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Prise de parole homogène

English translation: consistent message

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:Prise de parole homogène
English translation:consistent message
Entered by: Sandra Petch
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10:58 Aug 3, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Advertising / Public Relations
French term or phrase: Prise de parole homogène
"Une prise de parole homogène : surpression en (mois)"

Referring to the promotion of a product. My understanding is that there will be constant and steady promotion of the product with more intensive promotion during a particular month. However, this seems contradictory, particularly as there is no "mais" or "cependant" indicating a contrast, just a colon.

Your opinions/interpretations much appreciated!
Sandra Petch
Local time: 22:52
consistent message
Explanation:
in other words, they must all be singing from the same hymn sheet

BUT with an extra effort at a certain moment in time
Selected response from:

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 22:52
Grading comment
Thanks CMJ. I'm also relieved that others found this sentence structure less than clear. Thanks Jeffrey for your research and the new-to-me expression. Unfortunately I'm not sure it would be understood by my readership, many of whom have English as a working (not native) language. :-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6consistent messagexxxCMJ_Trans
2full-court press
Jeffrey Lewis


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


34 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
consistent message


Explanation:
in other words, they must all be singing from the same hymn sheet

BUT with an extra effort at a certain moment in time

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 22:52
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 89
Grading comment
Thanks CMJ. I'm also relieved that others found this sentence structure less than clear. Thanks Jeffrey for your research and the new-to-me expression. Unfortunately I'm not sure it would be understood by my readership, many of whom have English as a working (not native) language. :-)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rob Grayson
3 hrs

agree  Cervin
4 hrs

agree  Patrice
5 hrs

agree  nnaemeka Odimegwu
5 hrs

agree  Jeffrey Lewis: Oops, I really meant to do this at first - of course this meaning is correct
5 hrs

agree  Marc Glinert: this sounds just fine to me CMJ, but I do find the French original a little odd
20 hrs
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
full-court press


Explanation:
If one agency is handling the account, then there is only one hymn sheet anyway. In US English, this particular basketball metaphor is often used to describe this kind of situation (this might actually be a better translation for "surpression", which is a new one on me). A full-court press is a sudden intensification of game play, which ordinarily is not sustained for the whole game. Idiomatically, it is used for situations in which many means to a single end are employed at once, which otherwise might be employed one at a time. You "put on" a full-court press, or you "hit" someone with a full-court press.

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Note added at 6 hrs (2006-08-03 17:32:53 GMT)
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I also meant this answer to be NOT FOR GRADING! Sorry!

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Note added at 6 hrs (2006-08-03 17:35:08 GMT)
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The abstract meaning of "full court press" is "coordinated action" (in several parts, but all at once). That fits in just fine with "consistent message", I think.

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Note added at 6 hrs (2006-08-03 17:51:49 GMT)
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It was only after the phrase became almost endemic that the legal profession picked it up (and only with the explosion of micro-targeted publications - after all, in the legal context it is a pun). In common parlance it means the same thing as "I was all over it like a blanket." Now I wonder what the military equivalent would be - a general advance? Advance all along the line?

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Note added at 7 hrs (2006-08-03 18:07:37 GMT)
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Other forms of this expression (when a metaphor enters common speech, and begins to wear away, eventually becoming a dead metaphor, it produces spinoffs):

full court pressure
put on the press
Press them, keep pressing them, put the pressure on...

(This latter may be seen to rejoin the older idea of (steam) pressure, pressure that builds up to explode, or pressure pressing down to break sth. apart - pure physical pressure. But etymologists and lexicographers know this sort of semantic interweave is frequent. Consider "the dozens" (insult game, early C20, black Americans) vs. "dissin' " (form of "disrespectin' ", same insult game, current as "to diss".)

In basketball, a full court press is actually a defense, but it is an "attacking" defense (the object being to attack the ball at all times without bothering to fall back in a normal defensive set), and it is this attacking aspect which gets picked up in the wider metaphor.

Jeffrey Lewis
United States
Local time: 15:52
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxCMJ_Trans: this could be brilliant but I suspect it would be way over most heads -dont la mienne
44 mins
  -> Yep...only 114 million Google hits for "full court press" (cmj, you know I just like to drop US slang in for fun...)

neutral  Charlie Bavington: Undoubtedly brilliant for a US readership. Your no. of hits seems to apply only to the phrase without quotes, which by page 45 or so means hits for "full court" (in legal sense) creep in. With quotes, it's less than a million :-) [still a fair number!]
1 hr
  -> My first time ever citing Ghits! The legal sense is a follow-on metaphor. Main sense as above - my only point is that the expression has indeed migrated from sports to the point where US people use it without thinking of the game.

neutral  Marc Glinert: The pleasure is all mine, Jeff. Point taken, and, lest we stray (further) into matters of national stereotype and (worse) politics thus risking the wrath of the moderators, perhaps we should leave it there for this question.
15 hrs
  -> This space for rent
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