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grès flammé

English translation: glazed stoneware (in this situation)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:grès flammé
English translation:glazed stoneware (in this situation)
Entered by: Bruce Berger
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13:52 Jun 17, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Architecture / Art Nouveau
French term or phrase: grès flammé
Art Nouveau architecture, building material
Context:
"...avec l’utilisation de céramique, de **grès flammé** qui couvrent les façades – 14, rue d’Abbeville (10e), 21-21bis, rue Pierre Leroux (7e) –, une exubérance décorative qui va aboutir à des immeubles plus variés, avec des jeux infinis sur les motifs, végétaux, animaux, l’utilisation de dômes, tourelles, petits toits..."
Sara Freitas
France
Local time: 19:51
glazed stoneware (tiles?)
Explanation:
In addition to terra cotta, this material was used frequently to cover facades (as it says here), both in the US and in Europe. As far as I know, it was mostly in the form of tiles, so you might want to say that (or not...)

A pottery example is here: <http://www.libertys.com/li5/lib5324.jpg>

Also, a quote from <http://www.archi.fr/DOCOMOMO-FR/fiche-imm-franklin.htm> (about 3/4 of the way down the page):
"Les cloisons en béton entre les poteaux sont couvertes d’une *peau protectrice en carreaux de grès flammé* aux décors floraux d’Alexandre Bigot."
Selected response from:

Bruce Berger
Local time: 19:51
Grading comment
Thanks, Bruce.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3flambé stoneware
Nick Lingris
5 +1glazed stoneware (tiles?)Bruce Berger
4flame-textured sandstonexxxBourth
4glazed sandstoneemiledgar
3flamed stoneware
DocteurPC
2iridescent and metallic glazes
DarekS


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
grès flammé
iridescent and metallic glazes


Explanation:
Look link below


    Reference: http://66.102.9.104/search?q=cache:dndU6fKgxP4J:www.trocader...
DarekS
Local time: 19:51
Native speaker of: Polish
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
grès flammé
flamed stoneware


Explanation:
I think we are talking about stoneware here, not glazed, but I may be completely off - maybe the other answer is good - I'm not an Art Nouveau specialist - but we are talking decorations on buildings, so stoneware makes sense

DocteurPC
Canada
Local time: 13:51
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Bruce Berger: yes I agree it's flamed stoneware, but it was *almost* always glazed. Nonetheless, I don't know the buildings mentioned, so maybe in this case in would be better to say flamed instead of glazed? Depends on the building...
14 mins
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31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
grès flammé
glazed stoneware (tiles?)


Explanation:
In addition to terra cotta, this material was used frequently to cover facades (as it says here), both in the US and in Europe. As far as I know, it was mostly in the form of tiles, so you might want to say that (or not...)

A pottery example is here: <http://www.libertys.com/li5/lib5324.jpg>

Also, a quote from <http://www.archi.fr/DOCOMOMO-FR/fiche-imm-franklin.htm> (about 3/4 of the way down the page):
"Les cloisons en béton entre les poteaux sont couvertes d’une *peau protectrice en carreaux de grès flammé* aux décors floraux d’Alexandre Bigot."


    Reference: http://www.libertys.com/li5/lib5324.jpg
    Reference: http://www.archi.fr/DOCOMOMO-FR/fiche-imm-franklin.htm
Bruce Berger
Local time: 19:51
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks, Bruce.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dr Sue Levy: This is it Bruce! Bigot was the specialist in grès flammé - http://www.philamuseum.org/collections/acquisitions/newacq-f...
1 day5 hrs
  -> And that's an absolutely *amazing* mantelpiece. Glazed, ouf course... ;-) Thanks!
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
grès flammé
glazed sandstone


Explanation:
Since we don't know if the sandstone has been made into stoneware(tiles), perhaps sandstone would be more apprpriate.

emiledgar
Belgium
Local time: 19:51
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
grès flammé
flame-textured sandstone


Explanation:
While it is true that "grès-cérame" and "grès émaillé" are types of ceramic tile, nothing in the above suggests that "grès flammé" is anything other than "grès" (sandstone) that has been "flammé" (textured in a certain way by exposure to flame). I don't know specifically about "grès flammé", but it is pretty standard to use stone as cladding on buildings, fixing the slabs with adhesives or mechanical fixings.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs 22 mins (2005-06-18 00:15:00 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Only two ghits, and these are they:

Low Moor is a flame textured sandstone. It displays subtle pale to dark reds with occasional swirls and other detail. Areas of the stone show a clear but ...
www.rock-unique.com/htmls/paving/pavingIndex.php - 52k - Cached - Similar pages

Rock Unique - WELCOME
Emberstone is a flame textured sandstone, with colours that are slightly warmer and lighter that the slightly more traditional tones of the Low Moor. ...
www.rock-unique.com/htmls/raj/lemon/lemonDet.php


xxxBourth
Local time: 19:51
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 539
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
grès flammé
flambé stoneware


Explanation:
According to both the Robert and Oxford French-English dictionaries:

Hundreds of links for flambé and "Art nouveau".

Britannica article:
flambé glaze,
a rich, deep-red glaze slashed with streaks of purple and turquoise used to decorate pottery, particularly porcelain. The effect results from a particular method of firing a glaze that incorporates copper; the method was first discovered by the Chinese of the Ming dynasty, probably during the reign of Wan-li (1573-1620). Examples of this old flambé work are now extremely rare. The process was at first difficult to control, but by the reign of Ch'ien-lung (1736-96) in the Ch'ing dynasty it had been mastered, and ch'ui hung, or blown red glaze ware, as flambé work was called, became very popular. The porcelain factory at Sèvres, Fr., produced a substantial amount of flambé work in the late 19th century. The process was revived in modern times by individual potters, notably Bernard Moore in England, who worked at the beginning of the 20th century.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 hrs 49 mins (2005-06-18 01:41:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

“grés” is sandstone in geology, not in ceramics.
The text given by the asker says: “avec l’utilisation de céramique, de grès flammés qui couvrent les façades” (“flammés” should be plural here)
Le Robert gives the following definition for “flammé”: Qui a des taches allongées et ondoyantes. Grès flammé.
The Larousse says: Se dit d’une céramique sur laquelle la caisson a produit des effets de couleurs.
Therefore “flammé” does not describe the process, but the effect on the glaze.

In these pictures of “grés flammés” on the walls of French buildings it is obvious that these are flambé glazed tiles:
http://www.archi.fr/DOCOMOMO-FR/fiche-imm-belliard.htm
http://www.mmpostel.com/Page_18x.htm
http://www.monts14.com/dossiers_divers/paysage_urbain/luttes...
http://lartnouveau.com/artistes/bigot/31_rue_campagne_1e.htm


Nick Lingris
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:51
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Vicky.

agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Jane.

agree  Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Anna (or do you prefer 'Anna Maria')?

neutral  xxxBourth: If it is indeed "flamBé", then maybe, but until further notice it is "flamMé", a term that does exist ...
6 hrs
  -> But is says "avec l’utilisation de céramique" in the original. Please compare Google images of "gres flamme/s" (the original should be in the plural) with images of "flambe glaze". You'll love them.

neutral  DocteurPC: your second example is definitely sandstone and not ceramics - but the last one talks about : carrelage en grés flammé par un céramiste? - great trip with this question
21 hrs
  -> You're right, the gres flamme in the second picture is not as obvious as the sandstone. But it's there. The tiles on the walls. Great trip indeed for such an obvious question. After all, it says 'ceramics' in the asker's question.
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