KudoZ home » French to English » Art/Literary

mascaron

English translation: grotesque mask

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:mascaron
English translation:grotesque mask
Entered by: Vladimir Suda
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

17:41 Mar 3, 2004
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
French term or phrase: mascaron
"Les mascarons du palais Rohan, construit entre 1730 et 1742, ont fait florès à travers toute la ville." What exactly is "mascarons"?
Vladimir Suda
Czech Republic
Local time: 05:36
grotesque mask
Explanation:
Domaine(s)
  – Symbols, Motifs and Ornaments
(Art)
Domaine(s)
  – Symboles, motifs et ornements
(Arts)
 
grotesque mask Source

mascaron Source CORRECT,
MASC

OBS – a sculpture
ornamental pattern. Source

DEF – Tête grotesque ou
fantastique d'homme, de
femme ou d'animal présentée
de face. Source

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-03-03 17:45:09 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Termium
Selected response from:

GILOU
France
Local time: 05:36
Grading comment
This indeed comes as close as possible to the desired meaning. Thank you all, I am using this now ... see what happens...
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
3 +8grotesque mask
GILOU
4gargoyleKatarina Dolejsiova


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +8
grotesque mask


Explanation:
Domaine(s)
  – Symbols, Motifs and Ornaments
(Art)
Domaine(s)
  – Symboles, motifs et ornements
(Arts)
 
grotesque mask Source

mascaron Source CORRECT,
MASC

OBS – a sculpture
ornamental pattern. Source

DEF – Tête grotesque ou
fantastique d'homme, de
femme ou d'animal présentée
de face. Source

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-03-03 17:45:09 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Termium

GILOU
France
Local time: 05:36
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 2482
Grading comment
This indeed comes as close as possible to the desired meaning. Thank you all, I am using this now ... see what happens...

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mihaela Sinca
1 min

agree  Valentini Mellas: Hehe ... You got me as I was pressing enter ... I add the site I cited (http://www.aime-peintre-sculpteur.com/sculptures-bas-reliefs... and the additional source of Larousse and retract my answer because it's identical :D
1 min

agree  Tom Bishop
12 mins

agree  Hacene
21 mins

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
58 mins

agree  Azure
2 hrs

agree  xxxBourth: Been there, done that, check(ed) the glossaries.
4 hrs

agree  mannix
20 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
gargoyle


Explanation:

another, more concise English term for this...

"The term gargoyle, comes from the Latin gurgulio, and the Old French gargouille, not only meaning "throat" but also describing the "gurgling" sound made by water as it ran through the figure. Superstition held that gargoyles frightened away evil spirits while serving their practical function. After the lead drainpipe was introduced in the sixteenth century, gargoyles primarily served a decorative function.

Although most have grotesque features, the term gargoyle has come to include all types of images. Some gargoyles were depicted as monks, combinations of real animals and people, many of which were humorous. Unusual animal mixtures, or chimeras, did not act as rainspouts and are more properly called grotesques. They serve more as ornamentation, but are now synonymous with gargoyles.

Gargoyles can be found in many types of Gothic architecture, but they are usually associated with the great churches and cathedrals of Europe"...


    Reference: http://www.gargoyles.org/history.html
Katarina Dolejsiova
United States
Local time: 22:36
Native speaker of: Native in SlovakSlovak
PRO pts in pair: 3
Grading comment
This is indeed a similar artefact, but I would use gargoyle where French has gargouille which is the real equivalent.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)
The asker has declined this answer
Comment: This is indeed a similar artefact, but I would use gargoyle where French has gargouille which is the real equivalent.




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search