KudoZ home » French to English » Art/Literary

enfant perdu

English translation: lost child

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:Enfant perdu
English translation:lost child
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

01:22 Jan 1, 2003
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
French term or phrase: enfant perdu
I'm not really sure if it' really latin, but other examples around this one were.
Jared A. Kime
forlorn hope
Explanation:
If it´s French, it´s "lost child". But what this means when used in English is a lot more, and doesn´t mean a child at all.

It is very evocative, and thus difficult to explain. It means a person who has become lost, with the sense of going bad. "desperado, rashling[obs], madcap, daredevil, Hotspur, fire eater, bully, bravo, Hector, scapegrace, enfant perdu[Fr]; Don Quixote, knight- errant, Icarus; adventurer; gambler, gamester; dynamitard[obs]; boomer [obs][U. S.]." - from the first reference.

In the plural, "Enfants perdus ("lost children"): a French military term, denoting scouts sent into enemy territory and not expected to return."

"Sailors are les enfants perdus, “the forlorn hope of the world;” they are fellows that bid defiance to terror, and maintain a constant war with the elements; who, by the magic of their art, trade in the very confines of death, and are always posted within shot, as I may say, of the grave." - from Daniel Defoe (1660 - 1731), second reference.

Selected response from:

Chris Rowson
Local time: 23:59
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +10lost child
Chinoise
5 +7forlorn hopeChris Rowson


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +10
lost child


Explanation:
lost child

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-01 01:30:03 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

This is French.

Chinoise
Local time: 18:59
Native speaker of: Native in ChineseChinese
PRO pts in pair: 14

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cristina Moldovan do Amaral
1 hr

agree  JCEC
2 hrs

agree  JH Trads
2 hrs

agree  Louise Dupont
2 hrs

agree  Paula Ibbotson
3 hrs

agree  Simon Charass
4 hrs

agree  Paul Stevens
7 hrs

agree  Peter Bagney
8 hrs

agree  xxxEDLING
10 hrs

agree  Amy Williams
10 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +7
forlorn hope


Explanation:
If it´s French, it´s "lost child". But what this means when used in English is a lot more, and doesn´t mean a child at all.

It is very evocative, and thus difficult to explain. It means a person who has become lost, with the sense of going bad. "desperado, rashling[obs], madcap, daredevil, Hotspur, fire eater, bully, bravo, Hector, scapegrace, enfant perdu[Fr]; Don Quixote, knight- errant, Icarus; adventurer; gambler, gamester; dynamitard[obs]; boomer [obs][U. S.]." - from the first reference.

In the plural, "Enfants perdus ("lost children"): a French military term, denoting scouts sent into enemy territory and not expected to return."

"Sailors are les enfants perdus, “the forlorn hope of the world;” they are fellows that bid defiance to terror, and maintain a constant war with the elements; who, by the magic of their art, trade in the very confines of death, and are always posted within shot, as I may say, of the grave." - from Daniel Defoe (1660 - 1731), second reference.




    Reference: http://www.chem.leeds.ac.uk/roget/entries/863.html
    Reference: http://etext.library.adelaide.edu.au/d/d31es/part11.html
Chris Rowson
Local time: 23:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Paul Stevens: This can certainly be the wider meaning of the phrase
1 hr

agree  Peter Bagney
2 hrs

agree  irat56: Absolutely! Happy New Year!
3 hrs
  -> Happy New Year!

agree  lauravienna
5 hrs

agree  flaviofbg
5 hrs

agree  Joseph Brazauskas
8 hrs

agree  Peter Coles: Entirely possible given that this has been posted to the art/literary section. More context would be helpful [as always :-)]
10 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search