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champ levé

English translation: champ-leve/champ-levé

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:champ levé
English translation:champ-leve/champ-levé
Entered by: Delphine Joly
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

18:30 Mar 24, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Art, Arts & Crafts, Painting / vase decoration
French term or phrase: champ levé
La panse du vase est décorée en champ levé
Paul Hirsh
France
Local time: 20:08
champ-leve/champ-levé
Explanation:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=champ levé

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Note added at 3 mins (2007-03-24 18:34:44 GMT)
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Ethnological and Historical Implications of Certain Phases of Maya Pottery Decoration
http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0002-7294(193607/09)2:38:3<...
Selected response from:

Delphine Joly
Local time: 14:08
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +7champ-leve/champ-levéDelphine Joly
5 +1raised design/champ-levetamaraschuster
5the neck (?) of the vase is adorned with champlevé [enamel?] decoration
Christopher Crockett
4raised relief or champ-levéArchyR
4 -2raised surface
Katarina Peters


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
champ-leve/champ-levé


Explanation:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=champ levé

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Note added at 3 mins (2007-03-24 18:34:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ethnological and Historical Implications of Certain Phases of Maya Pottery Decoration
http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0002-7294(193607/09)2:38:3<...


Delphine Joly
Local time: 14:08
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jock
2 mins
  -> merci

agree  Tony M: OED recognizes it anglicized to champlevé
43 mins
  -> merci

agree  Jim Tucker
3 hrs
  -> merci

agree  Hans G. Liepert: with Tony
4 hrs
  -> merci

neutral  Richard Benham: Always been "champlevé" in English as far as I remember.
7 hrs
  -> merci

agree  Patrick and Carol Collins: The Berner dictionary (the watchmaker's bible) calls it champlevé in English. It is a pretty common term in the field of art & jewellery. But it is spelt as one word ... no hyphen.
15 hrs
  -> merci

agree  Jenny Forbes: I agree that it should be "champlevé" without a hyphen. I believe the term "chased (enamel)" can also be used.
19 hrs
  -> merci

agree  xuebai
21 hrs
  -> merci
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
raised design/champ-leve


Explanation:
Champ-leve is a term that is used in the original French and doesn't require translation. However, depending on the context it could be useful to add the English explanation.

tamaraschuster
Local time: 19:08
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  kironne
14 mins

neutral  Richard Benham: But it's not raised, bits are gouged out and filled with enamel....
11 hrs
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -2
raised surface


Explanation:
literally translated: raised surface decoration

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Note added at 8 hrs (2007-03-25 02:47:47 GMT)
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According to Wikipedia: Champlevé is an enamelling technique in the decorative arts, or an object made by that process, in which troughs or cells are carved into the surface of a metal object, and filled with vitreous enamel. The piece is then fired until the enamel melts, and when cooled the surface of the object is polished. The uncarved portions of the original surface remain visible as a frame for the enamel designs.



Katarina Peters
Canada
Local time: 14:08
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in HungarianHungarian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: The literal translation is not particualrly helpful here, nor the accepted term; it is also slightly misleading
32 mins
  -> comment well taken.

disagree  Richard Benham: The problem, and what makes this "misleading" in Tony's words, is the "levé" in the original French means "removed".//Note: "here". In champlevé the field (background) is removed and replaced with enamel of another colour.
7 hrs
  -> levé also means "raised", "lifted"...however, I think the best is not to translate it, as suggested by Delphine and tamaraschuster.
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1 day22 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
the neck (?) of the vase is adorned with champlevé [enamel?] decoration


Explanation:
As Richard, Tony and others have noted, "champlevé" has been taken over directly in English to describe this technique of applying/creating decoration --though it is almost always used to refer to enamel (*do* you have enamelwork on your vase?).

A quick Google on the term (without the hyphen) will turn up a great many hits in English.

Richard has correctly explained how Katarina's otherwise quite rational answer is not quite right.

Those who expect Rationality in French should seek it elsewhere.

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Note added at 1 day22 hrs (2007-03-26 16:57:12 GMT)
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I'm not happy with "neck" for "panse", but I'm not sure what, exactly, is meant and don't have access to a dictionary at present. "Collar" might be more appropriate, depending upon the shape of the vase.

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Note added at 1 day22 hrs (2007-03-26 17:07:09 GMT)
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Though I have seen the term often enough in English art history texts, I'm not an expert on its precise origin.

That " 'levé' in the original French means 'removed' " doesn't sound particularly right, to my ear.

I would guess that "levé" refers rather to the fact that the field ("champ") which is created by the hollowing out of the surface of the metal is then "raised" by the sprinkling of colored glass-powder or paste, which then fuses back into a kind of glass when it is baked in the oven.

The basic distinction is between one major type of enamel and another --"champlevé" vs. "cloisonée".

In the latter, metal (usually, in the old stuff, gold) wires are affixed to the flat surface of the metal, making up little "walls" ("cloisons") which seperate the "fields" of color which go to make up the image, etc.

Googling will provide plenty of examples of both types.

Christopher Crockett
Local time: 14:08
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 46
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2 days5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
raised relief or champ-levé


Explanation:
Can be translated as raised relief or champ-levé

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Note added at 2 days6 hrs (2007-03-27 00:35:39 GMT)
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panse, I believe, refers to the body or belly of the vase not the neck


    Reference: http://www.archaeologicalresource.com
ArchyR
Local time: 11:08
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Christopher Crockett: No, definitely *not* "raised relief"; and, "champlevé", without the hyphen. As for "panse", yes. I had never seen the term before and didn't have access to a dictionary.
2 days19 hrs
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