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Soufflet de cardan

English translation: CV gaiter

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:Soufflet de cardan
English translation:CV gaiter
Entered by: Alan Campbell
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11:45 Sep 1, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Automotive / Cars & Trucks
French term or phrase: Soufflet de cardan
I drove through a pothole and put a kink in the wheel on my 1997 VW Passat. That meant a trip to the garage and the usual complete failure to understand the vocab of the French-speaking mechanic.

He took off the wheel and explained that there was a problem with the soufflet de cardan and that grease was leaking. I've tried hard to find out what that actually means but have been unable to figure it out. My knowledge of car mechanics is extremely limited and I would like to know what I've broken.

I did find this KudoZ entry: http://www.proz.com/kudoz/407815 but it doesn't seem directly to apply to my situation.

Thanks
Alan Campbell
Local time: 06:34
gaiter OR boot [more colloquial] for CV joint OR UJ
Explanation:
Commonly referred to as 'gaiter' in the trade, I believe, but more familiarly amongst engineers as 'boot'

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Note added at 1 hr (2006-09-01 12:48:59 GMT)
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It keeps road dirt out and grease in; not too serious in the short term, but needs prompt repalcement to avoid premature wear of your UJ (a more expensive part to replace!). If you've been driving with it split for some time (often the case), the UJ probably needs replacing anyway
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 07:34
Grading comment
The very thing. Many thanks for the professional response Tony. I checked with my brother (a mechanic) when I could get through to him, and he knew straight away that I was describing a CV gaiter. Apparently it's an MOT failure if it's leaking fluid.

I had it changed today and it was noted that the left one should also be monitored.

By the way, my car is a 1997 VW Passat.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2gaiter OR boot [more colloquial] for CV joint OR UJ
Tony M
2 +2(Cardan) Universal joint
Bailatjones
3drive shaft bellow
Francis MARC


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
drive shaft bellow


Explanation:
Soufflet de Cardan. Drive shaft bellow. MERCRUISER. Fuelle escape. Tube échappement. Exhaust tube. Fuelle transom. Soufflet cardan. Drive shaft bellow ...
www.imnasa.com/catalogo/pdf/604_to_660.pdf -




Francis MARC
Lithuania
Local time: 08:34
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 118

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Not the usual name in UK English, at least
45 mins

neutral  Richard Benham: "Bellows" in this sense.
2 hrs
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
(Cardan) Universal joint


Explanation:
just had mine looked at yesterday

I think he's talking about your U-joint bellows: but I'm not 100% sur about the bellows part.
here is a small article that might offer some illumination in any case
http://www.heli-cal.com/Html/Literature/HPC_News/hnvol6.htm

Begins...
The oldest and most common type of u-joint is called the Cardan or Hooke type joint. It consists of hub yokes, connected by a cross shaped intermediate member. These popular u-joints are frequently used in automotive applications. Because the design incorporates several different piece parts, the moving parts of this type of u-joint usually require lubrication; and as the joint wears, the amount of backlash or free play within the joint itself grows. Even a lubricated Cardan u-joint will require periodic maintenance, and may leak lubricant


Bailatjones
Switzerland
Local time: 07:34
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Terry Richards: Yes, it's the bellows.
4 mins

agree  Tony M: Yes, for the joint, though I don't believe we usually call them 'bellows' in UK English, at least
48 mins
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59 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
soufflet de cardan
gaiter OR boot [more colloquial] for CV joint OR UJ


Explanation:
Commonly referred to as 'gaiter' in the trade, I believe, but more familiarly amongst engineers as 'boot'

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2006-09-01 12:48:59 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It keeps road dirt out and grease in; not too serious in the short term, but needs prompt repalcement to avoid premature wear of your UJ (a more expensive part to replace!). If you've been driving with it split for some time (often the case), the UJ probably needs replacing anyway

Tony M
France
Local time: 07:34
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 448
Grading comment
The very thing. Many thanks for the professional response Tony. I checked with my brother (a mechanic) when I could get through to him, and he knew straight away that I was describing a CV gaiter. Apparently it's an MOT failure if it's leaking fluid.

I had it changed today and it was noted that the left one should also be monitored.

By the way, my car is a 1997 VW Passat.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Chris Collins: Certainly in UK. But standard propshaft UJs are sealed and don't need a gaiter/boot
53 mins
  -> Thanks, Chris! They've changed a bit, then, since all my recent cars had them!

agree  Richard Benham: "Cardan joint" (after the inventor, Geronimo Cardano, from memory) is also used in English, but less so than in some other languages. "Gaiter" sounds a bit quaint to me, but then I live on the other side of the world.
1 hr
  -> Thanks, RB! I confess I'd never heard 'cardan' before coming to France, but quaint or not, I can assure you that 'gaiter' is indeed the term used in this (and several other) applications.
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