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a toutes marges

English translation: full margins / untrimmed

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:a toutes marges
English translation:full margins / untrimmed
Entered by: French Foodie
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20:33 Jul 20, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Art, Arts & Crafts, Painting / art exhibit
French term or phrase: a toutes marges
This comes up in a description of works in an art exhibit. I've googled this and find lots of references to "a toutes marges", especially dealing with old/rare books. I've also found similar pages that have "with all margins" but these all look suspiciously like translations from the French.

Can anyone confirm whether this is in fact the correct way of putting it?

Here is the context:
Outre les dessins inédits et les croquis préparatoires de tableaux connus, l’exposition présentera des travaux photographiques expérimentaux jamais montrés à ce jour : des épreuves déchirées pour les photomontages, des portraits fantomatiques ou ectoplasmiques, des tirages retouchés et un Chaman à toutes marges (un des trois exemplaires connus).

Many thanks in advance
Mara
French Foodie
Local time: 00:21
with (all) margins intact
Explanation:
This is how I read it.

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Note added at 51 mins (2005-07-20 21:24:44 GMT)
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With full margins.
This seems to be the proper term.
Selected response from:

Nick Lingris
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:21
Grading comment
Thanks very much.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2with (all) margins intact
Nick Lingris
5 -1full bleed print by/from ChamanJane Lamb-Ruiz
4with complete borders / full borders intactDavid Vaughn
3altogether marginal/living on the fringes (of society)Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


42 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
with (all) margins intact


Explanation:
This is how I read it.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 51 mins (2005-07-20 21:24:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

With full margins.
This seems to be the proper term.

Nick Lingris
United Kingdom
Local time: 23:21
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Thanks very much.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: From what I've been able to glean, it amounts to 'untrimmed'
12 mins
  -> I'm all for "with full margins" at the moment (11,400 g-hits). Looking for proper documentation.

neutral  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: marge rognées..pas rognées..
21 mins

agree  Michele Fauble
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, Michele.
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
altogether marginal/living on the fringes (of society)


Explanation:
Hi Mara,

I don't think Chaman is an artist or a work of art.
It is about a painting of a "Chaman" who practices shamanism, and who would be considered marginal as they practise supernatural things.

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Note added at 26 mins (2005-07-20 20:59:52 GMT)
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So there are three known examples of this painting of a \"Chaman\" (shaman in English)

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Note added at 59 mins (2005-07-20 21:33:19 GMT)
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Mara,
I found this. Maybe it will help.

CHAMAN multimedia workshop dedicated to cultural heritage - [ Traduire cette page ]
... Via Livenza · LychnoServices · e-antiquity. Rome - The Hypogeum of Via Livenza.
Photography. Return to Via Livenza main page. © CHAMAN · Site Map · Contact.
www.chaman.ch/en/projects/vialivenza/photo_01.html - 3k - En cache - Pages similaires

CHAMAN multimedia workshop dedicated to cultural heritage - [ Traduire cette page ]
CHAMAN multimedia workshop. home · services · cultural projects · products ...
digital photography · 3D photography · video editing · animation ...
www.chaman.ch/en/services/imagia/imagia.html - 3k - En cache - Pages similaires
[ Autres résultats, domaine www.chaman.ch ]



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Note added at 2 hrs 19 mins (2005-07-20 22:52:45 GMT)
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My final answer is: with all the outlines in place

Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
France
Local time: 00:21
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: that is charming..and I mean it...
7 mins

neutral  emiledgar: why would chaman be capitalized?
21 mins
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28 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
full bleed print by/from Chaman


Explanation:
sounds like

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Note added at 28 mins (2005-07-20 21:02:03 GMT)
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when there are no white or other borders on a photograph

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Note added at 31 mins (2005-07-20 21:05:26 GMT)
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chaman is some photography atelier, isn\'t it?

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Note added at 3 hrs 41 mins (2005-07-21 00:15:27 GMT)
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Note for Vaughn:
**The earliest photos of the 20th century are ***full-bleed***, meaning that they do not have a white border surrounding the image as is popular today. The white border appearing on later images was a result of the photographic paper being held in a special holder during enlargement, and this technology was not commonly used until about the mid 1910s.****


Please...

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 89

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  emiledgar: Yes, no borders.
21 mins

disagree  Tony M: I think in fact it is the OPPOSITE of this, Jane --- with the original borders intact, not trimmed off.
27 mins
  -> full bleed does not mean the opposite of intact borders Dusty..you can have intact borders and still have full bleed..

neutral  Nick Lingris: à pleine page
41 mins

disagree  David Vaughn: "Full bleed" is NOT a photography term, but a printing term - the blood is the ink. "Full bleed" is not used in a catalog descriptions of photo. Esp not as you describe - in printing it refers to cutting the paper!
2 hrs
  -> it's a kind of border on a print meaning no border..to print a photograph..I know what full-bleed means, I was a newsletter editor/production supervisor and magazine production person, FYI I didn't describe..someone else did..ta Vaughn...
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14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
with complete borders / full borders intact


Explanation:
Explanation in the notes section.

In photo, "border" is more common, though "margin" is also used.

Note on full bleed: the author Jane quotes uses this term, but it is not a normal photography term to refer to darkroom photos. The clear term for what she and he describe is "borderless". It is however probably the opposite of what is being described here. Jane's author is using the term metaphorically, perhaps educatedly, perhaps not. But it would be an error for a translator to copy his imagery. In French, borderless is "sans marge".


Today, with digital photography, "full bleed" can indeed be a correct term in photo, when the photos are printed on a computer printer, which does use inks, and so can bleed. Perhaps usage in refering to classical photos will change with time, but for the moment this is not the case.

David Vaughn
Local time: 00:21
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 289
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