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appareillé

English translation: its high base of rusticated limestone

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:son haut soubassement calcaire appareillé
English translation:its high base of rusticated limestone
Entered by: Nick Lingris
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11:40 Jun 15, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Architecture
French term or phrase: appareillé
Le palais de justice de style éclectique à tendance Renaissance, marque l'apogée de cette période avec son haut soubassement calcaire appareillé à refends et son imposante colonnade d'entrée surplombée du fronton au chiffre de Léopold II.
MSH
Local time: 20:34
its high base of rusticated limestone
Explanation:
The Neufchateau courthouse can be seen here [http://users.win.be/barreau.neufchateau/barnphotospalais.htm] and here [http://www.polfed.be/old_site/gd/revue/142/142_04.htm].
In the front of the building the ‘soubassement’ is just a high base.

Rusticated limestone can be seen in various Google descriptions and images.

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Note added at 5 hrs 30 mins (2005-06-15 17:11:02 GMT)
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Web example:
The building has a high base of rusticated limestone, which contrasts with the pinkish-red of its recessed central bay and the dark yellow brick of ...
Selected response from:

Nick Lingris
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:34
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3...it has a tall groundfloor with tall limestone arcade and imposing colonnade...
Christopher Crockett
4 +3its high base of rusticated limestone
Nick Lingris
4 +2falsejointed / with drafted marginsxxxBourth
4 -1Bonded partition (walls)Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
appareillé
Bonded partition (walls)


Explanation:
Refends is : partition

I can't find a synonym for bonded which is a term used in construction of stones and bricks, but you might be able to word it all appropriately with the rest of the sentence.

Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
France
Local time: 21:34
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: I don't think this would apply in this particular case, Anna. // Oh, sorry, I don't want to make you sad, but 'not agree' is 'not agree'... :-)
1 hr
  -> Oh. Couldn't you have been neutral. It makes me feel better since I've tried.
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
appareillé
falsejointed / with drafted margins


Explanation:
Dusty is right, this is "appareillé à refends".

"Appareillage" is the way the stones or bricks in a wall are fitted together, and is known as the "bond".

A "refend" is a groove worked into a large stone to make it look like two (or more) smaller stones bonded together, OR a "drafted margin", i.e. a flat, chiselled section along the edge of the stone:

refend ... 2/ MAçONN. : petit canal recreusé dans la pierre ou dans un enduit, pour simuler un joint d'appareil; listel soulignant un joint existant entre deux bossages.
[Dicobat]

false joint - A groove routed (and generally pointed) in a solid block of stone to simulate a joint
[Dict. of Architecture and Construction, McGHill]

drafted margin - a smooth uniform border 20 to 50 mm wide worked round the edges of the face of a stone.
[Scott/Penguin Dict of Building]

Which Neufchâteau is this in??

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Note added at 3 hrs 13 mins (2005-06-15 14:54:27 GMT)
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The soubassement IS the \"basement wall\". It is the relatively low (usually) section of wall standing above the ground, often containing small hopper windows, above which lies the \"ground floor\" (resp. 1st floor) which is reached by a series of steps or the \"perron\". The soubassement is often made of a different material to the walls above it.

In much modern housing, in some countries at least, it is the \"foundation wall\", a concrete perimeter wall about 2 feet high below all the outer walls, the rest of the structure being supported by foundation blocks or \"stumps\" leaving a useful crawl space beneath the bottom floor.

xxxBourth
Local time: 21:34
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 539

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Oh, so it's those big, bevel-edged blocks (or block effect) so often used on public buildings?
3 mins

neutral  Christopher Crockett: Ooo, I'd like to agree,but I don't think that there is anything "false" about those joints (seem my added note re "rustication") and we can't use "basement" here, no matter how tempting.It may be that the original Fr. text is incorrect in its terminology.
11 mins

agree  emiledgar: but, a ligne de refend is not necessarily a false line, it can be an actual joint, and a soubassement is just a lower wall, not always a basement.
2 hrs
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
son haut soubassement calcaire appareillé à refends
its high base of rusticated limestone


Explanation:
The Neufchateau courthouse can be seen here [http://users.win.be/barreau.neufchateau/barnphotospalais.htm] and here [http://www.polfed.be/old_site/gd/revue/142/142_04.htm].
In the front of the building the ‘soubassement’ is just a high base.

Rusticated limestone can be seen in various Google descriptions and images.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs 30 mins (2005-06-15 17:11:02 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Web example:
The building has a high base of rusticated limestone, which contrasts with the pinkish-red of its recessed central bay and the dark yellow brick of ...


Nick Lingris
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:34
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
20 hrs
  -> Thanks, Vicky.

agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: set back high limestone base
2 days22 hrs
  -> I think what the original is trying to describe is this [http://www.lookingatbuildings.org.uk/default.asp?document=1....] rather than the set-back aspect of it. Tell me what you think.

agree  Dr Sue Levy
3 days14 hrs
  -> Thanks, Sue, my eyewitness in this case.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
appareillé
...it has a tall groundfloor with tall limestone arcade and imposing colonnade...


Explanation:
From the only .jpgs I can find on the web,

http://www.polfed.be/old_site/rw/revue/142/images/22.jpg

it looks like we have a tall arcade, opening into various rooms on in the ground floor. ("basement" for "soubassement" doesn't seem appropriate here, since the whole thing is well above ground.)


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Note added at 2 hrs 16 mins (2005-06-15 13:57:23 GMT)
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The repetition of \"tall\" is unfortunate.

How about, \"it has a tall groundfloor with a high limestone arcade...\"?

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Note added at 2 hrs 18 mins (2005-06-15 13:59:32 GMT)
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The building dates from the 1880s and looks like it combines elements of the Neo-Classical (*very* late Renaissance) and the Beaux-Arts styles.

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Note added at 2 hrs 40 mins (2005-06-15 14:21:13 GMT)
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In the Neo-Classical style there are terms for that sort of articulation of the ground floor of a building by the use of an
\"appareil\" of rather bold, deep-jointed, large limestone blocks, combined with the arcade giving onto the entrance doorways to the rooms beyond; and the much more \"refined\" treatment of the Piano Nobile (premiere étage) and the stories above.

But I can\'t think what those terms are and don\'t have a copy of Sir Bannister Fletcher\'s \"History of Architecture on the Comparative Method\" to hand.

Bourth?

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Note added at 3 hrs 27 mins (2005-06-15 15:07:41 GMT)
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Re Bourth\'s \"falsejointed\", etc.

I think that, technically, what we have here in the masonry treatment of the exterior wall of that first floor (which is definitely *not* a \"basement\" in English) is one of several forms of \"RUSTICATION\" :

\"Masonry cut in *massive blocks* seperated from each other by *deep joints* [emp. mine], employed to give a rich and bold texture to the exterior wall and normally reserved for the lower part of it.\" (Pevsner\'s _Dictionary of Architecture_]

Normally we think of \"rusticated masonry\" as being rough in surface texture, but, technically, it can also be smooth (as in this case, as best I can make out from that wretched .jpg) --the operative feature being the *deep joints* between the *large stones*, which is what we have here.

Bourth may be right in his translation of the original French text, but, if so, it appears that that text itself is incorrect in its terminology.

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Note added at 5 hrs 35 mins (2005-06-15 17:15:59 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Nick seems to think that it is a question of this facade of the building which is being described:

http://www.polfed.be/old_site/rw/revue/142/images/23.jpg

I\'m assuming that it is this one:

http://www.polfed.be/old_site/rw/revue/142/images/22.jpg

I\'m also assuming that both of these are on the same building.

It seems to me that the description can only apply to

http://www.polfed.be/old_site/rw/revue/142/images/22.jpg


    Reference: http://www.polfed.be/old_site/rw/revue/142/142_04.htm
    Reference: http://www.polfed.be/old_site/rw/revue/142/images/22.jpg
Christopher Crockett
Local time: 15:34
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 79

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  DocteurPC: arcade is right here - I think that's the term Jane was looking for
11 mins
  -> Well, it *is* an arcade and I can't think of something more specialised, though there may well be another term which is appropriate. Neo-Classical is just not my field. Thanks, Docteur.

agree  Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com: Do you mean the ground floor is high ceilinged or whatever appropriate word?
40 mins
  -> Yes, it appears (from that tiny .jpg) that the ground floor is a full "story", and not at all a "basement". We must assume that there are doorways on the inside of that external arcade leading into various rooms in that ground floor. Thanks, Anna Maria.

agree  Tony M: Yes, even without your JPG, that was exactly the image I had in mind; 'soubassement' is very often used for the bottom part of walls (treated differently), but here they seem to go right up as far as the 1st floor...
54 mins
  -> Yes, "soubassement" as anything like a "basement" is clearly a faux amis here. That's a full "[ground] story/floor", entirely above ground level. Of course, there might be a basement under that... Thanks, Dusty.

neutral  Nick Lingris: How about "a high base of rusticated limestone"? // You're looking at the wrong picture. http://www.polfed.be/old_site/rw/revue/142/images/23.jpg and http://users.win.be/barreau.neufchateau/barnphotospalais.htm
2 hrs
  -> I don't think that it is *that* facade of the building which is being described, but rather the one with the arcade in the wall of the "haut soubassement ". Thanks for the thought, Nick.

neutral  Dr Sue Levy: Nick is right - the picture with Colonel Michaux is not the Neufchâteau PdJ - I've been there inside it (to an office in the basement in fact!)
5 hrs
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