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RAPTORIAL / RAPTUROUS

Spanish translation: The root is there

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01:40 Apr 26, 2001
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
English term or phrase: RAPTORIAL / RAPTUROUS
I'm trying to create in Spanish a spoonerism that combines the two. It can be done in English with the word "raptorous", but is it possible in Spanish?
xxxEen
Local time: 06:00
Spanish translation:The root is there
Explanation:
I'm a little confused now, after what Jon Zuber said about the portmanteau word. What are you really looking for? An spoonerism or a protmanteau word?
If it is a spoonerism, you can do it, and the root, contrary to what Jon says, is indeed there.
"Robo" (robery) in Spanish could also be "rapiña", there you have your root.
Now, I could, easily, create a spoonerism in Spanish with "rapiña" and rapturous because I'd simply use "robo" and "arrobado", which is one of the Spanish terms for raptourous.

I could say for example: "...el hombre estaba totalmente arrobado", referring to somone who was robbed; and I am really saying that he was rapturous or entranced, that's a spoonerism. You have to take into account that a spoonerism is an interchange of sounds. For example: "a well-boiled icicle" instead of a "well-oiled bycicle"; or "let me sew you to your sheet" for "let me show you to your seat".
Now, if the above spoonerism does not work for you, you will have to provide some context, so we can help you better.

On the other hand, a portmanteau word (as Jon says) is a combination of two words, both in form and meaning. This will be easier than a spoonerism with the terms provided.

Let us see the best translations to do it:

For raptorial let's use "rapaz" (inlcinado al robo, según el dic. Larousse). And for rapturous, we'll use "arrobado" (ecstatic, rapturous, according to the Simon and Schuster's Int' Dict.).

So we have "rapaz" and "arrobado", and you want to create a portmanteau word. You know what? I don't know your context, but I wouldn't do it if I were you. You could say "arrapazado" or "arropazado", but who would understand that? What I would do, if I were you, is using both terms "un arrobado rapaz".
For example: "...y el arrobado rapaz entró en el banco, puso a todas las personas en el suelo, incluyendo a los guardias, y perpetró un robo fabuloso" (...and the rapturous robber broke into the bank...).
Or "un arrobado momento rapaz" ("a rapturous raptorial moment").

I don't know...I hope this helps, if you provide some context, perhaps I can help you better.

good luck!
Selected response from:

Ricardo Galarza
Uruguay
Local time: 03:00
Grading comment
Wow -- many thanks for an epic of an answer! I'm in complete agreement with you regards giving up on it, as also is the author herself. I explained to her the impossibility of such a word in Spanish and she said that as the "raptorial" side was the most important element of the word she had created ("raptorous" -- how one simple letter-substitution creates so many problems!) then I should just go with that and use "rapaz".
Thanks again,
Ian

4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na"Arrobar" does not come from "rapere",xxxJon Zuber
naThe root is there
Ricardo Galarza
naYes, but not with the same root.xxxJon Zuber


  

Answers


4 hrs
Yes, but not with the same root.


Explanation:
The words you would need from "rapere" aren't there. You'll have to find another way to do it. And you're looking for a portmanteau word, not a spoonerism.

xxxJon Zuber
PRO pts in pair: 83

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Patricia Lutteral

xxxOso
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

10 hrs
The root is there


Explanation:
I'm a little confused now, after what Jon Zuber said about the portmanteau word. What are you really looking for? An spoonerism or a protmanteau word?
If it is a spoonerism, you can do it, and the root, contrary to what Jon says, is indeed there.
"Robo" (robery) in Spanish could also be "rapiña", there you have your root.
Now, I could, easily, create a spoonerism in Spanish with "rapiña" and rapturous because I'd simply use "robo" and "arrobado", which is one of the Spanish terms for raptourous.

I could say for example: "...el hombre estaba totalmente arrobado", referring to somone who was robbed; and I am really saying that he was rapturous or entranced, that's a spoonerism. You have to take into account that a spoonerism is an interchange of sounds. For example: "a well-boiled icicle" instead of a "well-oiled bycicle"; or "let me sew you to your sheet" for "let me show you to your seat".
Now, if the above spoonerism does not work for you, you will have to provide some context, so we can help you better.

On the other hand, a portmanteau word (as Jon says) is a combination of two words, both in form and meaning. This will be easier than a spoonerism with the terms provided.

Let us see the best translations to do it:

For raptorial let's use "rapaz" (inlcinado al robo, según el dic. Larousse). And for rapturous, we'll use "arrobado" (ecstatic, rapturous, according to the Simon and Schuster's Int' Dict.).

So we have "rapaz" and "arrobado", and you want to create a portmanteau word. You know what? I don't know your context, but I wouldn't do it if I were you. You could say "arrapazado" or "arropazado", but who would understand that? What I would do, if I were you, is using both terms "un arrobado rapaz".
For example: "...y el arrobado rapaz entró en el banco, puso a todas las personas en el suelo, incluyendo a los guardias, y perpetró un robo fabuloso" (...and the rapturous robber broke into the bank...).
Or "un arrobado momento rapaz" ("a rapturous raptorial moment").

I don't know...I hope this helps, if you provide some context, perhaps I can help you better.

good luck!



    Diccionario P. Larousse ilus., Simon&Schuster's Int'l Dictionary
    Webester's New World Dict., New Shorter Oxford
Ricardo Galarza
Uruguay
Local time: 03:00
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 654
Grading comment
Wow -- many thanks for an epic of an answer! I'm in complete agreement with you regards giving up on it, as also is the author herself. I explained to her the impossibility of such a word in Spanish and she said that as the "raptorial" side was the most important element of the word she had created ("raptorous" -- how one simple letter-substitution creates so many problems!) then I should just go with that and use "rapaz".
Thanks again,
Ian
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day3 hrs
"Arrobar" does not come from "rapere",


Explanation:
it comes, via "robar", from the Old High German "roubón", according to the DRAE. When someone comes up with a modern Spanish word, or a well-enough known archaicism for "rapturous" that derives from "rapere" and can be melded with something about birds of prey, then I'll think I deserve that pair of zeros. And I didn't say the root wasn't there; obviously "raptor" and "rapiña" are from "rapere". I said a derived word for "rapturous" wasn't there.

xxxJon Zuber
PRO pts in pair: 83
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