handbook.pdf: s.s. is the latin word "Scilicet" meaning "in particular" or "namely".
It´s an old use of red tape docs. Common practice (in Argentina) omits it directly. Hope it helps.
It means "namely", but it is omitted.


A Hayes
Australia
Local time: 15:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 100
Grading comment
Thanks. I am going to a omit it in my translation as well.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Davis
33 mins
  -> thanks

agree  Nancy Cepeda
1 hr
  -> thanks
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
SS


Explanation:
This same question was posted a few weeks ago. Here are the answers then suggested. They should be in the glossary-

S.S.: Garner’s A Dictionary of Modern Legal Usage (Oxford University Press, 1995) has a most interesting article on this acronym. I copy below an extract of it: “Many possible etymologies have been suggested for this mysterious abbreviation. One is that it signifies scilicet (= namely, to wit) (…). Mellinkoff suggests that the precise etymology is unknown: “Lawyers have been using ss for nine hundred years and still are not sure what it means.” (…) American lawyers have puzzled over its meaning and have even wasted time litigating whether it is necessary in affidavits (…) There are no judicious uses of this legalism.” Following Garner’s advice, I omit it in my translations. Best regards, Manuel Ref: given above
I have read also that it means “sworn statement”; Garner says that “In fact, though, it is a flourish deriving from the Year Books –an equivalent of the paragraph mark: “”.
see http://www.idsos.state.id.us/notary/handbook.pdf: s.s. is the latin word "Scilicet" meaning "in particular" or "namely".
It´s an old use of red tape docs. Common practice (in Argentina) omits it directly. Hope it helps.
It means "namely", but it is omitted.


A Hayes
Australia
Local time: 15:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 100
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
it stands for


Explanation:
scilicet, Lat. To-wit; that is to say. A word used in pleadings and other instruments, as introductory to a more particular statement of matters previously mentioned in general terms. (Black's Law Dictionary)

Into German we just leave it as ss. since it is Latin - not sure, if it is customary to do that into Spanish.

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Note added at 2002-04-01 04:20:41 (GMT)
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I have heard all these other stories too -- about not knowing etc. I would think, this is all the more reason to just leave it as \"ss\". By the way, I have seen it in upper and lower case.

wrtransco
Local time: 01:12
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Ramón Solá: In german it stands for something horrible!
27 mins
  -> context is everything, isn't it!
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58 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
...clarification...


Explanation:
Just a comment. In Spanish "to wit" means "a saber", "es decir"...

Ramón Solá
Local time: 00:12
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 3952

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Manuel Cedeño Berrueta: Yes, and “a saber/es decir” doesn’t make much sense at the beginning of a notarial certificate –where it always appears.
6 hrs
  -> Of course it doesn't...
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
no creo que sea "to wit" (a saber)


Explanation:
Si bien ss significa a saber, por el lugar en que está colocado no tendría ningún sentido...

The parties to this Agreement undertake to.... including, without limitation, the following obligations, knowingly/ss:

y ahí sigue una enumeración.

Me parece que no es el caso.
Ojalá aparezca algún traductor de Estados Unidos para darte una pauta, para mí es más probable que sean abreviaturas tal vez como vos misma decís.
Sorry por no aportar mucho... en fin "que no te estoy diciendo ESTO ES P, sino ... ESTO ES -P" lógica simbólica yuk....

Saludos,

Aurora Humarán
Argentina
Local time: 02:12
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 524
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