KudoZ home » French to English » Architecture

grand/petit appareil

English translation: large/small stonework

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:grand/petit appareil
English translation:large/small stonework
Entered by: Miranda Joubioux
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

16:27 Jun 26, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Architecture / Church architecture
French term or phrase: grand/petit appareil
Context : small country chapel in Brittany.

Sa construction remonte à la première moitié du XVIe siècle, en témoigne le mur pignon occidental, en grand appareil.
Le reste de l’édifice, en petit appareil, semble toutefois plus récent, sans doute du XVIIe siècle.

I know that appareil means bond, and I have a definition for grand appareil in Dicobat,

Grand appareil est un appareil de pierre de taille dont les éléments ont l'épaisseur du mur, et un longueur d'au moins 70 cm, pour une hauteur d'au moins 40 cm.

but I'm not sure what the correct term is.
Miranda Joubioux
Local time: 07:51
large/small dimensioned stonework
Explanation:
I'm not sure that i've ever seen a precise English term for these, or at least for the latter.

"Grand appareil" is usually --but not necessarily always-- "ashlar" stonework (i.e., large blocks of "squared up" stones, laid in regular courses).

"Petit appareil" is usually not ashlar, and may be something approaching rubble, usaully set within a heavy mortar.

Indeed, the OED offers "rubble-work" in opposition to "ashlar," but, in my opinion, not *all* "petit appareil" is necessarily "rubble work" --sometimes even small stones are "squared up," though not necessarily retangular in shape (they can be polygonal, for decorative effect).

RUBBLE-WORK:

"Masonry composed of rubble or unwrought stones; also, fragments of stone mixed with mortar and used as a filling-in. "
Selected response from:

Christopher Crockett
Local time: 01:51
Grading comment
Once again, difficult again to choose. I went for the simplest solution since this text is intended for tourists. This seemed the most suitable.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
3 +1large / small format (block/brickwork)xxxBourth
4large/small dimensioned stonework
Christopher Crockett
3large/small stone fitting
Francis MARC


  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
large / small format (block/brickwork)


Explanation:
(where "large/small format" qualifies "brick/block" rather than "brickwork/blockwork")

While I'm not sure it extends to a relationship to the thickness of the wall, "format" refers to the dimensions of bricks, blocks, tiles, etc. just as it is used for paper sizes.

Dicobat actually gives the word too, Scott defines it, and you'll find examples on the Houesbbhe.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 mins (2007-06-26 16:43:39 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If you have a def. of "grand appareil", you must have a different ed. of Dicobat. Not difficult - mine dates from 1996 (2nd ed.).

xxxBourth
Local time: 07:51
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 539

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M
26 mins

neutral  Christopher Crockett: Mmmmm... it definitely refers to the size of the stones being used, but i've never seen "format" used in this context.
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
large/small stone fitting


Explanation:
*

Francis MARC
Lithuania
Local time: 08:51
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 24
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
large/small dimensioned stonework


Explanation:
I'm not sure that i've ever seen a precise English term for these, or at least for the latter.

"Grand appareil" is usually --but not necessarily always-- "ashlar" stonework (i.e., large blocks of "squared up" stones, laid in regular courses).

"Petit appareil" is usually not ashlar, and may be something approaching rubble, usaully set within a heavy mortar.

Indeed, the OED offers "rubble-work" in opposition to "ashlar," but, in my opinion, not *all* "petit appareil" is necessarily "rubble work" --sometimes even small stones are "squared up," though not necessarily retangular in shape (they can be polygonal, for decorative effect).

RUBBLE-WORK:

"Masonry composed of rubble or unwrought stones; also, fragments of stone mixed with mortar and used as a filling-in. "

Christopher Crockett
Local time: 01:51
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 79
Grading comment
Once again, difficult again to choose. I went for the simplest solution since this text is intended for tourists. This seemed the most suitable.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search