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difference between flemish and dutch

Dutch translation: explanation

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10:03 Mar 25, 2003
Flemish to Dutch translations [Non-PRO]
/ general question about these languages
Flemish term or phrase: difference between flemish and dutch
Hi!
I need to know what the difference is between flemish and dutch languages. Is flemish like a dialect of dutch, or is it a completely different language (only that they belong to the same family)? That is, do dutch speakers understand flemish (written flemish)?
Thanks!
Sílvia Miranda Sánchez
Local time: 20:03
Dutch translation:explanation
Explanation:
Hello,
both languages are the same but with some slight differences in expressions. Flemish is a name for the Dutch as it is spoken in Belgium (referring to the Flemish part of the country). The books, articles, and everything in writing is exactly the same. Flemish is not a dialect (of course there are many dialects, as there are in all languages), but the official language is the same.
If in Belgium we speak of the official languages, we speak of Dutch and French, and not of Flemish and French.
Hope this helps.
Regards,
Chantal
Selected response from:

Chantal Henno
Local time: 20:03
Grading comment
Thanks to both of you!!! I'm sorry I can choose only one answer...
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2explanation
Chantal Henno
5The 'Flemish' language
Evert DELOOF-SYS


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
explanation


Explanation:
Hello,
both languages are the same but with some slight differences in expressions. Flemish is a name for the Dutch as it is spoken in Belgium (referring to the Flemish part of the country). The books, articles, and everything in writing is exactly the same. Flemish is not a dialect (of course there are many dialects, as there are in all languages), but the official language is the same.
If in Belgium we speak of the official languages, we speak of Dutch and French, and not of Flemish and French.
Hope this helps.
Regards,
Chantal

Chantal Henno
Local time: 20:03
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch
Grading comment
Thanks to both of you!!! I'm sorry I can choose only one answer...

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Els Peleman: i agree completely. You can compare it a little bit with american and brittish english. Most of the words are the same but there are differences, even in the way of pronunciation. That's for us as belgian people the same.
2 mins
  -> bedankt

agree  CPD: I think you can compare it with spanish and castilian. Truely I speak castilian, but I speak spanish for foreign purposes.
49 mins
  -> thanks
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
The 'Flemish' language


Explanation:
You're touching a topic that would need a lot of explanation and has caused several heated discussions over the years.

Flemish language

member of the West Germanic group of the Germanic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages (see Germanic languages). Generally regarded as the Belgian variant of Dutch (see Dutch language) rather than as a separate tongue, Flemish is spoken by approximately 5.5 million people in Belgium, where it is one of the official languages, and by a few thousand persons in France. So closely are Flemish and Dutch related that the difference between them has been compared to the difference between American and British English; however, some scholars hold that they have diverged sufficiently since the 16th cent. to be described as separate languages.

http://www.bartleby.com/65/fl/FlemishLan.html

You'll find a bit of history at:

http://www.theotherside.co.uk/tm-heritage/background/languag...

or read the following:

The Flemish language - "flamand"

A country divided
When French king Louis XIV captured much of the old Spanish/Austrian Netherlands, his peace treaties drew artificial borders across Flanders. The new border divided centuries-old districts in two, separating towns such as Lille from half of their natural hinterland.

It seemed to have taken several generations for people in the North to have accepted that they were part of France. Flanders had prospered under the Spanish and the Austrians.

As recently as 1900 the everyday language of people in maritime Flanders was Flemish - "flamand", a dialect of Dutch - rather than French. (see map of language areas)


King Louis XIV - "the Sun King" - divided Flanders in order to strengthen the north and eastern borders of France

Slow death of the old language
In 1802 when Napoleon set up the new schools - "lycées" - to give everyone the chance of a free education, pupils in this area had their lessons in French, but were permitted as a concession to converse amongst themselves in Flemish.

1830 Belgian independence
After the Napoleonic Wars, the peace settlement in 1815 initially put the old Austrian Netherlands under the rule of the Dutch kingdom. But the Catholics of this area resented domination by the Protestant Dutch. They revolted, and in 1830, the Belgium was declared an independent state.

Although thrown together in one country by their Catholic religion, the Belgians were divided by language (see map of language areas). At the outset, there was a strong movement amongst the French-speaking Walloons in western Belgium to join France. French king Louis Philippe ignored them in the interests of European peace. In later decades there were movements of families in both directions across the Franco-Belgian border.

Behind the French border, French gradually took over as the main language. Education and military service were strong influences giving young men particularly a French national identity.




The legacy
During the German Occupation of 1940-44, the whole area was administered from Brussels, under harsh military rule. The Nazis tried to use Flemish cultural identity to divide the local population, and some supporters of Flemish dialect and traditions were accused of collaboration after the war.

Today the Flemish language is virtually dead in northern France, but there is a body of local slang words called "Ch'ti", in which many Flemish words survive. Flamand has left behind a strong legacy in the form of many local placenames, like Steenwerck, Hondschoote, Cassel, Wormhout... There is a distinctive region cuisine - the north is also the only part of France where the preferred everyday drink is beer rather than wine. The north's carnival "giants" are a popular custom shared with Belgium and Spain. There is a small radio station broadcasting from Cassel that tries to revive the old language. But unlike other minority language groups, such as the Basques in Spain, or welsh-Gaelic in the UK, there is little popular response.

Anyway, if something would be written in real Flemish, using lots of idioms etc I'm not sure many Dutch would understand it.
But don't forget that 'Flemish' has many 'dialects' as well.
If a person from Antwerp would write a text containing typical expressions used in Antwerp, a person from Bruges (only 100 kms away) wouldn't understand a lot either. And vice versa.

Just go a google a bit, I say.




Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 20:03
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in FlemishFlemish
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