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white girl

Spanish translation: güera

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:white girl
Spanish translation:güera
Entered by: Henry Hinds
Options:
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03:43 Oct 8, 2002
English to Spanish translations [Non-PRO]
Slang / Slang
English term or phrase: white girl
white girl in spanish slang. actually the spelling is what Im curious about. we think it's Guera or Wera but its pronounced Weda
Tamara
güera
Explanation:
A "blondie" on the border.

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Note added at 2002-10-08 03:47:26 (GMT)
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And applied to anyone who is light complextioned and has light colored hair, eyes, etc., including Latinos who meet that description.

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Note added at 2002-10-08 03:55:51 (GMT)
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\"Weda\" is probably the closest way the pronunciation can be rendered in English.

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Note added at 2002-10-08 03:57:36 (GMT)
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Male is \"güero\". I often am called that, it\'s not insulting but rather positive.

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Note added at 2002-10-08 13:41:29 (GMT)
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Latinos at all latitudes are prone to using terms based on people\'s physical appearance, \"dark\", \"light\", \"fatty\", \"slim\", \"shorty\", etc. which could be considered insulting among English speakers (due to cultural sensitivity to racial slurs, etc.) , but in Latino culture they are usually terms of endearment, just so you know if and when you encounter them. It means they like you.

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Note added at 2002-10-08 17:02:18 (GMT)
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Nicknames among Latinos also go on and on, often based on physical characteristics, racial appearance (\"Chino\", \"Indio\") and even what we could consider defects (too big a rear end, big ears, missing teeth, arm, etc.) resemblance to well-known celebrities or cartoon characters, sometimes flattering, sometimes not, but it all has to be looked at from the proper perspective. It\'s just part of their culture.
Selected response from:

Henry Hinds
Local time: 22:23
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +9güera
Henry Hinds


  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +9
güera


Explanation:
A "blondie" on the border.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-08 03:47:26 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

And applied to anyone who is light complextioned and has light colored hair, eyes, etc., including Latinos who meet that description.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-08 03:55:51 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Weda\" is probably the closest way the pronunciation can be rendered in English.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-08 03:57:36 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Male is \"güero\". I often am called that, it\'s not insulting but rather positive.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-08 13:41:29 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Latinos at all latitudes are prone to using terms based on people\'s physical appearance, \"dark\", \"light\", \"fatty\", \"slim\", \"shorty\", etc. which could be considered insulting among English speakers (due to cultural sensitivity to racial slurs, etc.) , but in Latino culture they are usually terms of endearment, just so you know if and when you encounter them. It means they like you.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-10-08 17:02:18 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Nicknames among Latinos also go on and on, often based on physical characteristics, racial appearance (\"Chino\", \"Indio\") and even what we could consider defects (too big a rear end, big ears, missing teeth, arm, etc.) resemblance to well-known celebrities or cartoon characters, sometimes flattering, sometimes not, but it all has to be looked at from the proper perspective. It\'s just part of their culture.


    Exp.
Henry Hinds
Local time: 22:23
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxOso: Whaddap wedo? ¶:^)))
34 mins
  -> ¡Epa!, ¿Oso blanco o morenito???

agree  Karina Pelech
39 mins
  -> Thanls, ACB.

agree  Clara Lazimy
52 mins
  -> Gracias, Clara.

agree  Refugio: Me alegro que, por tu respuesta a Oso y por tu insistencia en que no es insulto, pareces darte cuenta de las posibles implicaciones de esta pregunta.
1 hr
  -> Sí, pues es algo cultural que por cierto no tiene las mismas implicaciones para el latino y el angloparlante.

agree  CNF
8 hrs
  -> Gracias, Naty.

agree  LoreAC
10 hrs
  -> Gracias, Lore.

agree  Marsha Wilkie: Wonderful socio-cultural explanation.
10 hrs
  -> How many times do you hear terms like "mi Negro" y "mi Gordita", etc., as pet names? But to people from the US they can be misunderstood. Thanks.

agree  elenali: Güerita para jovencitas... a mi hjia en la calle le dicen: "gúerita", mientras que a mi, por ser señora, solo "guera"
16 hrs
  -> Pos sí, ya ves que hay excepciones; "güerita" suena bien pero "güerota" de lo contrario, no suena nada bien.

agree  Monica Colangelo: Pos sí, me lo han enseñado taaaaaantos años de novelas venezolanas, mexicanas... para algo tenían que servir
18 hrs
  -> Y las canciones... esa cubana que dice "Aguanta la Güera" ¿o acaso no será "Juan Talavera"?
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