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Boogie Man

Spanish translation: "I'm Your Boogie Man"

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13:31 May 14, 2005
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
Other
English term or phrase: Boogie Man
***Boogie Man***
Whether your Dad is a “Son of a Preacher Man,” or a “Macho Man,” xxx has just the right ringtone for him
Lida Garcia
Peru
Local time: 01:57
Spanish translation:"I'm Your Boogie Man"
Explanation:
It refers to the name of a song by KC and the Sunshine Band:

KC and the Sunshine Band's hit streak started in 1975 with "Get Down Tonight" and "That's The Way (I Like It)" and extended into 1977 with "(Shake, Shake, Shake) Shake Your Booty." "I'm Your Boogie Man" was the group's fourth number one song, making them only the second group to have four number one singles in the Seventies after the Jackson Five.
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/1031596?bs=1#marker_submit

I don't know if you'd translate it if it refers to a song title...but if you have to, maybe something like "El marchoso"?

Lyrics are here:
http://www.oracleband.net/Lyrics/im_your_boogie_man.htm
Selected response from:

xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 08:57
Grading comment
gracias!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +6"I'm Your Boogie Man"xxxtazdog
4 +4aficionado de jazzRefugio
5el rumbero
Giovanni Rengifo
5 -1El Cucuy
Henry Hinds
4 -1coco, cuco, terror
Michael Powers (PhD)


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
boogie man
coco, cuco, terror


Explanation:
Diccionario Oxford

bogeyman / "b@Ugim&n / n (pl -men / -men /)
a (imaginary evil person) coco m (fam), cuco m (CS, Per fam)
b (of a team, party) terror m, cuco m (CS fam)


Mike :)

Michael Powers (PhD)
United States
Local time: 02:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 208

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Walter Landesman
2 mins
  -> Gracias, landesman - Mike :)

neutral  RebeW: Mike, I think this refers to "boogie" as in dancing! It's an ad for a ring tune... thus the reference to the songs.... :}
19 mins

disagree  Refugio: This would be a man who likes to boogie, not a bogeyman.
4 hrs

disagree  Giovanni Rengifo: "el coco" doesn´t work here Michael.
10 hrs
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
boogie man
El Cucuy


Explanation:
Mexicano (en general), aunque mi hija empezó diciendo "cucú", pues se trata de una de esas palabras que inventan los niños a tierna edad sin que nadie se las enseñe.

Sería interesante estudiar el fenómeno.

Henry Hinds
United States
Local time: 00:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 661

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Refugio: boogie, not bogey
4 hrs
  -> Maybe I'll stay away from popular culture from now on, it's not my strongest area!
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
boogie man
"I'm Your Boogie Man"


Explanation:
It refers to the name of a song by KC and the Sunshine Band:

KC and the Sunshine Band's hit streak started in 1975 with "Get Down Tonight" and "That's The Way (I Like It)" and extended into 1977 with "(Shake, Shake, Shake) Shake Your Booty." "I'm Your Boogie Man" was the group's fourth number one song, making them only the second group to have four number one singles in the Seventies after the Jackson Five.
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/1031596?bs=1#marker_submit

I don't know if you'd translate it if it refers to a song title...but if you have to, maybe something like "El marchoso"?

Lyrics are here:
http://www.oracleband.net/Lyrics/im_your_boogie_man.htm


xxxtazdog
Spain
Local time: 08:57
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
gracias!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nora Escoms: That's right. I would leave it in English.
2 mins

agree  Carmen Schultz
19 mins

agree  Claudia Luque Bedregal
2 hrs

agree  aivars: Boogie Man, alone it's also OK, "Macho Man" es de Village People, "Son of a Preacher" lo cantaba Dusty Springfield, no creo que ninguno de estos temas haya recibido una traducción al español. [esto plantea un problema de traducción]
3 hrs

agree  Gabriela Rodriguez
4 hrs

agree  Charlie George
5 hrs

neutral  Refugio: The expression "boogie man" existed long before this song; I remember hearing it in the fifties. // I think it refers to the music style, not a particular song. Those songs are not exactly popular with today's generation.
23 hrs
  -> as a song title? I took it to be a song title, like the others, since the text is referring to ringtones.
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
boogie man
aficionado de jazz


Explanation:
If it must be translated at all, since boogie music is also called boogie in Spanish.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs 40 mins (2005-05-14 18:12:34 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"I\'m Your Boogie Man\" = música boogie / jazz
\"Son of a Preacher Man\" = música country
\"Macho Man\" = música rock

Refugio
Local time: 23:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 91

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxtazdog: both "I'm Your Boogie Man" and "Macho Man" are disco/dance-type songs. http://www.doubleimagedjs.citymax.com/CLASSICDISCO.html
12 mins
  -> The point is that the songs are referring to different paternal musical tastes, not what type of music each is.

agree  Gerardo Garcia Ramis: Sí, se trata de los gustos, si yo lo estuviera traduciendo me olvidaría de las referencias musicales, que quizás no registren con la audiencia objetiva del comercial, y pondría algo así como “No importa si papá prefiere el ‘corito’ o el ‘meneito', X..."
2 hrs
  -> Exactamente. Gracias, Gerardo

agree  Ricardo Eid
3 hrs
  -> Gracias, Ricardo

agree  Jorge Melo
7 hrs
  -> Gracias, Jorge

agree  Manuel Lagos
11 hrs
  -> Gracias, Manuel
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
boogie man
el rumbero


Explanation:
Utilizar el nombre en inglés "boogie man" sería una opción considerando que se trata de una audiencia joven (los hijos que le consiguen un "ring tone" a sus papás). Sin embargo, si necesitas un nombre en español, podrías utilizar "el rumbero" o algo que signifique "party animal" en tu país.

Giovanni Rengifo
Colombia
Local time: 01:57
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 107
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