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abreviaturas de medidas

Spanish translation: pie = none, pulgada = pulg.

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06:16 Jun 12, 2000
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
English term or phrase: abreviaturas de medidas
Does anybody know the acceptable way of abbreviating feet and inches in Spanish? The RAE has just confirmed to me that one can use ' and ", but many technical editors insist that one uses a spanish abbreviation, such as pulg or pda. Feet, of course, they want us to use pie or pies.
This can be very cumbersome, particularly in large graphs and tables. In order to save space, sometimes I have had to use a footnote, but it is not always possible. Another "little problem" arises when converting english to metric, for example stuff like lbs.x sq.ft, etc.
Jaime Backal
Local time: 08:26
Spanish translation:pie = none, pulgada = pulg.
Explanation:
There's no way that 'pie', which is a monosyllable, can be abbreviated. Although I'm always hesitant about actually abbreviating 'pulgada' as well, it has always been 'pulg.' And, yes, you are on the safe side if you use the quotation and double quotation for 'pie' and 'pulgada', respectively.
Selected response from:

Lisa Siegel-Cruz
United States
Local time: 08:26
Grading comment
Gracias a todos los que me ofrecieron ayuda.
¡Saludos!
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
naver abajo
Silvia Sassone
napie = none, pulgada = pulg.
Lisa Siegel-Cruz
naVer abajo
Carmen Hernaiz
naftAlicia Loria, C. Tr., M. Ed.
napies 2 (con el no. dos arriba) o bien ft2Alicia Loria, C. Tr., M. Ed.
naI perfectly agree with you, however, I have found most convenient
Luz Bordenkircher


  

Answers


18 mins
I perfectly agree with you, however, I have found most convenient


Explanation:
to use the universal symbols:

5' (five feet or 5 pies)

6" (six inches or 6 pulgadas)

This is understood my all and saves a lot of space.

Good Luck!


Luz Bordenkircher
Local time: 08:26
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 208
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21 mins
pies 2 (con el no. dos arriba) o bien ft2


Explanation:
No hace mucho hice esta misma pregunta al departamento de consultas del diccionario de la Real Academia Española. A continuación le transcribo su mensaje y añado el alias de la RAE en la red.

Atentos saludos,

Aloria

"Para referirse de forma abreviada a la unidad de longitud pie, usted
puede utilizar el símbolo invariable "ft" escrito siempre sin punto.
Ejemplo:

Rollo de 120 m (400 ft) de hojas térmicas.

Reciba un cordial saludo.

--
Departamento de Consultas
RAE"




    Consulta3 <consu3@rae.es>
Alicia Loria, C. Tr., M. Ed.
PRO pts in pair: 4
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25 mins
ft


Explanation:
Vuelvo a poner la dirección de la RAE que no pasó bien en mi mensaje.

Suerte!

Aloria


    Consulta3 <consu3@rae.es>
Alicia Loria, C. Tr., M. Ed.
PRO pts in pair: 4
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2 hrs
Ver abajo


Explanation:
La forma que yo suelo usar, es la abreviatura del idioma original, haciendo una acotación bajo el texto completo con un breve explicación del término.
Suerte con ello!

Carmen Hernaiz
Spain
Local time: 14:26
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 765
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5 hrs
ver abajo


Explanation:
Te envío algunas de las que uso yo:
pulg.; lbs. pulg.; lbs. pie.
Silvia (Argentina)

Silvia Sassone
Argentina
Local time: 09:26
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 531
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6 hrs
pie = none, pulgada = pulg.


Explanation:
There's no way that 'pie', which is a monosyllable, can be abbreviated. Although I'm always hesitant about actually abbreviating 'pulgada' as well, it has always been 'pulg.' And, yes, you are on the safe side if you use the quotation and double quotation for 'pie' and 'pulgada', respectively.

Lisa Siegel-Cruz
United States
Local time: 08:26
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 13
Grading comment
Gracias a todos los que me ofrecieron ayuda.
¡Saludos!
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