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contre-courbe

English translation: ogee curves

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:courbes et contre-courbes
English translation:ogee curves
Entered by: ciliegina
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16:03 Oct 28, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Art, Arts & Crafts, Painting / ceramics
French term or phrase: contre-courbe
L’ensemble composé d’une pendulette et de deux vases a ainsi été dessiné dans le goût Louis XV. La silhouette de la pendule est “violonée” ; les contours sont soulignés par des côtes de style rocaille à courbes et contre-courbes. Les deux vases ont une forme appelée « balustre ».
ciliegina
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:22
ogee curves
Explanation:
Hard to tell for sure without actually seeing the object, but it *sounds* like what meant here is "ogee curves", i.e.,

2. a. Archit. and Joinery. More fully ogee mould, ogee moulding. A moulding consisting of a continuous double curve, S-shaped in cross-section, and usually with the upper part convex and the lower part concave; a cyma reversa. Also: a moulding of this kind which is concave above and convex below; a cyma recta.
Sometimes applied indiscriminately to any moulding having an S-shaped cross-section.

d. gen. In full ogee curve: a shallow S-shaped or double curve.

[O.E.D.]

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Note added at 42 mins (2006-10-28 16:45:10 GMT)
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Only problem with this theory is that I believe "ogee" is used in French, as well.

But this author doesn't seem to be very precise in his terminology and a direct translation of "courbes et countre-courbes" isn't really possible ("curves and ogee curves").

What he/she seems to have in mind are "simple" curves (concave or convex) and "complex" ones, S-curves or "ogee curves".

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Note added at 43 mins (2006-10-28 16:46:53 GMT)
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Following the OED (2.d), you could use "double curves".

But I think that "ogees" or "ogee curves" is better.

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Note added at 1 hr (2006-10-28 17:06:05 GMT)
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You are quite welcome, ciliegna.

Now that I look at your text again, I believe that this author is simply using "courbes et contra-courbes" as a description of an S- or ogee curve: it is made up of a concave curve which flows into a convex one (or vice-versa, depending upon how you look at it).

So, your translation would, indeed, be simply "the contours are emphesised by... ogee curves".
Selected response from:

Christopher Crockett
Local time: 02:22
Grading comment
Thank you again!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1ogee curves
Christopher Crockett
3Counter-curve
Cervin


  

Answers


38 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
ogee curves


Explanation:
Hard to tell for sure without actually seeing the object, but it *sounds* like what meant here is "ogee curves", i.e.,

2. a. Archit. and Joinery. More fully ogee mould, ogee moulding. A moulding consisting of a continuous double curve, S-shaped in cross-section, and usually with the upper part convex and the lower part concave; a cyma reversa. Also: a moulding of this kind which is concave above and convex below; a cyma recta.
Sometimes applied indiscriminately to any moulding having an S-shaped cross-section.

d. gen. In full ogee curve: a shallow S-shaped or double curve.

[O.E.D.]

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 42 mins (2006-10-28 16:45:10 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Only problem with this theory is that I believe "ogee" is used in French, as well.

But this author doesn't seem to be very precise in his terminology and a direct translation of "courbes et countre-courbes" isn't really possible ("curves and ogee curves").

What he/she seems to have in mind are "simple" curves (concave or convex) and "complex" ones, S-curves or "ogee curves".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 43 mins (2006-10-28 16:46:53 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Following the OED (2.d), you could use "double curves".

But I think that "ogees" or "ogee curves" is better.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2006-10-28 17:06:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

You are quite welcome, ciliegna.

Now that I look at your text again, I believe that this author is simply using "courbes et contra-courbes" as a description of an S- or ogee curve: it is made up of a concave curve which flows into a convex one (or vice-versa, depending upon how you look at it).

So, your translation would, indeed, be simply "the contours are emphesised by... ogee curves".

Christopher Crockett
Local time: 02:22
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 46
Grading comment
Thank you again!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks so much for your detaile d answer, especially on a Sat. afternoon!

Asker: After the information you gave me I also found this link explaining it. http://www.lookingatbuildings.org.uk/default.asp?Document=2.30&gst=Ogee


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cervin: This makes sense to me with all the useful information
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Counter-curve


Explanation:
Ref: Eurodicatom

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Note added at 14 mins (2006-10-28 16:17:59 GMT)
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Sorry I should've written 'reverse-curve' as that is what it actually says

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Note added at 3 hrs (2006-10-28 19:13:54 GMT)
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Thank you for yopur note. I found this from the British Antique Society on Google-it sort of fits in with what Christopher's info says. Ithought perhaps you might be able to use 'convex' and 'concave'. This is a glossary of antique furniture terms
......The vertical swelling shape of concave and convex curves found on the front or sides of commodes or other cabinet furniture of the Rococo period (qv) (cf serpentine).
and
.......A convex curve between two concave curves (cf serpentine)...

http://www.bafra.org.uk/html_pages/knowledgebase.html


Cervin
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:22
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 16
Notes to answerer
Asker: thanks for replying so fast! I found this too but it doesn't sound quite right in the context. I hope someone might know the right expression in the arts but otherwise I may have to skip the courbe bits and use sculpted.

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