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Carillon

English translation: Carillon (bells)

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12:06 Aug 28, 2008
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Art, Arts & Crafts, Painting / projet de carillon
French term or phrase: Carillon
Translation of a project of installation of "carillon" (chimes) in the Parc de la Villette. Can we use the word "carillon" in English? Installing a set of chimes seems to lack all the elegance of the word "carillon". Thanks for your feedback!
Laura Wheeler
English translation:Carillon (bells)
Explanation:
Like you, I think 'carillon' is much more evocative than 'chimes'. Perhaps if you add 'bells' it would be more explicit.
Selected response from:

Emma Paulay
France
Local time: 09:18
Grading comment
thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6yes, you can use it.lindaellen
5 +1carillon
Christopher Crockett
4bells
Sue Crocker
3Carillon (bells)
Emma Paulay


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
yes, you can use it.


Explanation:
see the wiki entry.


    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carillon
lindaellen
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jean-Louis S.: In most dictionaries.
11 mins

agree  David Vaughn: Yes, it is commonly used.
16 mins

agree  xxxdaruuntje
36 mins

agree  sktrans
44 mins

agree  writeaway: with jlsjr-and there is lots of info on the www
59 mins

agree  Helen Shiner
1 day4 hrs
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
bells


Explanation:
bells are generally much more substantial than chimes - in churches for example we talk about bells

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Note added at 10 mins (2008-08-28 12:16:41 GMT)
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unless the thing being installed is a carillon - this term is used in English to describe a very large musical instrument that includes a large number of bells see the following link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carillon

Sue Crocker
Canada
Local time: 04:48
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christopher Crockett: Yes, it depends upon what is intended, here most likely a free-standing set of bells (as oppsed to a set of bells in a church tower, for example).
20 mins

disagree  David Vaughn: Nope, not at La Villette - this is not an old-fashioned bell tower with a few big bells, but rather a carillon, a musical instrument first & foremost.
36 mins
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Carillon (bells)


Explanation:
Like you, I think 'carillon' is much more evocative than 'chimes'. Perhaps if you add 'bells' it would be more explicit.


    www.didierlannoy.com/docs/carillon-villette.pdf (just to show what it is)
    Reference: http://www.geocities.com/Vienna/1006/
Emma Paulay
France
Local time: 09:18
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 27
Grading comment
thanks!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

34 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
carillon


Explanation:
In this case it appears that it is going to be a free-standing set of bells --i.e., essentially a musical instrument consisting of bells.

Technically (according to the O.E.D. and the Grove Dictionary of Music) a CARILLON is

‘A set of bells so hung and arranged as to be capable of being played upon either by manual action or by machinery’ (Grove).

Which would also apply to a set of bells in a church tower --but there is no such church tower in your example, I assume.

So, it's a question of a carillion, like this one not far from where I sit as we speak:

http://entertainment.webshots.com/photo/2763376090059138099B...

http://www.bloomingpedia.org/wiki/Arthur_R._Metz_Memorial_Ca...

Nothing there but bells, in a freestanding tower.

"Chimes" doesn't really fit here:

CHIME

2. a. An apparatus or arrangement for striking a bell or set of bells so as to make it or them ‘chime’ or emit a musical sound.

b. spec. (Usu. in pl.) Such an arrangement used as a door-bell.

3. Hence, A set of bells in a church tower, etc., so attuned as to give forth a succession of musical notes, or to be capable of playing tunes when thus struck, or when slightly swung.... Applied also to the small set of hand-bells used in the R.C. Ch. service; the set of bells with their strikers in an organ or musical box, etc.
4. The series of musical sounds, or tune, played on such sets of bells when struck in succession.

Example sentence(s):
  • http://entertainment.webshots.com/photo/2763376090059138099BitxNs
Christopher Crockett
Local time: 03:18
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 46

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cervin
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, Cervin.
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