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skeevy

Spanish translation: desagradable/repugnante

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:skeevy
Spanish translation:desagradable/repugnante
Entered by: Daniel Coria
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16:54 Jul 20, 2005
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
Social Science, Sociology, Ethics, etc.
English term or phrase: skeevy
Qué puedo entender como skeevy en español? Gracias
luis_oma
desagradable/repugnante
Explanation:
Dependiendo del registro...

That weird, skeevy guy who's always picking through people's garbage is a Rockefeller scion.

Skeevy is a word that eludes both AH and M-W but has recently made it into the OED. There we learn that the meaning of this U.S. slang term is as its context implies in the above sentence: "Disgusting, distasteful, or dirty; discomforting; sleazy." The first example comes from 1976, where in Philadelphia Magazine article we learn that "The word ‘skeevie’ used by South Philadelphians to indicate something disgusting is from Italian ‘schifare’, to loathe." That sentence, though, seems to give rise to one of the characteristic features of recent OED entries, a strikingly elaborate etymology. Thus behold the medieval roots of skeevy:

< Italian regional (Tuscany) schifo, adjective (< Italian schifo (noun) sense of repugnance, nausea, disgust (1353 in Boccaccio) < Old French eschif hostile, fierce: see ESCHEW a.)

But 1353 isn't early enough for you, discontented reader? The etymology also cites skeeve, which can be a verb -- to disgust someone; to loathe someone -- or a noun -- "an obnoxious or contemptible person." The earliest cited use for the former comes in 1986; for the latter, 1990. Yet the OED's etymology for the first suggests that

Prob. back-formation < SKEEVY a., perh. after Italian schifare to loathe (a1292), (reflexive) to feel disgust or nausea (a1342), to nauseate, repel (1959). Cf. slightly later SKEEVE n.

Slightly later indeed. We're not sure if we're glad we've reached a point with the OED where four years constitutes "slightly later."

Usage examples for skeevy are as yet fairly slim: despite the 1976 citation, the word seems to have been forgotten during the 1980s. But it made its triumphant return in the 1990s, with such uses as "Zevon has built a career on well-crafted pop songs that tend to be either smartass and sensitive or smartass and skeevy" from Newsday in 1991.

http://www.thediscouragingword.com/archives/arc11.shtml

Hope it helps!
Selected response from:

Daniel Coria
Argentina
Local time: 04:43
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3desagradable/repugnante
Daniel Coria
5disgustoso, desagradable
Noelia Fernández Vega


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
desagradable/repugnante


Explanation:
Dependiendo del registro...

That weird, skeevy guy who's always picking through people's garbage is a Rockefeller scion.

Skeevy is a word that eludes both AH and M-W but has recently made it into the OED. There we learn that the meaning of this U.S. slang term is as its context implies in the above sentence: "Disgusting, distasteful, or dirty; discomforting; sleazy." The first example comes from 1976, where in Philadelphia Magazine article we learn that "The word ‘skeevie’ used by South Philadelphians to indicate something disgusting is from Italian ‘schifare’, to loathe." That sentence, though, seems to give rise to one of the characteristic features of recent OED entries, a strikingly elaborate etymology. Thus behold the medieval roots of skeevy:

< Italian regional (Tuscany) schifo, adjective (< Italian schifo (noun) sense of repugnance, nausea, disgust (1353 in Boccaccio) < Old French eschif hostile, fierce: see ESCHEW a.)

But 1353 isn't early enough for you, discontented reader? The etymology also cites skeeve, which can be a verb -- to disgust someone; to loathe someone -- or a noun -- "an obnoxious or contemptible person." The earliest cited use for the former comes in 1986; for the latter, 1990. Yet the OED's etymology for the first suggests that

Prob. back-formation < SKEEVY a., perh. after Italian schifare to loathe (a1292), (reflexive) to feel disgust or nausea (a1342), to nauseate, repel (1959). Cf. slightly later SKEEVE n.

Slightly later indeed. We're not sure if we're glad we've reached a point with the OED where four years constitutes "slightly later."

Usage examples for skeevy are as yet fairly slim: despite the 1976 citation, the word seems to have been forgotten during the 1980s. But it made its triumphant return in the 1990s, with such uses as "Zevon has built a career on well-crafted pop songs that tend to be either smartass and sensitive or smartass and skeevy" from Newsday in 1991.

http://www.thediscouragingword.com/archives/arc11.shtml

Hope it helps!

Daniel Coria
Argentina
Local time: 04:43
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Manuel Rodriguez
1 min
  -> Gracias, Manuel...

agree  Xenia Wong
5 mins
  -> Gracias, Xenia...

agree  Malena Garcia
6 hrs
  -> Gracias, Malega...
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
disgustoso, desagradable


Explanation:
salon :: :: col :: keil :: Late starter, By Garrison Keillor :: Page 1 - Traducir esta página
... They referred to guys who pinched their butts as "skeevy." ... The College Slang Research Project records skeevy as meaning "shady, unsavory, icky." ( ...dir.salon.com/books/col/keil/2001/07/24/late_starter/index.html

Noelia Fernández Vega
Italy
Local time: 09:43
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 2
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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