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tour creuse, la

English translation: hollow; empty, shallow (figurally); off-peak

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:creux, creuse
English translation:hollow; empty, shallow (figurally); off-peak
Entered by: Valters Feists
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07:45 Apr 1, 2004
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Architecture
French term or phrase: tour creuse, la
Part of a building?

"La tour creuse, haute de 60 m, est échancrée en direction de la cathédrale."

And how is it positioned in relation to the cathedral? What does "échancrée en direction de" mean in this context?

http://home.t-online.de/home/d.g.p.meinhard/frauen/weiss_lou...
http://www.mjth.net/da/strasbourg/
http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&...

Thx.
Valters Feists
Latvia
Local time: 18:46
the hollow tower
Explanation:
The Louise Weiss building is THE Europarliament building in Strasbourg. It is basically a ring, a hollow cylinder, a hollow tower, but on one side the "construction" is not complete. I think there is structure in the "gap", comprising columns and some sort of bracing, but it does not have walls or floors, at least not above the first few floors. It is probably a bit like whichever Greek or Roman arena it is that has collapsed in one place. "Echancré" because the no-structure "opening" gets wider as it gets to the top, IOW the "real" structural part, with offices, walls and glazing etc. is "chamfered back" obliquely. Presumably this "échancrure" is on the cathedral side of the building.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 6 mins (2004-04-01 10:52:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

On closer examination, it appears I\'m not 100% right, for the \"hollow tower\" appears to be only part of the Louise Weiss building complex which also includes a lower building that surrounds the hollow round tower around 180°. In plan view, if the round tower is seen as a head, the rest of the building forms a \"Napoleon\'s hat\" [wouldn\'t they just love that image in Brussels!]

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 27 mins (2004-04-01 11:13:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

<<The steel and glass central tower is cradled by a lower building like a wedge of melon - the whole complex contains 1,133 offices. It was designed by Architecture Studio Europe, a Paris-based company. >>
[http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/399112.stm]

Presumably the \"unfinished\" section is because the building symbolizes \"Europe in the making\":
<<The tower (60 metres high and having a diameter of 94 metres), which is the symbol of \"Europe in the making\", houses 1,133 offices, 468 of which are reserved for the administration and 665 office-bedrooms for the Euro-MPs. The tower, which has an esplanade, is empty in the middle and has 20 floors including fine piece of architecture. >>
[http://www.yomari.com/p-review/1999/04/220499/a.html]


At http://www.europarl.eu.int/abc/visit/stras/images.htm you\'ll find a picture of the \"unfinished\" section (3rd photo up, second from right), looking from the inside of the building to a sunrise or sunset. For this \"échancrure\" to be aligned on the cathedral, it would (if my map reading is right) have to be on the south-western side of the tower, which would correspond pretty well with a setting winter sun in the photo.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 30 mins (2004-04-01 11:16:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

So the part of the building on the cathedral side is \"cut away\" - in fact \"cutaway\" might be a good translation, for it also implies that one can \"look inside\" the building, as in a cutaway diagram.
Selected response from:

xxxBourth
Local time: 17:46
Grading comment
Thanks to both answerers :)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5the hollow towerxxxBourth
3 +1The 60m high, bow-shaped tower/The concave end....John Peterson


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
The 60m high, bow-shaped tower/The concave end....


Explanation:
1. The 60m high, bow-shaped tower juts out in the direction of the cathederal.
Or:
2. The concave end of this 60m high tower juts out in the direction of the cathederal.

Creux/creuse can mean concave and, looking at the pictutres in thelinks below, bow-shaped might work. Given the jagged connotation of échancré(e), jutting out would be my take on this.

It is part of the European Parliament complex in Strasbourg.


    Reference: http://www.scottishtorymeps.org.uk/purvis/photos/archive_200...
    Reference: http://euobs.com/?aid=13908&rk=1
John Peterson
Local time: 16:46
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Hacene
7 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
the hollow tower


Explanation:
The Louise Weiss building is THE Europarliament building in Strasbourg. It is basically a ring, a hollow cylinder, a hollow tower, but on one side the "construction" is not complete. I think there is structure in the "gap", comprising columns and some sort of bracing, but it does not have walls or floors, at least not above the first few floors. It is probably a bit like whichever Greek or Roman arena it is that has collapsed in one place. "Echancré" because the no-structure "opening" gets wider as it gets to the top, IOW the "real" structural part, with offices, walls and glazing etc. is "chamfered back" obliquely. Presumably this "échancrure" is on the cathedral side of the building.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 6 mins (2004-04-01 10:52:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

On closer examination, it appears I\'m not 100% right, for the \"hollow tower\" appears to be only part of the Louise Weiss building complex which also includes a lower building that surrounds the hollow round tower around 180°. In plan view, if the round tower is seen as a head, the rest of the building forms a \"Napoleon\'s hat\" [wouldn\'t they just love that image in Brussels!]

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 27 mins (2004-04-01 11:13:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

<<The steel and glass central tower is cradled by a lower building like a wedge of melon - the whole complex contains 1,133 offices. It was designed by Architecture Studio Europe, a Paris-based company. >>
[http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/399112.stm]

Presumably the \"unfinished\" section is because the building symbolizes \"Europe in the making\":
<<The tower (60 metres high and having a diameter of 94 metres), which is the symbol of \"Europe in the making\", houses 1,133 offices, 468 of which are reserved for the administration and 665 office-bedrooms for the Euro-MPs. The tower, which has an esplanade, is empty in the middle and has 20 floors including fine piece of architecture. >>
[http://www.yomari.com/p-review/1999/04/220499/a.html]


At http://www.europarl.eu.int/abc/visit/stras/images.htm you\'ll find a picture of the \"unfinished\" section (3rd photo up, second from right), looking from the inside of the building to a sunrise or sunset. For this \"échancrure\" to be aligned on the cathedral, it would (if my map reading is right) have to be on the south-western side of the tower, which would correspond pretty well with a setting winter sun in the photo.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 30 mins (2004-04-01 11:16:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

So the part of the building on the cathedral side is \"cut away\" - in fact \"cutaway\" might be a good translation, for it also implies that one can \"look inside\" the building, as in a cutaway diagram.

xxxBourth
Local time: 17:46
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 539
Grading comment
Thanks to both answerers :)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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