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tronc de cône de révolution

English translation: truncated cone

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14:53 Dec 15, 2011
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Aerospace / Aviation / Space
French term or phrase: tronc de cône de révolution
patent relating to jet engine

"...est configuré pour émettre une nappe de carburant et d’air mélangés présentant une région de concentration maximale en carburant sensiblement localisée sur un tronc de cône de révolution centré sur l’axe central du système d’injection et ayant un sommet situé à l’entrée de ce système d’injection."

To my surprise I found this expression in GDT, but I have doubts about it: "revolue truncated cone". This word "revolue" produces very little in the way of EN hits. Also there is another term pertaining to mechanics/geometry, "revolute", (e.g. revolute joint - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revolute_joint) so could this be a spelling mistake in GDT?
Needs a person "skilled in the art"!
Also, which is better: "truncated cone" or "(conic) frustum"?
Mpoma
Local time: 12:57
English translation:truncated cone
Explanation:
The de révolution but is largely unnecessary, especially in Everydayspeak, unless you suffer from acute and chronic Cartesianism.

Un cône est une surface réglée définie par une droite (d), appelée génératrice, passant par un point fixe S appelé sommet et un point variable décrivant une courbe plane fermée (c), appelée courbe directrice.
On parle aussi dans ce cas de surface conique.

Cône de révolution[modifier]

Parmi ces surfaces coniques, la plus étudiée est le cône de révolution dans lequel la courbe directrice est un cercle [cf. circular below] de centre O situé dans un plan perpendiculaire [cf. right below] à (SO). Ce cône est appelé de révolution car il peut être généré simplement par la rotation d'une droite (d) passant par S autour d'un axe (Sz) différent de (d). La génératrice du cône fait alors un angle fixe a avec l'axe de rotation.

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cône_(géométrie)#C.C3.B4ne_de_r...

In common usage in elementary geometry, cones are assumed to be right circular, where right means that the axis passes through the centre of the base (suitably defined) at right angles to its plane, and circular means that the base is a circle. Contrasted with right cones are oblique cones, in which the axis does not pass perpendicularly through the centre of the base.[1] In general, however, the base may be any shape, and the apex may lie anywhere (though it is often assumed that the base is bounded and has nonzero area, and that the apex lies outside the plane of the base). For example, a pyramid is technically a cone with a polygonal base
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cone_(geometry)

If you feel it is necessary, then, you could call it a "truncated right circular cone". Which is a complicated way of describing an icecream cone from which you have bitten the bottom, pointed bit so you can then blow into the top end and extrude icecream "toothpaste" from the bottom ... What? Didn't you do that as a kid?


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2011-12-15 15:55:24 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Had you ever considered that every time you press that little button to fix your hair or kill a fly, you are creating a cône de révolution or a "right circular cone"?
Selected response from:

xxxBourth
Local time: 13:57
Grading comment
thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4truncated conexxxBourth


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


59 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
truncated cone


Explanation:
The de révolution but is largely unnecessary, especially in Everydayspeak, unless you suffer from acute and chronic Cartesianism.

Un cône est une surface réglée définie par une droite (d), appelée génératrice, passant par un point fixe S appelé sommet et un point variable décrivant une courbe plane fermée (c), appelée courbe directrice.
On parle aussi dans ce cas de surface conique.

Cône de révolution[modifier]

Parmi ces surfaces coniques, la plus étudiée est le cône de révolution dans lequel la courbe directrice est un cercle [cf. circular below] de centre O situé dans un plan perpendiculaire [cf. right below] à (SO). Ce cône est appelé de révolution car il peut être généré simplement par la rotation d'une droite (d) passant par S autour d'un axe (Sz) différent de (d). La génératrice du cône fait alors un angle fixe a avec l'axe de rotation.

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cône_(géométrie)#C.C3.B4ne_de_r...

In common usage in elementary geometry, cones are assumed to be right circular, where right means that the axis passes through the centre of the base (suitably defined) at right angles to its plane, and circular means that the base is a circle. Contrasted with right cones are oblique cones, in which the axis does not pass perpendicularly through the centre of the base.[1] In general, however, the base may be any shape, and the apex may lie anywhere (though it is often assumed that the base is bounded and has nonzero area, and that the apex lies outside the plane of the base). For example, a pyramid is technically a cone with a polygonal base
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cone_(geometry)

If you feel it is necessary, then, you could call it a "truncated right circular cone". Which is a complicated way of describing an icecream cone from which you have bitten the bottom, pointed bit so you can then blow into the top end and extrude icecream "toothpaste" from the bottom ... What? Didn't you do that as a kid?


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2011-12-15 15:55:24 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Had you ever considered that every time you press that little button to fix your hair or kill a fly, you are creating a cône de révolution or a "right circular cone"?

xxxBourth
Local time: 13:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 147
Grading comment
thanks
Notes to answerer
Asker: Not only did I do that as a kid, I regard it as a point of honour to keep up the practice when least expected as an adult. I didn't in fact know that I did that whenever I, um, kill a fly... but now I know I feel the better for it, thank you. Glad to see that we, as non-nonsense Anglo-Saxons, can just chuck the silly old fussy French Cartesian nonsense, as per usual.

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