KudoZ home » French to English » Art/Literary

vicus

English translation: vicus

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:vicus
English translation:vicus
Entered by: Paula Price
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

11:20 May 21, 2003
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
French term or phrase: vicus
le musée de la Porte est un authentique « musée de pays » dont la dizaine de sections (section du trésor d’art du doyenné de Tubize, section gallo-romaine avec une riche collection d’objets découverts dans le vicus de Liberchies, section des témoins de la vie paysanne, etc.) reflètent l’histoire locale de l’entité tubizienne.

Context: Museums in Tubize in Belgium.
Paula Price
Local time: 17:48
vicus
Explanation:
c'est un mot latin

... ARCHEOLOGY. ... DALHEIM Large vicus (whose origins date back to about 20 BC) on the
Roman road from Trier to Metz, constituted by many dwellings and public ...
www.ont.lu/geology.htm - 24k

RAFAEL LARCO HERRERA ARCHAEOLOGICAL MUSEUM - [ Traduire cette page ]
... have improved, and archeology has turned into a profession, there are now many conclusions
and theories about these pieces and their value within the Vicus and ...
museolarco.perucultural.org.pe/english/exposici1.htm - 10k -

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-21 11:30:09 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Le gîte d\'étape romain
Les vestiges recueillis datent le site de la fin du Ier siècle de notre ère. C\'est à cette époque que les légions romaines introduisent en Alsace l\'art de cultiver la vigne et de faire du vin. Dominant la voie romaine passant au pied de la colline, ce vicus routier pouvait contenir une population dense, abritée par un toit, sans chauffage ni confort. Courriers à cheval, hommes de liaison, population tant civile que militaire y faisaient étape pour se restaurer et camper.
Selected response from:

Francis MARC
Lithuania
Local time: 19:48
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +4vicus
Francis MARC
5 +1Village, district or even big farm
irat56
4 +2vicus
Florence B
5Oddie's right.
Christopher Crockett
3neigbourhood, small cityAlbert Golub
3outskirts, suburbsLucinda


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
vicus


Explanation:
c'est un mot latin

... ARCHEOLOGY. ... DALHEIM Large vicus (whose origins date back to about 20 BC) on the
Roman road from Trier to Metz, constituted by many dwellings and public ...
www.ont.lu/geology.htm - 24k

RAFAEL LARCO HERRERA ARCHAEOLOGICAL MUSEUM - [ Traduire cette page ]
... have improved, and archeology has turned into a profession, there are now many conclusions
and theories about these pieces and their value within the Vicus and ...
museolarco.perucultural.org.pe/english/exposici1.htm - 10k -

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-21 11:30:09 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Le gîte d\'étape romain
Les vestiges recueillis datent le site de la fin du Ier siècle de notre ère. C\'est à cette époque que les légions romaines introduisent en Alsace l\'art de cultiver la vigne et de faire du vin. Dominant la voie romaine passant au pied de la colline, ce vicus routier pouvait contenir une population dense, abritée par un toit, sans chauffage ni confort. Courriers à cheval, hommes de liaison, population tant civile que militaire y faisaient étape pour se restaurer et camper.

Francis MARC
Lithuania
Local time: 19:48
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 6500

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Florence B
4 mins
  -> bonjour et merci

agree  Mario Marcolin
1 hr

agree  Gayle Wallimann
4 hrs

agree  Shog Imas
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
vicus


Explanation:
Leave it in Latin -

vicus
Ce terme latin désigne une agglomération de taille moyenne dans l’Antiquité et le haut Moyen Age

"The stones from the fort and the vicus were taken to build the new town of Maryport."
http://museums.ncl.ac.uk/wallnet/sen/Vicus.htm



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-21 11:29:41 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"VICUSSN A district, suburb or quarter of a town or village adjacent to a fort, with the lowest legal status accorded to a built up area \"
http://www.rchme.gov.uk/thesaurus/mon_types/V/68755.htm

\"The Vicus

Outside many Roman forts was a town (vicus) where merchants and craftsmen lived who supplied the Roman army with food, equipment, horses and other goods. Some of these people were from other parts of the Roman Empire but others were local poeple.\"

http://cpat.powys.org.uk/english/romans/recon/default.htm


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-21 11:30:49 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Francis est plus rapide mais je laisse pour les références

Florence B
France
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 753

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christopher Crockett: Francis was first, but not on the mark. Your last reference works for a "section gallo-romaine" of a "doyenné de Tubize." I'll expand on it a bit below.
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, but F. gave the right term first :-)

agree  xxxntouzet
6 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
neigbourhood, small city


Explanation:
Le terme de vicus était au fond une notion collective pour tous les types d'implantation qui n'avaient pas le statut de ville (municipium, colonia) ou de domaine rural (villa rustica). Ainsi, le terme de vicus désignait pour les Romains tant un 'quartier urbain' et une 'rangée de maisons' qu'une implantation plus importante que ses fonctions nous feraient qualifier aujourd'hui de 'petite ville de province'.
good luck

Albert Golub
Local time: 18:48
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in pair: 359
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Village, district or even big farm


Explanation:
From Latin :Vicus, i, M.
"1) Borough, Village,
2) District, Street
3) Country estate,Share cropping farm, farm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-21 13:39:24 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

cf towns in France such as \"Vic-sur -Cère\" and...mashed potatoes \"VICO\"!!

irat56
France
Local time: 18:48
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 372

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  chaplin: dictrict comes first in my Latin dictionary
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
outskirts, suburbs


Explanation:
c'est un mot latin.

Lucinda
Local time: 13:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Oddie's right.


Explanation:
Leave it in Latin, italicised or in quotes, as it is too difficult (and not the job of the translator) to figure out precisely what is meant here.

The entry for "VICUS" in Niermeyer's _Lexique latin médiéval. Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus_ (the best modern dictionary of Medieval latin) runs to nearly three closely spaced pages, so there's plenty of room for interpretation :
1. village, settlement of some importance, not being an episcopal city ;
2. settlement near an episcopal city ;
3. settlement near a large monastery ;
4. estate ;
5. in administrative texts: subdivision of the country ;
6. in ecclesiastical texts: settlement with a parish church... ;
7. merchant's settlement, trading town ;
8. shipping-centre or centre of river-fishing ; [clearly not this one]
9. centre of salt-winning [nor this one] ;
10. mining-centre (silver) [ditto] ;
11. fortified place, borough (burgus) ;
12. street ; [this usage dates from the Carolingian period, 9th c.].

The common thread here is a "settlement" ("Liberchies", in this case), of some type, sometimes one which is connected to some larger, more important agglomeration, a city, "castle," or monastery.

I see now that I misread the "doyenné de Tubize" to be connected with the "section gallo-romaine...d’objets...de Liberchies", which, of course, it is not.
Leave the Latin, and give Oddie the points.

Christopher Crockett
Local time: 12:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 436
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search