KudoZ home » French to English » Bus/Financial

CP

English translation: Sales

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
14:45 May 9, 2002
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial
French term or phrase: CP
Only read if you are patient and thank you very much in advance!

I posted this yesterday but together with another abbreviation so I will try again with a hopefully better description.

I have a bar chart titled:

Seuil absolu de 'product X' en HYPERMARCHES P2/P3 2001

The vertical axis is in English already and says:
Percent sales, ACV

The horizontal axis shows:
Prix au Litre en F (10 cts Intervals)

There are two coloured bars in the chart: red which is '% Ventes' & yellow which is '% CA Categorie'

Then, there is a green line which crosses the bar chart horizontally and this is:

'Ventes par million de CA de la CP'

And this is where I become stuck. Any ideas please?
Thank you :-)
xxxAnneM
Local time: 19:20
English translation:Sales
Explanation:
CA is chiffre d'affaires

Percentage of sales by category=%CA Catégorie

in the US, it is Sales
in the UK, Turnover

That really is it.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-09 15:19:48 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry: CP categorie produit?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-09 15:21:43 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Product Category as % Total Sales

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-09 16:12:42 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

OK, based on discussion below, why not: PC as % of Total Sales and let them figure it out; after all, it\'s not IN the text so since both acronyms work...
Selected response from:

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +3SalesJane Lamb-Ruiz
4capital propre (stockholders equity)
R. A. Stegemann
4ACV (I know it's not the Q, but it's a start!)xxxLia Fail
4CP Categorie promocionel???xxxLia Fail


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Sales


Explanation:
CA is chiffre d'affaires

Percentage of sales by category=%CA Catégorie

in the US, it is Sales
in the UK, Turnover

That really is it.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-09 15:19:48 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry: CP categorie produit?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-09 15:21:43 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Product Category as % Total Sales

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-09 16:12:42 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

OK, based on discussion below, why not: PC as % of Total Sales and let them figure it out; after all, it\'s not IN the text so since both acronyms work...

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 8576
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Arthur Borges: Could "CP" be an acronym for the product itself?
4 mins

agree  Florence B: oui pour ca - j'aurais bien suggéré code-produit pour cp mais c'est au féminin..(on dit facilement code-produit pour 'produit portant une seule et même référence' - mais bon ici il y a un os..
26 mins

agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: catégorie produit, code produit.... I think this is going to be pure guesswork and this again is one to be put to the client.
29 mins
  -> Why? if it's one or the other, it can be PC as % of Total Sales. Why babysit if it can be avoided?:)

agree  Jean-Luc Dumont: je pense que c'est % du chiffres d'affaires catégorie de produits
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
ACV (I know it's not the Q, but it's a start!)


Explanation:
Retail sales data has been used extensively to manage ****categories in the grocery industry for many years. However, it's a relative newcomer to the hardware/home improvement industry. As more and more hardware manufacturers adopt the practices of consumer package goods manufacturers, retail point-of-sale (POS) data has become a frequent part of overall product, brand and category management.

There are many powerful stories that can be told from POS data-some of which are not readily apparent with standard coverage and performance measures. Listed below are a few measures of retail coverage and performance that our clients have found to be very helpful:

All Commodity Volume (ACV) percentage for stores selling a product or brand.
Sales per million dollars of ACV that cross the cash registers.
Sales (dollars or units) per point of ACV percentage.

ACV Defined

ACV, or All Commodity Volume, is simply the measure of ****total dollar volume for all items sold through a particular retail store type within a measurable market area*** . This would include all products sold at retail, but not any services or labor charges.

For example: All chain home centers in the U.S. sold approximately $75 billion worth of products in 2000. ACV dollars can be calculated for regions of the country, and for particular Designated Market Areas (DMAs), such as the Chicago metropolitan area.

Here are the three measures of ACV mentioned above that are particularly helpful:

ACV Percentage for Stores Selling
This is a measure of market coverage that answers the following questions: Of the retail stores that sold a particular item or brand, what percent of total hardware/home improvement dollars do those stores represent? What percentage of total ACV dollars in a market is sold by the stores that carry my products or brands?

Unlike share measures, the percent ACV measure by itself does not use the sales dollars of the item or brand in question. It only measures the total sales dollars (ACV) of the stores where that item or brand is sold during a month-or combination of months. It is the percentage of total market ACV dollars that is sold by the stores that sell your items or brands.

For example: If total annual ACV for all chain home centers in the Chicago metro area is $1.75 billion, and your item (or brand) has been sold by Chicago chain home center stores whose collective ACV is $.825 billion, then the percent ACV for stores selling that item or brand in Chicago is .825/1.75, or 47 percent.

In the Chicago area, you can compare this 47 percent "store dollar coverage" to more standard coverage measures. If there are 150 chain home centers in Chicago, and your products have been sold by 35 of those chain stores, then the percent of stores selling those items is only 23 percent (35/150). The comparison between percent ACV and percent stores selling shows that those 35 home centers sell more products, on an average dollar basis, than the 115 chain home centers that didn't sell your products.


Sales Per Million Dollars ACV
These next two measures of ACV use the ***sales of a particular product, brand or category in question. Sales per million dollars of ACV is simply a measure of the sales for a particular item, brand or segment, for every $1 million of total products sold, by the stores that sell that particular item, brand or segment.

For example:

Total d-i-y hammer sales in Northeast U.S. chains: $6,520,000
Total ACV in Northeast U.S. chains (in millions): $6,630
Sales per million dollars ACV = $6,520,000
$6,630
= $983.41

This means that for every $1,000,000 in chain home center sales, the "average" chain home center in the Northeast should sell $983.41 in d-i-y hammers.

Sales per million dollars ACV can be compared across time periods (as frequently as each month), across market areas (down to some metropolitan statistical areas), or across brands.

ACV measures can also be related to brand and item sales using the third ACV calculation:


Product Sales Per Point of ACV Percentage
Here's an example of analyzing the sales of two hammers on an apples-to-apples basis:

Northeast U.S. Chains: 3-Month Dollar Sales % ACV Dollar Sales
per pt. of ACV%
Brand A hammers (all models) $183,333 57 3,216
Brand B hammers (all models) $209,966 74 2,837

Brand A hammer sales occurred in stores that account for 57 percent of the dollars sold through Chain Home Centers in the Northeast U.S., compared to B's 74 percent retail dollar exposure.

In this example, Brand B outsells Brand A by $26,633 because their hammers are sold at stores with more total ACV dollar coverage (either due to larger stores or more stores). However, Brand A sells 13 percent more per percentage point of ACV. In other words, if Brand A hammers were also sold at stores accounting for 74 percent ACV, theoretically it would sell $237,984! This would be a great story to tell at a line review or on a sales call-especially since you can calculate rough forecasts using existing sales rates.

Another example:

Northeast U.S. Chains: 3-Month Dollar Sales % ACV Dollar Sales per Million $ACV
Brand A hammers (all models)
(183,333/[.57*6,630]) $183,333 57 $49
Brand B hammers (all models)
(209,966/[.74*6,630]) $209,966 74 $43
Total ACV (millions) $6,630


Again, Brand B hammers outsell Brand A hammers by $26,633 overall. But, for every million dollars sold by the stores that carry Brand A, $49 of Brand A hammers are sold compared to only 43 of Brand B. What a great tool to gain item or brand placement in stores not stocking your items or brands.


Conclusion:

ACV measures are powerful ways of showing ****sales potential in order to gain retail placement. Of course, calculating ACV requires several levels of retail sales data. However, the effort involved in obtaining those facts and figures is well worth it-especially when preparing for sales calls and line reviews


xxxLia Fail
Spain
Local time: 19:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 60
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
CP Categorie promocionel???


Explanation:
http://216.239.51.100/search?q=cache:wChPP4mrPPsC:www.acniel...

See this page (altho it's not actually very useful, but it inspired me with this, for what it's worth)



xxxLia Fail
Spain
Local time: 19:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 60
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
capital propre (stockholders equity)


Explanation:
In your particular case 'CA de la CP' would be 'equity turnover' .

Equity turnover is a financial ratio that measures a firm's operating performance (in this case CA) in terms of owner equity (CP).

The purpose of the ratio is to determine the number of sales dollars generated per each dollar of equity capital.

It differs, for example, from 'total asset turnover' in so far as it does not include such things as current liabilities, long term debt, and preferred stock.

A little belated, but certainly worth a glossary entry.




    Reference: http://fr.biz.yahoo.com/educ_lex.html
R. A. Stegemann
Saudi Arabia
Local time: 02:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 168
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search