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Moaning Minnie

Spanish translation: "organillo llorón"(lanzacohetes)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Moaning Minnie
Spanish translation:"organillo llorón"(lanzacohetes)
Entered by: Loren
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10:25 Feb 15, 2006
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
Military / Defense
English term or phrase: Moaning Minnie
This is related to a text dealing with WWII, I think its a sort of weapon ...can anyone help?
Aquamarine76
Ireland
Local time: 00:33
"organillo llorón"(lanzacohetes)
Explanation:
Solo aventuro una opción, si se refiere al arma en concreto. Pero ya ves que la expresión puede referirse a varias cosas, según el contexto(WWI, WWII, o postguerra). Yo dejaría el original con una traducción como la aventurada al lado. Suerte :)

Aquí va la explicación.

Moaning Minnie - person who complains a lot
This is not First World War slang, despite what some have said. 'Minnie' was: it was the name given to the devastating German trench-mortar (Minenwerfer). It was never called 'moaning', however, for it did not make a moaning sound in flight; small ones arrived silently and larger ones made a woofing sound as they turned in the air.
...The full expression made its first appearance in Second World War slang. Air-raid sirens were given several nicknames: the warning siren was variously called Wailing Winnie, Mona (existing London slang for a complaining female, a pun on 'moaner' and Moaning Minnie, a mixture of the previous two. There is evidence that after the blitz the phrase moaning Minnie was adopted by the army to designate the multi-barrelled German field-mortar and its shell, thus uniting trench slang of WWI and civilian slang of WWII.
...After the war, the expression continued in use, though 'moaning' now means 'grumbling', as it has done informally for a long time, and Minnie can be a person of either sex.
Selected response from:

Loren
Local time: 01:33
Grading comment
THANKS!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2"organillo llorón"(lanzacohetes)
Loren
5mortero "Moaning Minnie"
MLG


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
moaning minnie
"organillo llorón"(lanzacohetes)


Explanation:
Solo aventuro una opción, si se refiere al arma en concreto. Pero ya ves que la expresión puede referirse a varias cosas, según el contexto(WWI, WWII, o postguerra). Yo dejaría el original con una traducción como la aventurada al lado. Suerte :)

Aquí va la explicación.

Moaning Minnie - person who complains a lot
This is not First World War slang, despite what some have said. 'Minnie' was: it was the name given to the devastating German trench-mortar (Minenwerfer). It was never called 'moaning', however, for it did not make a moaning sound in flight; small ones arrived silently and larger ones made a woofing sound as they turned in the air.
...The full expression made its first appearance in Second World War slang. Air-raid sirens were given several nicknames: the warning siren was variously called Wailing Winnie, Mona (existing London slang for a complaining female, a pun on 'moaner' and Moaning Minnie, a mixture of the previous two. There is evidence that after the blitz the phrase moaning Minnie was adopted by the army to designate the multi-barrelled German field-mortar and its shell, thus uniting trench slang of WWI and civilian slang of WWII.
...After the war, the expression continued in use, though 'moaning' now means 'grumbling', as it has done informally for a long time, and Minnie can be a person of either sex.

Loren
Local time: 01:33
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
THANKS!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Egmont
2 hrs
  -> ¡Muchas gracias!

agree  Francisco Pavez: lo dejaría sin traducción como lo sugieres
4 days
  -> ¡Muchas gracias, Francisco!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
mortero "Moaning Minnie"


Explanation:
"Meaning is=A habitual Grumbler. Origin= The term was first used iin a nother context - to describe the German World War One mortars, which made a moaning noise in flight."

I would leave the name as is.

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Note added at 6 hrs (2006-02-15 16:34:46 GMT)
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By The Fernhurst Centre

People in story: Leslie William Colcutt
Location of story: The Wirral Peninsula
Background to story: Civilian

This is Les Colcutt’s story: it has been added by Pauline Colcutt, with permission from the author who understands the terms and conditions of adding his story to the website.

‘There she goes again, ‘Moaning Minnie’, we used to say as we heard the air raid siren start its wailing sound. Dad would then put up the blackout curtains so that we could at least have a light until the ‘Jerry Planes’ came over. Then we would hear the occasional shout of ‘Put that light out’ as the Air Raid Warden made his rounds. When we eventually heard the...
http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/ww2/A2639522
#
Glossary - Vimy Open this result in new window
... Mauser. Howitzer. Mortar. Minnie or Moaning Minnie. Stokes Gun ... Minnie or Moaning Minnie. Minnie or moaning minnie was the allie's nickname for the Minenwerfer, a German mortar that ...
www.kingandempire.com/g3_V.html - 62k - Cached - More from this site - Save - Block

I would still leave the :Moaning Minnie untranslated but as Lorenzo suggest perhaps a breif descrp. or defin.)

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Note added at 6 hrs (2006-02-15 16:36:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"brief" sorry abt the typo there.


    Reference: http://www.phrases.org.ukm
MLG
United States
Local time: 16:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
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Changes made by editors
Feb 15, 2006 - Changes made by Anabel Martínez:
Language pairSpanish to English » English to Spanish


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