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pitchounette

English translation: Little one

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:pitchounette
English translation:Little one
Entered by: Yolanda Broad
Options:
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20:01 Jun 3, 2002
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary / General (slang, perhaps?)
French term or phrase: pitchounette
No context available, sorry.
tempProzUsrnm
Local time: 05:55
explanation
Explanation:
Pitchoun and Pitchounette stem from the Provençal and mean "small one", "kiddie", in the masculine and feminine.
It is not only the title of a work.

HTH

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-06-04 08:49:17 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here an excerpt of the \"Dictionnaire Encyclopédique Grand Larousse Universel\" (and then you Anglophones find the right term in English, I wish here only to contribute a \"précision\"):

Pitchoun, e - adjectif ou Pitchounet, ette, adjectif et nom (provençal \"pitchoun, petit).
Term exprimant la tendresse à l\'égard d\'un petit enfant, de quelqu\'un qu\'on protège.

So Yolanda was right about the \"endearing\" aspect.

HTH


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-06-04 08:49:55 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Not a \"slang\" term.
HTH
Selected response from:

Guereau
France
Local time: 14:55
Grading comment
Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6explanationGuereau
5 +3pumpkinMadang
4Wee queennie...
irat56
4cute, sweet, cutie-pie (and so on)
Arthur Borges
3 +1Pitchounette
Yolanda Broad


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Pitchounette


Explanation:
Should be capitalized. It is a (nick)name/term of affection. Also, the title of a book:

Le papa de Pitchounette
Christianne Pesch Septembre 2001. Illustrations de l'histoire inédite
"Le papa de Pitchounette". Chère Agnes Juste par plaisir et ...
agnes-bertron.com/suites/pesch/pesh.htm


    Reference: http://www.google.com/search?q=pitchounette
Yolanda Broad
United States
Local time: 08:55
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 1547

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Fernando Muela
2 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
explanation


Explanation:
Pitchoun and Pitchounette stem from the Provençal and mean "small one", "kiddie", in the masculine and feminine.
It is not only the title of a work.

HTH

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-06-04 08:49:17 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here an excerpt of the \"Dictionnaire Encyclopédique Grand Larousse Universel\" (and then you Anglophones find the right term in English, I wish here only to contribute a \"précision\"):

Pitchoun, e - adjectif ou Pitchounet, ette, adjectif et nom (provençal \"pitchoun, petit).
Term exprimant la tendresse à l\'égard d\'un petit enfant, de quelqu\'un qu\'on protège.

So Yolanda was right about the \"endearing\" aspect.

HTH


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-06-04 08:49:55 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Not a \"slang\" term.
HTH


Guereau
France
Local time: 14:55
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in pair: 330
Grading comment
Thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yolanda Broad: I'm glad to learn which French dialect/language this is from. I knew it had to be something fairly southern, but didn't know which part.
3 mins

agree  Linda Young
5 mins

agree  Florence B
8 mins

agree  Alexandra Hague: "Little one" may also be a good alternative.
20 mins

agree  xxxninasc
6 hrs

agree  suzanten: "Little one" is prefered to "small one"
12 hrs
  -> I leave that up to the Anglophones
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
cute, sweet, cutie-pie (and so on)


Explanation:
Meaning an adjective

Arthur Borges
China
Local time: 20:55
PRO pts in pair: 404
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

51 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Wee queennie...


Explanation:
To keep a regional fragrance, even if haggis has nothing to do with tomatoes...

irat56
France
Local time: 14:55
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 372
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
pumpkin


Explanation:
This provençal word is used as an endearing term towards children in the same way as "little one" of which it is the litteral translation, or "honey", or
"pumpkin" or...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-06-04 02:58:29 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry... literal

Madang
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  zaphod
5 hrs

agree  marycb
9 hrs

agree  Yolanda Broad: Good equivalent!
4 days
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