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moulière

English translation: gutter

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:moulière
English translation:gutter
Entered by: Meri Buettner
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14:46 Jun 23, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Archaeology / paved roads - historical
French term or phrase: moulière
...lié aux rues pavées, dont certaines possèdent encore leur moulière...

doesn't sound like a mussels park!
Meri Buettner
France
Local time: 20:36
What is "lié"??
Explanation:
That might just shed more light on the matter.

Apart from that:

moulière - Veine tendre dans une pierre d'affûtage ou dans une meule de grès.
[Dicobat] [Also Lexis]

I suppose it is also possible that this might be the name for soft veins in otherwise hard paving stones, and it might be surprising that centuries on the "moulière" is still in place.

Also:

moulière - Terre marécageuse
[Lexis]
I wonder if, by extension from "terre marécageuse", "moulière" refers to the (central (often)) depression or "sewer" in such medieval streets ....

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs 42 mins (2005-06-23 20:29:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Typo? Note too that \"mEulière\" or \"pierre meulière\" is a type of stone used for building houses and walls. Maybe the text is suggesting that people once raided the \"meulière\" stone in roads to use it for building, so it is astonishing to find it still in the streets here ...
Selected response from:

xxxBourth
Local time: 20:36
Grading comment
Well, I've been told by the client that it is a gutter (some of the streets in the historical part of Montpellier have them running down the middle). Oh well...thanks for all the help and I gave this one to Bourth for all of the explanations!
1 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +1What is "lié"??xxxBourth
3mould? shape? bricks?
Sofia Ziskind


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
moulière
mould? shape? bricks?


Explanation:
i don't have anything approaching a definite answer, but maybe this "mouliere" has to do with the masculine "moule." i found some sites on brick-making that use plenty of words with that same root but unfortunately none with "mouliere." could this possibly be a typo or a pun-type joke?? ok ben, bon courage!


    Reference: http://www.brique.be/-frame/Version2/brique/fabrication/moul...
    Reference: http://vie.dargile.chez.tiscali.fr/faconnag.htm
Sofia Ziskind
United States
Local time: 21:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in RussianRussian
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
moulière
What is "lié"??


Explanation:
That might just shed more light on the matter.

Apart from that:

moulière - Veine tendre dans une pierre d'affûtage ou dans une meule de grès.
[Dicobat] [Also Lexis]

I suppose it is also possible that this might be the name for soft veins in otherwise hard paving stones, and it might be surprising that centuries on the "moulière" is still in place.

Also:

moulière - Terre marécageuse
[Lexis]
I wonder if, by extension from "terre marécageuse", "moulière" refers to the (central (often)) depression or "sewer" in such medieval streets ....

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs 42 mins (2005-06-23 20:29:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Typo? Note too that \"mEulière\" or \"pierre meulière\" is a type of stone used for building houses and walls. Maybe the text is suggesting that people once raided the \"meulière\" stone in roads to use it for building, so it is astonishing to find it still in the streets here ...

xxxBourth
Local time: 20:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 57
Grading comment
Well, I've been told by the client that it is a gutter (some of the streets in the historical part of Montpellier have them running down the middle). Oh well...thanks for all the help and I gave this one to Bourth for all of the explanations!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sofia Ziskind: meuliere! millstone! yah i'll bet that's it :-)
1 hr
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