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Uso de "if"

Spanish translation: Explanation below

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Uso de "if"
Spanish translation:Explanation below
Entered by: Ana Brassara
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20:21 Mar 21, 2007
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics / Conditionals
English term or phrase: Uso de "if"
Agradecería que alguien me explicara la diferencia de uso de las siguientes situaciones hipotéticas con "if" y la forma en que estas diferencias afectarían la traducción:

If you ***were to have*** a legal dispute, what would happen?

If you ***were to have*** walked into a health food store twenty years ago, about the only thing you would have probably found were protein powders, a few herbs, and some vitamins.

En contraste con:

If you ***had*** a legal dispute, what would happen?

If you ***had*** walked into a health food store twenty years ago, about the only thing you would have probably found were protein powders, a few herbs, and some vitamins.
Wilsonn Perez Reyes
El Salvador
Local time: 04:24
Explanation below
Explanation:
"Were to"

"Were to" in the Present

FORM
[ If... were to + VERB ...,...]

USE
"Were to" can be used in the present to emphasize that the Conditional form is extremely unlikely or unthinkably horrible. Notice that this special form is only used in the "If" Clause.

EXAMPLES:

If she were to be rich, she would be horribly obnoxious.
(It is very unlikely that she would be rich.)

If I were to have no friends, who would I spend my time with.
(Having no friends is a horrible thought.)

If Nathan were to be my boss, this job would be intolerable.
(Nathan's being my boss is a horrible concept.)


"Were to" in the Future

FORM
[ If... were to + VERB...,...]

USE
"Were to" can be used in the future to emphasize that the Conditional form is extremely unlikely or unthinkably horrible. Notice that this special form is only used in the "If" Clause

EXAMPLES:

If I were to lose my job, I would probably not find a new one quickly.
(Loosing my job would be terrible.)

If he were to fail his driving test, he would have to take it again.
(He is not likely to fail his driving test.)

If Sarah were to show up late to the birthday party, it would ruin the surprise.
(Sarah will surely come on time.)


"Were to" in the Past

FORM
[ If... were to have + PAST PARTICIPLE...,...]

USE
"Were to" can be used in the past to emphasize that the Conditional form is extremely unlikely or unthinkably horrible. Notice that this special form is only used in the "If" Clause.

EXAMPLES:

If the fire were to have destroyed the building, it would have been a tragic cultural loss.
(The thought of such a loss is too horrible to consider.)

If the dam were to have burst, the entire town would have been destroyed.
(Such destruction is too horrible to consider.)

If Sarah were to have failed the final test, she would have lost her scholarship.
(She is an excellent student, and it is very unlikely that she would have failed the test.)

http://www.englishpage.com/conditional/wereto.html

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 28 mins (2007-03-21 20:50:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If clause type II

Use

Conditional Sentences Type II refer to situations in the present. An action could happen if the present situation were different. I don't really expect the situation to change, however. I just imagine „what would happen if …“

Example: If I found her address, I would send her an invitation.

I would like to send an invitation to a friend. I have looked everywhere for her address, but I cannot find it. So now I think it is rather unlikely that I will eventually find her address.

Example: If John had the money, he would buy a Ferrari.

I know John very well and I know that he doesn't have much money, but he loves Ferraris. He would like to own a Ferrari (in his dreams). But I think it is very unlikely that he will have the money to buy one in the near future.

Conditional Sentence Type 2

→ It is possible but very unlikely, that the condition will be fulfilled.

Form: if + Simple Past, Conditional I (= would + Infinitive)

Example: If I found her address, I would send her an invitation.

http://www.ego4u.com/en/cram-up/grammar/conditional-sentence...

Selected response from:

Ana Brassara
Local time: 07:24
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3Explanation below
Ana Brassara
5N/Aglaster
5Implica una diferencia en la conjugación, solamente (y en este caso).
Olivia Bravo


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
uso de \"if\"
Implica una diferencia en la conjugación, solamente (y en este caso).


Explanation:
1.-"***Si te vieras*** en la necesidad de entrar en un litigio..."
2.-"***De haber entrado*** a un negocio de comida saludable, lo único que tal vez habrías encontrado..."
3.-"¿Qué pasaría si ***tuvieras que entrar*** en un litigio?"
4.-"***Si hubieras*** entrado a un negocio de comida saludable, ..."

Es cuestión simplemente de la conjugación que se da en cada caso. Pero las dos primeras de arriba significan básicamente lo mismo que las dos de abajo.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 minutos (2007-03-21 20:30:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Pero como todo, siempre debes supeditarte al 'contexto'.

Olivia Bravo
Local time: 05:24
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  CarmenHaydee: No es correcto. Hay una gran diferencia entre una clausula con si del subjuntivo y una simple condicion con si...:)
4 hrs
  -> Como puedes ver en la misma respuesta, aclaré "en este caso". ¿Podrías tú entonces poner cuál es la diferencia entre el significado de "if you were to have a legal dispute" e "if you had a legal dispute" (en el CASO que nos ha puesto quien pregunta?

neutral  Ana Brassara: La referencia que pusiste arriba en la nota es la misma que ya había puesto yo en mi respuesta.
16 hrs
  -> Sí, y mi intención no es robarte la respuesta. De hecho "aclaré" que lo tomé de tu respuesta para ejemplificar la respuesta que le di a Carmen en cuanto a que no hay diferencia en el sentido (la cual es mi respuesta original).
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
uso de "if"
N/A


Explanation:
You don't have a difference in If, the difference is in the verb form. In both cases you will translate if as Si.

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Note added at 14 mins (2007-03-21 20:36:34 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Si fueras a tener
Si tuvieras



glaster
United States
Local time: 06:24
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Yes, my question deals basically with the use of "were to have/had" in conditionals.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Alessandro Zocchi: Glaster, that's obvious, I think the asker only wanted to express his doubts concerning conditional clauses... Ale
4 mins
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
uso de "if"
Explanation below


Explanation:
"Were to"

"Were to" in the Present

FORM
[ If... were to + VERB ...,...]

USE
"Were to" can be used in the present to emphasize that the Conditional form is extremely unlikely or unthinkably horrible. Notice that this special form is only used in the "If" Clause.

EXAMPLES:

If she were to be rich, she would be horribly obnoxious.
(It is very unlikely that she would be rich.)

If I were to have no friends, who would I spend my time with.
(Having no friends is a horrible thought.)

If Nathan were to be my boss, this job would be intolerable.
(Nathan's being my boss is a horrible concept.)


"Were to" in the Future

FORM
[ If... were to + VERB...,...]

USE
"Were to" can be used in the future to emphasize that the Conditional form is extremely unlikely or unthinkably horrible. Notice that this special form is only used in the "If" Clause

EXAMPLES:

If I were to lose my job, I would probably not find a new one quickly.
(Loosing my job would be terrible.)

If he were to fail his driving test, he would have to take it again.
(He is not likely to fail his driving test.)

If Sarah were to show up late to the birthday party, it would ruin the surprise.
(Sarah will surely come on time.)


"Were to" in the Past

FORM
[ If... were to have + PAST PARTICIPLE...,...]

USE
"Were to" can be used in the past to emphasize that the Conditional form is extremely unlikely or unthinkably horrible. Notice that this special form is only used in the "If" Clause.

EXAMPLES:

If the fire were to have destroyed the building, it would have been a tragic cultural loss.
(The thought of such a loss is too horrible to consider.)

If the dam were to have burst, the entire town would have been destroyed.
(Such destruction is too horrible to consider.)

If Sarah were to have failed the final test, she would have lost her scholarship.
(She is an excellent student, and it is very unlikely that she would have failed the test.)

http://www.englishpage.com/conditional/wereto.html

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 28 mins (2007-03-21 20:50:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If clause type II

Use

Conditional Sentences Type II refer to situations in the present. An action could happen if the present situation were different. I don't really expect the situation to change, however. I just imagine „what would happen if …“

Example: If I found her address, I would send her an invitation.

I would like to send an invitation to a friend. I have looked everywhere for her address, but I cannot find it. So now I think it is rather unlikely that I will eventually find her address.

Example: If John had the money, he would buy a Ferrari.

I know John very well and I know that he doesn't have much money, but he loves Ferraris. He would like to own a Ferrari (in his dreams). But I think it is very unlikely that he will have the money to buy one in the near future.

Conditional Sentence Type 2

→ It is possible but very unlikely, that the condition will be fulfilled.

Form: if + Simple Past, Conditional I (= would + Infinitive)

Example: If I found her address, I would send her an invitation.

http://www.ego4u.com/en/cram-up/grammar/conditional-sentence...



Ana Brassara
Local time: 07:24
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 36
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Robin Levey: Excellent explanation and examples! The 'were to' form is in effect an English subjunctive, not a conditional, although many people claim that there is no subjunctive in English.
20 mins
  -> Gracias por el comentario.

agree  Mariana T. Buttermilch: Great explanation!
49 mins
  -> ¡Gracias!

agree  Kristina Kolic: Never seen such a good and thorough explanation!
1 hr
  -> ¡Muchas gracias!

neutral  CarmenHaydee: Mediamatrix, que mucha razon tienes!! Saludos a todas!
4 hrs
  -> Gracias, pero si escribís acá mediamatrix no va a leer tu comentario, a menos que se meta de nuevo en esta pregunta.
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