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Bless you

Tagalog translation: (not applicable)

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09:58 Dec 28, 2005
English to Tagalog translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
English term or phrase: Bless you
What do people usually say when anyone sneezes? I need the most "common" version, not the literal translation like "God bless you" or smth. like that.
Thank you in advance.
Gilmanovich
Local time: 22:59
Tagalog translation:(not applicable)
Explanation:
well, this is interesting...


come to think about it, Filipinos do not say "bless you" or any other expression when anyone sneezes. it's just not in our culture. some elders would mimic the sound of kids as they sneeze (achoo!) or cough (ahem!) but that's not customary, nor does it carry the intention of "bless you", but rather to sympathize with the kids, or sometimes help them avoid embarassment (ok, dear, it's all right to sneeze), or sometimes to goad them into completing their action (go on, let that cough out).

anyway if you're still interested in the translation for bless you, it's either "pagpalain ka" ("may you be blessed", a more direct expression) or "kaawaan ka ng diyos" ("may god have mercy on you", more of a religious blessing, bestowed especially upon younger people after they strike the hand of their elders against their foreheads in a Filipino gesture of respect called "pagmamano").

hope this helps
Selected response from:

Jake Estrada
Local time: 02:59
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5(not applicable)
Jake Estrada
4 -1bless you or God bless you
Leny Vargas


  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
bless you
(not applicable)


Explanation:
well, this is interesting...


come to think about it, Filipinos do not say "bless you" or any other expression when anyone sneezes. it's just not in our culture. some elders would mimic the sound of kids as they sneeze (achoo!) or cough (ahem!) but that's not customary, nor does it carry the intention of "bless you", but rather to sympathize with the kids, or sometimes help them avoid embarassment (ok, dear, it's all right to sneeze), or sometimes to goad them into completing their action (go on, let that cough out).

anyway if you're still interested in the translation for bless you, it's either "pagpalain ka" ("may you be blessed", a more direct expression) or "kaawaan ka ng diyos" ("may god have mercy on you", more of a religious blessing, bestowed especially upon younger people after they strike the hand of their elders against their foreheads in a Filipino gesture of respect called "pagmamano").

hope this helps

Jake Estrada
Local time: 02:59
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in TagalogTagalog
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Leny Vargas: Filipinos use this expression... maybe not so much in Luzon but In the Visayas they do. :)
33 days
  -> yes, but of course Tagalog is not spoken in Visayas. the answer would have been different if had been a Visayan/Cebuano forum...just the same I should have referred to "Tagalog-speaking Filipinos" than just simply "Filipinos". thanks for the feedback
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34 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
bless you
bless you or God bless you


Explanation:
There is no Tagalog translation to this. We use the same expression and that is in English too. We say 'bless you' or 'God bless you' when we someone sneezes.

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Note added at 34 days (2006-01-31 13:53:49 GMT) Post-grading
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Jake, you may be right. But I am not so sure that people in Manila don't use this expression. As we know a lot of Filipinos from Visayas and Mindanao move to Manila and they bring their 'own culture' and customs with them. That is why the national language is called Filipino (based on Tagalog but also a lingua franca -- any language widely used beyond its native speakers; referred to a mix of mostly Tagalog and vocabulary drawn from other dialects). But I just realised that the site stresses on 'Tagalog' and not Filipino translation. So, probably you are correct.

Leny Vargas
France
Local time: 20:59
Native speaker of: Native in TagalogTagalog, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Jake Estrada: I'm not so sure that this is correct localization. Here in the Philippines it's uncommon to hear commonfolk Tagalog speakers say "bless you"/"God bless you". Those who do are simply speaking in English rather than using an assimilated Tagalog expression
12 mins
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