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gradine, chasse, laie dentelée

English translation: definitions

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15:32 Mar 8, 2004
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
French term or phrase: gradine, chasse, laie dentelée
"Comme au Moyen Âge, ils utilisent massettes, gradines, chasses, laies dentelées et autres instruments, tout en intégrant les techniques actuelles"

The sentence refers to restorers = renovators of ancient monuments.
Vladimir Suda
Czech Republic
Local time: 05:31
English translation:definitions
Explanation:
laye ou laie - Désigne 2 types de marteaux de tailleur de pierre et de maçon : l'un, à 2 têtes tranchantes dont une dentée en grain d'orge, sert à piquer les pierres et à dresser leurs parements; on l'appelle aussi 'brette', our 'marteau bretté' ; l'autre a une tête tranchante (non dentée dans le case de la laie de maçon), et une panne carrée.
The English given is "toothed hammer", but I'm convinced there is better. There must be something in the glossaries because the question has been asked - and answered - before.
"Bush hammer" sounds appropriate.

chasse - large ciseau de tailleur de pierre. The Dict. gives 'pitching chisel" as the English. The illustration shows a broad-bladed cold chisel.

gradine - ciseau de tailleur de pierre à tranchant dentelé ; la gradine sert surtout à atténuer les fortes aspérités de surface laissées par le poinçon et le têtu.
The illustration shows a chisel identical in all respects to the chasse, except that the blade is toothed.
The English proposed is 'gradine' (SOED corroborates) and 'waster'.

[All from Dicobat]

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-03-08 17:58:09 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Waster 1) A mason\'s chisel, either one with a claw cutting edge for wasting stone or a chisel 19 mm wide
[http://www.dreamghar.com/wdic.html]

Dressing stone blocks for use in buildings involved the removing of irregularities in the faces of the stone with a stone hammer followed by a hammer and chisel. There were several tools used in this process. Firstly the stone was dressed by being struck directly with a stone hammer, or a hammer with a blade on one side and a flat hammer face on the other, or a hammer with a blade on both sides (called a maul). [ not what I understand as a maul, but this appears to be the same as the LAYE ]
Once irregularities had been removed from the face of the stone, the dressing of the block was refined. This process involved the use of chisels of varying forms to arrive at a surface that could then be faced. The chisels used either had a smooth edge, called a straight chisel (or scalprum in Latin) [ CHASSE, then ], or were toothed, called a claw chisel (gradine).
[http://www.acrearchaeology.org/building.htm]

The site has an illustration of these tools. The straight and claw chisels are identical to the illustrations in the French book I refer to. The \'cutting hammer\" is pretty similar to the illustrations of \'layes\'. It also shows a \'kivel\' or \'stone mason\'s hammer\' which differs in that one of the blades is at right-angles to the shaft.

GRADINE. A kind of puncheon used by the Marble worker.

claw chisel - A stoneworking chisel with the blade fashioned into small teeth. It is used for shaping and leaves striations in the stone surface. A \"dente di cane\" (Italian for \"dog\'s teeth\") is type of claw chisel having six or so fine notches in its carving edge. A claw chisel with two long points is know as a calcagnolo (Italian) or as a pied de biche (French). Also see bush hammer and drove.

However, bush hammer does not appear to fit :
bush hammer - A steel stone-carving tool, often with a large, brick-like head, having two striking ends, each covered with rows of pyramidal metal points. Found in several sizes, some with a longer, thinner head. Bush hammers are used to dress the surface of stone by breaking down the rock surface, pounding and removing small amounts at a time. The textures achieved are typical among finish in traditional French masonry. Granite and other igneous rock is worked with a bush hammer, although now it is usually an electrically motorized version. Also called by its French name, \"bouchard\" or \"boucharde.\" Also see ballpein hammer, claw hammer, and mallet.

drove - In carving stone, a flat chisel with a broad head [ CHASSE?? ] generally used only for rough hewing. Also, a stone surface dressed with such a chisel. Also see claw chisel and tools.
[http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/Ci.html]


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-03-08 18:06:16 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Stone hammer, a hammer formed with a face at one end, and a thick, blunt edge, parallel with the handle, at the other, -- used for breaking stone
Selected response from:

xxxBourth
Local time: 05:31
Grading comment
Thanks; exhaustive and helpful.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2definitionsxxxBourth
4 +1gradine .... kevelhodierne
2 +1couple of suggestions/guesses
Jonathan MacKerron


  

Answers


22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
gradine .... kevel


Explanation:
Sorry, I don't speak German.
Gradine: tool of a sculptor to do the rough work, the cutting edge is provided with teeth
Laie, marteau bretté : Kevel: Hammer which has a cutting edge at one end and a pint at the other, used to cut and dress stone.
Could find no equivalent for Chasse in English, for which I enclose an explanation in French.
Outil servant à chasser ou à casser la pierre suivant une ligne déterminée.

Note(s) :
Autrefois, la chasse était un marteau à têtes rectangulaires dont l'une était acérée et l'autre pas. Aujourd'hui, c'est une sorte de ciseau métallique avec un manche de bois sur lequel le tailleur de pierre frappe avec la face rectangulaire de sa massette; la chasse du tailleur de pierre tendre est tranchante; celle du tailleur de pierre dure ne l'est pas.



hodierne
France
Local time: 05:31
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in pair: 96

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxBourth: Kevel given by SOED as Scottish and northern dialectical.
1 hr
  -> Thanks, I'll remember !

agree  Hacene: http://www.castles-of-britain.com/castlezc.htm ; http://www.newyorkcarver.com/masontool.htm where you learn chasse= Pitcher & laie (laye)= lump hammer
1 hr
  -> Thanks
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
couple of suggestions/guesses


Explanation:
Webster= gradine (a toothed chisel used by sculptors)
Harrap's laie = bush hammer
Robert for chasse = "Battant du métier à tisser.?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 37 mins (2004-03-08 16:09:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

chasse could be some sort of punch

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 42 mins (2004-03-08 16:14:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

you might get around the need for an exact translation by \"In addition to modern techniques they utilized chisels, hammers and punches that were used during the Middle Ages\" or words to that effect


Jonathan MacKerron
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 963

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
1 hr

disagree  Hacene: you need to used the right terminology considering the purpose of the translation
1 hr

agree  xxxBourth: with the paraphrase, if required
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
definitions


Explanation:
laye ou laie - Désigne 2 types de marteaux de tailleur de pierre et de maçon : l'un, à 2 têtes tranchantes dont une dentée en grain d'orge, sert à piquer les pierres et à dresser leurs parements; on l'appelle aussi 'brette', our 'marteau bretté' ; l'autre a une tête tranchante (non dentée dans le case de la laie de maçon), et une panne carrée.
The English given is "toothed hammer", but I'm convinced there is better. There must be something in the glossaries because the question has been asked - and answered - before.
"Bush hammer" sounds appropriate.

chasse - large ciseau de tailleur de pierre. The Dict. gives 'pitching chisel" as the English. The illustration shows a broad-bladed cold chisel.

gradine - ciseau de tailleur de pierre à tranchant dentelé ; la gradine sert surtout à atténuer les fortes aspérités de surface laissées par le poinçon et le têtu.
The illustration shows a chisel identical in all respects to the chasse, except that the blade is toothed.
The English proposed is 'gradine' (SOED corroborates) and 'waster'.

[All from Dicobat]

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-03-08 17:58:09 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Waster 1) A mason\'s chisel, either one with a claw cutting edge for wasting stone or a chisel 19 mm wide
[http://www.dreamghar.com/wdic.html]

Dressing stone blocks for use in buildings involved the removing of irregularities in the faces of the stone with a stone hammer followed by a hammer and chisel. There were several tools used in this process. Firstly the stone was dressed by being struck directly with a stone hammer, or a hammer with a blade on one side and a flat hammer face on the other, or a hammer with a blade on both sides (called a maul). [ not what I understand as a maul, but this appears to be the same as the LAYE ]
Once irregularities had been removed from the face of the stone, the dressing of the block was refined. This process involved the use of chisels of varying forms to arrive at a surface that could then be faced. The chisels used either had a smooth edge, called a straight chisel (or scalprum in Latin) [ CHASSE, then ], or were toothed, called a claw chisel (gradine).
[http://www.acrearchaeology.org/building.htm]

The site has an illustration of these tools. The straight and claw chisels are identical to the illustrations in the French book I refer to. The \'cutting hammer\" is pretty similar to the illustrations of \'layes\'. It also shows a \'kivel\' or \'stone mason\'s hammer\' which differs in that one of the blades is at right-angles to the shaft.

GRADINE. A kind of puncheon used by the Marble worker.

claw chisel - A stoneworking chisel with the blade fashioned into small teeth. It is used for shaping and leaves striations in the stone surface. A \"dente di cane\" (Italian for \"dog\'s teeth\") is type of claw chisel having six or so fine notches in its carving edge. A claw chisel with two long points is know as a calcagnolo (Italian) or as a pied de biche (French). Also see bush hammer and drove.

However, bush hammer does not appear to fit :
bush hammer - A steel stone-carving tool, often with a large, brick-like head, having two striking ends, each covered with rows of pyramidal metal points. Found in several sizes, some with a longer, thinner head. Bush hammers are used to dress the surface of stone by breaking down the rock surface, pounding and removing small amounts at a time. The textures achieved are typical among finish in traditional French masonry. Granite and other igneous rock is worked with a bush hammer, although now it is usually an electrically motorized version. Also called by its French name, \"bouchard\" or \"boucharde.\" Also see ballpein hammer, claw hammer, and mallet.

drove - In carving stone, a flat chisel with a broad head [ CHASSE?? ] generally used only for rough hewing. Also, a stone surface dressed with such a chisel. Also see claw chisel and tools.
[http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/Ci.html]


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-03-08 18:06:16 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Stone hammer, a hammer formed with a face at one end, and a thick, blunt edge, parallel with the handle, at the other, -- used for breaking stone

xxxBourth
Local time: 05:31
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 18679
Grading comment
Thanks; exhaustive and helpful.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  hodierne: most exhaustive
33 mins

agree  Shog Imas
5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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